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All (18)

All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901211053
    Description:

    This paper re-examines Canadian real GDI relative to the US converted with purchasing power parities based on what production can purchase rather than conventional measures based on production, which narrows the shortfall of Canada's relative income per capita from 15% in 2002 to 8% in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900810917
    Description:

    Manufacturing's share of nominal GDP has fallen over the last half century due to lower relative prices in Canada, not a declining volume of production. These price declines reflect productivity growth, while also lowered the share of manufacturing in employment. Canada's manufacturing structure shifted to mirror the United States after free trade was introduced in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2009-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200801210765
    Description:

    This paper examines Ontario's and Quebec's adjustments to the resource boom. Higher commodity prices, an appreciating dollar, and increased foreign competition between 2002 and 2007 led to a restructuring of the Central Canadian economies. The restructuring manifested itself in all areas of the economy: manufacturing employment and output declined, while services and construction rose; within manufacturing there were declines across most industries in Ontario, and a shift away from consumer products towards capital products in Quebec; purchasing power increased in Ontario and Quebec as export and import prices adjusted.

    Release date: 2008-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800110510
    Description:

    This paper empirically illustrates the impact of ongoing changes to Canada's terms of trade. It provides a discussion of how the terms of trade are measured and how to interpret terms of trade shifts. Examples of two major factors affecting Canada's terms of trade are provided, followed by an empirical analysis of how the terms of trade improvements that began in early 2003 have affected consumption, investment and import activity. The paper concludes by illustrating why final domestic demand growth has outpaced real GDP growth since 2003.

    Release date: 2008-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060059196
    Description:

    This article looks at some of the reasons behind the recent rebound in the British Columbia economy from its doldrums in the 1990s. It also examines how the current boom in British Columbia differs from Alberta and what can be learned from Alberta's experience.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510613144
    Description:

    The G8 countries have only 13% of the world's population, but they account for 46% of the global economy. Despite being the smallest member of the group, Canada's GDP per capita puts it near the top of the economic ranking. This article presents selected indicators from various sources to describe how Canada compares with the other members of the G8, highlighting changes since the early 1990s.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050017759
    Description:

    This paper investigates the size of the output and productivity shortfall between Canada and the US in the late 1990s and finds that the primary reason for the difference in not lower labour productivity but fewer hours worked per capita.

    Release date: 2005-01-13

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007449
    Description:

    The state and local government sector owns nearly 90% of the nonmilitary capital structures and 70% of the nonmilitary equipment in the U.S. As such state and local governments are the key policymakers in determining levels of infrastructure investment. Yet as stewards of infrastructure, the states have had a rocky history. Current engineering studies examining the condition of U.S. capital stock suggest that much of it is disrepair and that investments of nearly $1.6 trillion would be needed over the next 5 years to restore full functionality to major types of infrastructure.

    Recently states have shown renewed interest in using capital investment in infrastructure as an economic development tool. Popular economic development theories based on enhancing industry agglomeration often find the condition of key infrastructure as a factor in economic growth. While many states accept this conclusion, they are faced with a policy conundrum. Facing tight fiscal circumstances, states and localities are trying to determine which infrastructure investments matter in triggering economic growth. This paper will survey what is known about measuring the effect of infrastructure investment and discuss whether states are asking the right questions before spending infrastructure dollars.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M20030436697
    Description:

    This document contains historical analysis of the provincial and territorial economies from 1981 to 2002. It looks at their structural changes from the perspectives of the evolution of industries and the different components of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

    Release date: 2003-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030106668
    Description:

    The paper looks at the level of Canadian direct investment abroad (CDIA) from 1999 to 2001 and examines the impact on it of acquisitions of foreign companies and sales of foreign affiliates.

    Release date: 2003-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020038526
    Description:

    The definition of the Information and communications technologies (ICT) sector will be modified to conform more closely to the international standard developed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Specifically, libraries and the retailing of ICT commodities will be removed from the aggregation, but due to data limitations we will not include the repair of ICT equipment in our aggregation. The estimates will be reworked back to January 1997.

    Release date: 2002-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020018528
    Description:

    As of January 31, 2002 the monthly GDP by industry estimates will include Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) series. Three new aggregation series for the Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) sector and its manufacturing and services components are available back to January 1997 on CANSIM II.

    Release date: 2002-01-31

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005491
    Description:

    This chapter examines how productivity growth is measured, long- and short-run trends in productivity growth, the importance of productivity for economic growth and the contribution of productivity growth to the standard of living.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005494
    Description:

    This chapter examines long-run productivity growth trends in the Canadian and U.S. business and manufacturing sectors, and short-run growth in labour productivity.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990014408
    Description:

    Seasonality is an important issue because it can add a burden to the economy. The short-term use of seasonal labour is a more costly process than a steady use of labour throughout the year. This article reviews the change in seasonal employment patterns over the past two decades, and looks at how various industries, dempgraphic groups and regions have been affected.

    Release date: 1999-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014018
    Description:

    In this chapter we document trends in social transfers, market incomes and family composition from 1973 through 1995, and their impact on the incidence of low-income among four generations: children (new-borns to those 14 years of age), young adults (25 to 34), the older working-age population (45 to 54), and the elderly (over 65).

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970012992
    Description:

    Jobs have been declining in the clothing industry since the late 1980s while production has grown. This article examines this trend, profiles those employed in the industry since 1981, and discusses factors most likely to affect future employment trends. National, provincial and

    international data are also presented.

    Release date: 1997-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011780
    Description:

    When productivity increases in a sector, does it mean employment growth? This article explores the question and introduces a new concept: multifactor productivity.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901211053
    Description:

    This paper re-examines Canadian real GDI relative to the US converted with purchasing power parities based on what production can purchase rather than conventional measures based on production, which narrows the shortfall of Canada's relative income per capita from 15% in 2002 to 8% in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900810917
    Description:

    Manufacturing's share of nominal GDP has fallen over the last half century due to lower relative prices in Canada, not a declining volume of production. These price declines reflect productivity growth, while also lowered the share of manufacturing in employment. Canada's manufacturing structure shifted to mirror the United States after free trade was introduced in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2009-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200801210765
    Description:

    This paper examines Ontario's and Quebec's adjustments to the resource boom. Higher commodity prices, an appreciating dollar, and increased foreign competition between 2002 and 2007 led to a restructuring of the Central Canadian economies. The restructuring manifested itself in all areas of the economy: manufacturing employment and output declined, while services and construction rose; within manufacturing there were declines across most industries in Ontario, and a shift away from consumer products towards capital products in Quebec; purchasing power increased in Ontario and Quebec as export and import prices adjusted.

    Release date: 2008-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800110510
    Description:

    This paper empirically illustrates the impact of ongoing changes to Canada's terms of trade. It provides a discussion of how the terms of trade are measured and how to interpret terms of trade shifts. Examples of two major factors affecting Canada's terms of trade are provided, followed by an empirical analysis of how the terms of trade improvements that began in early 2003 have affected consumption, investment and import activity. The paper concludes by illustrating why final domestic demand growth has outpaced real GDP growth since 2003.

    Release date: 2008-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060059196
    Description:

    This article looks at some of the reasons behind the recent rebound in the British Columbia economy from its doldrums in the 1990s. It also examines how the current boom in British Columbia differs from Alberta and what can be learned from Alberta's experience.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510613144
    Description:

    The G8 countries have only 13% of the world's population, but they account for 46% of the global economy. Despite being the smallest member of the group, Canada's GDP per capita puts it near the top of the economic ranking. This article presents selected indicators from various sources to describe how Canada compares with the other members of the G8, highlighting changes since the early 1990s.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050017759
    Description:

    This paper investigates the size of the output and productivity shortfall between Canada and the US in the late 1990s and finds that the primary reason for the difference in not lower labour productivity but fewer hours worked per capita.

    Release date: 2005-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M20030436697
    Description:

    This document contains historical analysis of the provincial and territorial economies from 1981 to 2002. It looks at their structural changes from the perspectives of the evolution of industries and the different components of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

    Release date: 2003-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030106668
    Description:

    The paper looks at the level of Canadian direct investment abroad (CDIA) from 1999 to 2001 and examines the impact on it of acquisitions of foreign companies and sales of foreign affiliates.

    Release date: 2003-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020038526
    Description:

    The definition of the Information and communications technologies (ICT) sector will be modified to conform more closely to the international standard developed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Specifically, libraries and the retailing of ICT commodities will be removed from the aggregation, but due to data limitations we will not include the repair of ICT equipment in our aggregation. The estimates will be reworked back to January 1997.

    Release date: 2002-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020018528
    Description:

    As of January 31, 2002 the monthly GDP by industry estimates will include Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) series. Three new aggregation series for the Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) sector and its manufacturing and services components are available back to January 1997 on CANSIM II.

    Release date: 2002-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990014408
    Description:

    Seasonality is an important issue because it can add a burden to the economy. The short-term use of seasonal labour is a more costly process than a steady use of labour throughout the year. This article reviews the change in seasonal employment patterns over the past two decades, and looks at how various industries, dempgraphic groups and regions have been affected.

    Release date: 1999-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014018
    Description:

    In this chapter we document trends in social transfers, market incomes and family composition from 1973 through 1995, and their impact on the incidence of low-income among four generations: children (new-borns to those 14 years of age), young adults (25 to 34), the older working-age population (45 to 54), and the elderly (over 65).

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970012992
    Description:

    Jobs have been declining in the clothing industry since the late 1980s while production has grown. This article examines this trend, profiles those employed in the industry since 1981, and discusses factors most likely to affect future employment trends. National, provincial and

    international data are also presented.

    Release date: 1997-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011780
    Description:

    When productivity increases in a sector, does it mean employment growth? This article explores the question and introduces a new concept: multifactor productivity.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007449
    Description:

    The state and local government sector owns nearly 90% of the nonmilitary capital structures and 70% of the nonmilitary equipment in the U.S. As such state and local governments are the key policymakers in determining levels of infrastructure investment. Yet as stewards of infrastructure, the states have had a rocky history. Current engineering studies examining the condition of U.S. capital stock suggest that much of it is disrepair and that investments of nearly $1.6 trillion would be needed over the next 5 years to restore full functionality to major types of infrastructure.

    Recently states have shown renewed interest in using capital investment in infrastructure as an economic development tool. Popular economic development theories based on enhancing industry agglomeration often find the condition of key infrastructure as a factor in economic growth. While many states accept this conclusion, they are faced with a policy conundrum. Facing tight fiscal circumstances, states and localities are trying to determine which infrastructure investments matter in triggering economic growth. This paper will survey what is known about measuring the effect of infrastructure investment and discuss whether states are asking the right questions before spending infrastructure dollars.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

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