Statistics by subject – Economic accounts

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All (10)

All (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154881
    Description:

    Canada’s society and economy continue to grow and evolve. Statistics Canada strives to keep its programs up to date with changing trends and circumstances to ensure Canadians are well informed about current developments. This means Statistics Canada has to innovate and invest in the statistical system continuously. The prospective legalization of cannabis means Statistics Canada needs to start preparing Canada’s statistical system to capture the associated economic and social implications.

    Release date: 2017-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X201400014117
    Description:

    The 2014 article “Agriculture in Canada” gathers together a variety of statistics describing agriculture from the perspective of ecosystem goods and services.

    The article addresses the ecological infrastructure supporting agricultural activity (Section 2), ecosystem goods and services from agriculture (Section 3), the main beneficiaries of these goods and services (Section 4) and the environmental impacts and management activities associated with agriculture (Section 5). Section 6 provides an example to illustrate how agricultural information can be integrated into a system of environmental accounts that follow international guidelines being developed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Section 7 concludes with a short listing of areas requiring further research.

    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X201100011438
    Description:

    This analytical article "Economy and the environment", provides information on the relationship between Canada's economy and environment. The report starts with a discussion of how the economy and the environment can be linked in conceptual terms (Section 2). It then presents Canada's environment in the international context (Section 3). Sections 4, 5 and 6 highlight Canada's endowment of natural resources and underlines their role in our economy with statistics on timber, energy, minerals, land and fresh water. Section 7 focuses on the flow of materials and energy between the economy and the environment with statistics on the intensity of energy use and resulting greenhouse gas emissions. Finally, Section 8 presents a selection of statistics on what households, businesses and governments are doing to reduce their impact on the environment.

    Release date: 2011-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900610893
    Description:

    Using national accounts data on the financial flows, balance sheets and Canada's international investments, this paper shows how the crisis in financial markets has affected financial behaviour in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20060039214
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts covering the period 2002 to 2005 have been released along with those for the first quarter of 2006. The current revisions to GDP resulted from the inclusion of the most current estimates from data sources, including survey results, administrative data and public accounts.

    Release date: 2006-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060049179
    Description:

    After having run deficits for almost 30 years, corporations have emerged with significant surplus positions in the last decade. This has placed the corporate sector in a new role - that of increasingly supplying funds to the rest of the economy.

    Release date: 2006-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20060019175
    Description:

    The National Accounts Advisory Committee reviews and gives advice on the concepts, methods, plans, standards as well as results associated with Statistics Canada's System of National Accounts.

    Release date: 2006-03-31

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007448
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the contribution of public capital to productivity growth in the Canadian business sector. The approach developed here incorporates demand and supply forces, including the contribution of public capital, which may affect productivity performance. We estimate the model using disaggregated data composed of 37-industries in the Canadian business sector from 1961 to 2000. The results indicate that the main contributors to productivity growth, both at the industry and aggregate levels, are technical change and exogenous demand (representing the effect of aggregate income and population growth). Public capital contributed for about 18% of the overall business sector multifactor productivity growth over the 1961 to 2000 period. This is somewhat lower than the figures reported in the literature. However, the magnitudes of the contribution of public capital to productivity growth vary significantly across industries, with the largest impact occurring in transportation, trade and utilities.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19910032426
    Description:

    Has recovery begun? An up-to-date look at labour market developments in the first six months of 1991.

    Release date: 1991-09-05

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Analysis (9)

Analysis (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154881
    Description:

    Canada’s society and economy continue to grow and evolve. Statistics Canada strives to keep its programs up to date with changing trends and circumstances to ensure Canadians are well informed about current developments. This means Statistics Canada has to innovate and invest in the statistical system continuously. The prospective legalization of cannabis means Statistics Canada needs to start preparing Canada’s statistical system to capture the associated economic and social implications.

    Release date: 2017-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X201400014117
    Description:

    The 2014 article “Agriculture in Canada” gathers together a variety of statistics describing agriculture from the perspective of ecosystem goods and services.

    The article addresses the ecological infrastructure supporting agricultural activity (Section 2), ecosystem goods and services from agriculture (Section 3), the main beneficiaries of these goods and services (Section 4) and the environmental impacts and management activities associated with agriculture (Section 5). Section 6 provides an example to illustrate how agricultural information can be integrated into a system of environmental accounts that follow international guidelines being developed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Section 7 concludes with a short listing of areas requiring further research.

    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X201100011438
    Description:

    This analytical article "Economy and the environment", provides information on the relationship between Canada's economy and environment. The report starts with a discussion of how the economy and the environment can be linked in conceptual terms (Section 2). It then presents Canada's environment in the international context (Section 3). Sections 4, 5 and 6 highlight Canada's endowment of natural resources and underlines their role in our economy with statistics on timber, energy, minerals, land and fresh water. Section 7 focuses on the flow of materials and energy between the economy and the environment with statistics on the intensity of energy use and resulting greenhouse gas emissions. Finally, Section 8 presents a selection of statistics on what households, businesses and governments are doing to reduce their impact on the environment.

    Release date: 2011-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900610893
    Description:

    Using national accounts data on the financial flows, balance sheets and Canada's international investments, this paper shows how the crisis in financial markets has affected financial behaviour in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20060039214
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts covering the period 2002 to 2005 have been released along with those for the first quarter of 2006. The current revisions to GDP resulted from the inclusion of the most current estimates from data sources, including survey results, administrative data and public accounts.

    Release date: 2006-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060049179
    Description:

    After having run deficits for almost 30 years, corporations have emerged with significant surplus positions in the last decade. This has placed the corporate sector in a new role - that of increasingly supplying funds to the rest of the economy.

    Release date: 2006-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20060019175
    Description:

    The National Accounts Advisory Committee reviews and gives advice on the concepts, methods, plans, standards as well as results associated with Statistics Canada's System of National Accounts.

    Release date: 2006-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19910032426
    Description:

    Has recovery begun? An up-to-date look at labour market developments in the first six months of 1991.

    Release date: 1991-09-05

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007448
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the contribution of public capital to productivity growth in the Canadian business sector. The approach developed here incorporates demand and supply forces, including the contribution of public capital, which may affect productivity performance. We estimate the model using disaggregated data composed of 37-industries in the Canadian business sector from 1961 to 2000. The results indicate that the main contributors to productivity growth, both at the industry and aggregate levels, are technical change and exogenous demand (representing the effect of aggregate income and population growth). Public capital contributed for about 18% of the overall business sector multifactor productivity growth over the 1961 to 2000 period. This is somewhat lower than the figures reported in the literature. However, the magnitudes of the contribution of public capital to productivity growth vary significantly across industries, with the largest impact occurring in transportation, trade and utilities.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

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