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  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154868
    Description:

    With Canadian companies increasingly engaged in the global economy there is a growing demand for more detailed information on their international activities to better understand how Canadian businesses are expanding internationally and what the benefits and consequences are for Canada.

    Release date: 2017-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201100311549
    Description:

    Canada is endowed with substantial reserves of natural resources, from energy and minerals in the ground to accessible stands of timber in forests. This article provides a brief overview of recent trends in Canada's natural resource wealth, which reflects the current dollar value of selected natural resource reserves.

    Release date: 2011-09-20

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007450
    Description:

    The manufacturing sector is a vital part of the Canadian economy. In 2002, it accounted for $165 billion of Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) and more than two million jobs. Unlike the other G7 countries, the contribution of the manufacturing sector to the Canadian economy has been increasing.

    From 1997 to 2002, average labour productivity growth in the manufacturing was slightly lower than the average for all industries. Part of this could be explained by the relatively low capital investment in the sector.

    In 2001, the R&D expenditure by the manufacturing sector represented 70 percent of all industrial R&D expenditures. The R&D intensity for the sector is about four times greater than that of all industries in Canada.

    The manufacturing sector has driven much of Canada's trade. In 2002, manufacturing exports accounted for 64 percent of Canada's total exports of goods and services. The sector became much more export dependent but Canada's overall manufacturing trade balance was negative. Nevertheless, Canada's manufacturing sector has been a success story.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010085881
    Description:

    This article offers some historical perspective on industrial strife in Canada, for example, the number of strikes and lockouts and workdays lost over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

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  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007450
    Description:

    The manufacturing sector is a vital part of the Canadian economy. In 2002, it accounted for $165 billion of Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) and more than two million jobs. Unlike the other G7 countries, the contribution of the manufacturing sector to the Canadian economy has been increasing.

    From 1997 to 2002, average labour productivity growth in the manufacturing was slightly lower than the average for all industries. Part of this could be explained by the relatively low capital investment in the sector.

    In 2001, the R&D expenditure by the manufacturing sector represented 70 percent of all industrial R&D expenditures. The R&D intensity for the sector is about four times greater than that of all industries in Canada.

    The manufacturing sector has driven much of Canada's trade. In 2002, manufacturing exports accounted for 64 percent of Canada's total exports of goods and services. The sector became much more export dependent but Canada's overall manufacturing trade balance was negative. Nevertheless, Canada's manufacturing sector has been a success story.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

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