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All (371) (25 of 371 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017075
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first two quarters of 2017 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on October 6, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017004
    Description:

    Energy's run as the largest contributor to Canadian export earnings ended in 2015, as the world grappled with an over-supply of oil. This presentation looks at Statistics Canada data to help provide insight into related price movements, the gasoline value chain and the subsequent economic fallout.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017003
    Description:

    While Statistics Canada has data on virtually every aspect of the Canadian economy – as well as our society and the environment, this presentation focuses on providing some insights on recent trends in the Canadian economy. Statistics Canada publishes a great deal of economic data that is closely studied to understand the extent to which the economy is growing and changing – and how these changes are distributed across provinces, industries and different segments of the population.

    Release date: 2017-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154868
    Description:

    With Canadian companies increasingly engaged in the global economy there is a growing demand for more detailed information on their international activities to better understand how Canadian businesses are expanding internationally and what the benefits and consequences are for Canada.

    Release date: 2017-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154867
    Description:

    Updated benchmarks from the 2012 Canadian Tourism Satellite Account (CTSA) were incorporated. Other sources of new and revised data and selected methodological changes were also introduced. This article will focus mostly on revisions beginning in 2012, the reference year of the most recent CTSA.

    Release date: 2017-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017399
    Description:

    Canada is a trading nation that produces significant quantities of resource outputs. Consequently, the behaviour of resource prices that are important for Canada is germane to understanding the progress of real income growth and the prosperity of the country and the provinces. Demand and supply shocks or changes in monetary policy in international markets may exert significant influence on resource prices, and their fluctuations constitute an important avenue for the transmission of external shocks into the domestic economy. This paper develops historical estimates of the Bank of Canada commodity price index (BCPI) and links them to modern estimates. Using a collection of historical data sources, it estimates weights and prices sufficiently consistently to merit the construction of long-run estimates that may be linked to the modern Fisher BCPI.

    Release date: 2017-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114839
    Description:

    Users of macroeconomic statistics require long time series in order to understand economic cycles, forecast and conduct economic modeling. In general the longer the time series the better users are able to understand the economy. Statistics Canada has been producing macroeconomic account statistics since the 1930s. Over the last 80 plus years these statistics have evolved due to the changing nature of the economy, the development of international macroeconomic accounting standards and the development of new statistical methods and processes.

    Release date: 2017-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017394
    Description:

    For many goods, such as dairy products and alcoholic beverages, the presence of substantial (non-tariff) barriers to provincial trade is widely recognized. If these non-tariff barriers matter, intraprovincial trade should be stronger than interprovincial trade, all else being equal. However, comparing intraprovincial and interprovincial trade levels is challenging, because intraprovincial trade is heavily skewed toward short-distance flows. When these are not properly taken into account by gravity-based trade models, intraprovincial trade levels—provincial border effects—tend to be overestimated.

    Release date: 2017-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017074
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on changes in the Canadian manufacturing sector since 2000. Using data from the Canadian System of National Accounts and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, it provides an analysis of recent trends in Canadian manufacturing sector output, as well as a decomposition of the contribution of manufacturing industries to the evolution of the sector and a comparison with the United States.

    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114841
    Description:

    Trade patterns with the U.S. on a regional basis highlight the integration of industries between the two countries; proximity, transport infrastructure and government policy have all contributed to these interdependencies. Indeed, for the year 2016, 11 of Canada’s top 20 trading partners were U.S. states.

    Release date: 2017-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017086
    Description:

    The natural resources sector is an important part of the Canadian economic landscape. It plays a significant role in Canada’s economic growth, employment and investment. The development of new mines, energy sources, oil and gas reserves, as well as forest products, have led to the sector’s increasingly important role in Canada’s overall economic development. The sector is often an important driver of economic growth and is a key influence on regional economic performance. Given the importance of this sector, policymakers, researchers, businesses and households require comprehensive and timely statistics in order to assess the evolution, structure, role and contribution of this sector to the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2017-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114838
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change (Pan-Canadian Framework) was introduced by the Government of Canada in 2016, in effort to combat climate change (Environment and Climate Change Canada). Under the framework, Canadian jurisdictions are required to price carbon emissions by 2018.

    Release date: 2017-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114837
    Description:

    On January 6, 2017, the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled that they believe there is preliminary evidence that American producers are materially injured by imports of softwood lumber products from Canada. Subsequently, on April 24, 2017, the U.S. Department of Commerce announced its affirmative preliminary determination on the countervailing duty investigation.

    Release date: 2017-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201700114825
    Description:

    Natural resources play an important role in the Canadian economy because their extraction forms a significant component of Canada’s current income. Currently Canada’s natural resource asset accounts include energy resources, mineral resources and timber. The monetary value of a natural resource asset can be derived using several approaches such as market price, replacement cost and the net present value generated from the resource.

    This study summarizes the methods used to integrate the value of selected natural resource assets into Canada’s quarterly national balance sheet accounts. It also explains the need to incorporate natural resource assets to provide a more comprehensive picture of Canada’s wealth. Data sources used include the quarterly national balance sheet accounts and the annual natural resource asset accounts.

    Release date: 2017-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017085
    Description:

    This paper describes new estimates that are an extension of the existing Stock and Consumption of Fixed Capital Program (SCFC) and provide a short historical time series on a variety of asset classes. The main benefit of this product is that it provides information on the relationship between the timing and average age of infrastructure investments and their associated expected service lives, providing additional information on Canada’s infrastructure. It is not an all-inclusive assessment of the state of the infrastructure stock in Canada and data gaps remain. However, if interpreted correctly, they can provide useful information about requirements for infrastructure and non-infrastructure asset investment. Used as a benchmark to understand capital spending deficits or surpluses, changes over time can indicate when and where investment is required, in the context of the fiscal, economic and demographic landscape.

    Release date: 2017-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017083
    Description:

    Statistics Canada regularly publishes macroeconomic indicators on household assets, liabilities and net worth as part of the quarterly National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA). These accounts are aligned with the most recent international standards and are the source of estimates of national wealth for all sectors of the economy, including households, non-profit institutions, governments and corporations along with Canada’s wealth position vis-a-vis the rest of the world. While the NBSA provide high quality information on the overall position of households relative to other economic sectors, they lack the granularity required to understand vulnerabilities of specific groups and the resulting implications for economic wellbeing and financial stability.

    Release date: 2017-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017072
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2016 and early 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017001
    Description:

    This presentation focuses on key changes in the Canadian economic data since oil prices began to decline in mid-2014. The presentation highlights recent trends related to economic growth and labour market conditions, the impact of lower oil prices in current dollar terms and in volume terms, and the impact of a weaker Canadian dollar on merchandise trade and manufacturing.

    This presentation complements the release of Recent Developments in the Canadian Economy: Spring 2017. The graphs are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7th, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017084
    Description:

    The Tourism Satellite Account (TSA) measures the economic importance of tourism in Canada. The TSA extracts economic information on tourism from the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA). It uses the same measures of inputs, outputs, GDP and employment as the CSMA, and reorganizes information on tourism following the Tourism Satellite Account: Recommended Methodological Framework.

    Release date: 2017-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017007
    Description:

    An overview of the repercussions of this natural disaster on current production, insurance payments, and future planned construction are presented along with other contextual data. From localized impacts to the national picture the data shows the very different impacts the wildfires had on industry and Canadian citizens. The infographic, Fort McMurray 2016 Wildfires - Economic Impact, presents information from multiple Statistics Canada surveys including the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Gross Domestic Product by Industry (GDP).

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114771
    Description:

    The sharing economy has received a lot of attention lately from policy makers, businesses, the media and the public. The concept of the sharing economy is not new—people have been bartering and sharing goods and services throughout human history. Enabled by technology and social trends, the sharing economy is transforming the ways in which economic agents can produce and consume goods and services.

    Release date: 2017-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016065
    Description:

    The U.S.–Canada purchasing power parity (PPP) is a measure of the relative price level between Canada and the United States. It measures the difference, in dollars, that exists between the two countries for an individual or firm wishing to purchase an equivalent basket of goods and services in each country. This Economic Insights article presents quarterly estimates from Statistics Canada for the U.S.–Canada purchasing power parity. It is part of a series of research papers and articles that examine differences in price levels between Canada and the United States.

    Release date: 2016-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016066
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article assesses the effect of falling commodity prices on Canadian real income. It is part of a research program that examines links between natural resources and economic growth.

    Release date: 2016-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201600214685
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) covering the period 2013 to 2015 have been released. These revised estimates incorporate the most current source data and seasonal patterns.

    Release date: 2016-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21

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Analysis (371)

Analysis (371) (25 of 371 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017075
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first two quarters of 2017 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on October 6, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017004
    Description:

    Energy's run as the largest contributor to Canadian export earnings ended in 2015, as the world grappled with an over-supply of oil. This presentation looks at Statistics Canada data to help provide insight into related price movements, the gasoline value chain and the subsequent economic fallout.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017003
    Description:

    While Statistics Canada has data on virtually every aspect of the Canadian economy – as well as our society and the environment, this presentation focuses on providing some insights on recent trends in the Canadian economy. Statistics Canada publishes a great deal of economic data that is closely studied to understand the extent to which the economy is growing and changing – and how these changes are distributed across provinces, industries and different segments of the population.

    Release date: 2017-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154868
    Description:

    With Canadian companies increasingly engaged in the global economy there is a growing demand for more detailed information on their international activities to better understand how Canadian businesses are expanding internationally and what the benefits and consequences are for Canada.

    Release date: 2017-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154867
    Description:

    Updated benchmarks from the 2012 Canadian Tourism Satellite Account (CTSA) were incorporated. Other sources of new and revised data and selected methodological changes were also introduced. This article will focus mostly on revisions beginning in 2012, the reference year of the most recent CTSA.

    Release date: 2017-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017399
    Description:

    Canada is a trading nation that produces significant quantities of resource outputs. Consequently, the behaviour of resource prices that are important for Canada is germane to understanding the progress of real income growth and the prosperity of the country and the provinces. Demand and supply shocks or changes in monetary policy in international markets may exert significant influence on resource prices, and their fluctuations constitute an important avenue for the transmission of external shocks into the domestic economy. This paper develops historical estimates of the Bank of Canada commodity price index (BCPI) and links them to modern estimates. Using a collection of historical data sources, it estimates weights and prices sufficiently consistently to merit the construction of long-run estimates that may be linked to the modern Fisher BCPI.

    Release date: 2017-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114839
    Description:

    Users of macroeconomic statistics require long time series in order to understand economic cycles, forecast and conduct economic modeling. In general the longer the time series the better users are able to understand the economy. Statistics Canada has been producing macroeconomic account statistics since the 1930s. Over the last 80 plus years these statistics have evolved due to the changing nature of the economy, the development of international macroeconomic accounting standards and the development of new statistical methods and processes.

    Release date: 2017-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017394
    Description:

    For many goods, such as dairy products and alcoholic beverages, the presence of substantial (non-tariff) barriers to provincial trade is widely recognized. If these non-tariff barriers matter, intraprovincial trade should be stronger than interprovincial trade, all else being equal. However, comparing intraprovincial and interprovincial trade levels is challenging, because intraprovincial trade is heavily skewed toward short-distance flows. When these are not properly taken into account by gravity-based trade models, intraprovincial trade levels—provincial border effects—tend to be overestimated.

    Release date: 2017-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017074
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on changes in the Canadian manufacturing sector since 2000. Using data from the Canadian System of National Accounts and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, it provides an analysis of recent trends in Canadian manufacturing sector output, as well as a decomposition of the contribution of manufacturing industries to the evolution of the sector and a comparison with the United States.

    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114841
    Description:

    Trade patterns with the U.S. on a regional basis highlight the integration of industries between the two countries; proximity, transport infrastructure and government policy have all contributed to these interdependencies. Indeed, for the year 2016, 11 of Canada’s top 20 trading partners were U.S. states.

    Release date: 2017-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017086
    Description:

    The natural resources sector is an important part of the Canadian economic landscape. It plays a significant role in Canada’s economic growth, employment and investment. The development of new mines, energy sources, oil and gas reserves, as well as forest products, have led to the sector’s increasingly important role in Canada’s overall economic development. The sector is often an important driver of economic growth and is a key influence on regional economic performance. Given the importance of this sector, policymakers, researchers, businesses and households require comprehensive and timely statistics in order to assess the evolution, structure, role and contribution of this sector to the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2017-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114838
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change (Pan-Canadian Framework) was introduced by the Government of Canada in 2016, in effort to combat climate change (Environment and Climate Change Canada). Under the framework, Canadian jurisdictions are required to price carbon emissions by 2018.

    Release date: 2017-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114837
    Description:

    On January 6, 2017, the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled that they believe there is preliminary evidence that American producers are materially injured by imports of softwood lumber products from Canada. Subsequently, on April 24, 2017, the U.S. Department of Commerce announced its affirmative preliminary determination on the countervailing duty investigation.

    Release date: 2017-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201700114825
    Description:

    Natural resources play an important role in the Canadian economy because their extraction forms a significant component of Canada’s current income. Currently Canada’s natural resource asset accounts include energy resources, mineral resources and timber. The monetary value of a natural resource asset can be derived using several approaches such as market price, replacement cost and the net present value generated from the resource.

    This study summarizes the methods used to integrate the value of selected natural resource assets into Canada’s quarterly national balance sheet accounts. It also explains the need to incorporate natural resource assets to provide a more comprehensive picture of Canada’s wealth. Data sources used include the quarterly national balance sheet accounts and the annual natural resource asset accounts.

    Release date: 2017-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017085
    Description:

    This paper describes new estimates that are an extension of the existing Stock and Consumption of Fixed Capital Program (SCFC) and provide a short historical time series on a variety of asset classes. The main benefit of this product is that it provides information on the relationship between the timing and average age of infrastructure investments and their associated expected service lives, providing additional information on Canada’s infrastructure. It is not an all-inclusive assessment of the state of the infrastructure stock in Canada and data gaps remain. However, if interpreted correctly, they can provide useful information about requirements for infrastructure and non-infrastructure asset investment. Used as a benchmark to understand capital spending deficits or surpluses, changes over time can indicate when and where investment is required, in the context of the fiscal, economic and demographic landscape.

    Release date: 2017-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017083
    Description:

    Statistics Canada regularly publishes macroeconomic indicators on household assets, liabilities and net worth as part of the quarterly National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA). These accounts are aligned with the most recent international standards and are the source of estimates of national wealth for all sectors of the economy, including households, non-profit institutions, governments and corporations along with Canada’s wealth position vis-a-vis the rest of the world. While the NBSA provide high quality information on the overall position of households relative to other economic sectors, they lack the granularity required to understand vulnerabilities of specific groups and the resulting implications for economic wellbeing and financial stability.

    Release date: 2017-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017072
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2016 and early 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017001
    Description:

    This presentation focuses on key changes in the Canadian economic data since oil prices began to decline in mid-2014. The presentation highlights recent trends related to economic growth and labour market conditions, the impact of lower oil prices in current dollar terms and in volume terms, and the impact of a weaker Canadian dollar on merchandise trade and manufacturing.

    This presentation complements the release of Recent Developments in the Canadian Economy: Spring 2017. The graphs are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7th, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017084
    Description:

    The Tourism Satellite Account (TSA) measures the economic importance of tourism in Canada. The TSA extracts economic information on tourism from the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA). It uses the same measures of inputs, outputs, GDP and employment as the CSMA, and reorganizes information on tourism following the Tourism Satellite Account: Recommended Methodological Framework.

    Release date: 2017-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017007
    Description:

    An overview of the repercussions of this natural disaster on current production, insurance payments, and future planned construction are presented along with other contextual data. From localized impacts to the national picture the data shows the very different impacts the wildfires had on industry and Canadian citizens. The infographic, Fort McMurray 2016 Wildfires - Economic Impact, presents information from multiple Statistics Canada surveys including the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Gross Domestic Product by Industry (GDP).

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114771
    Description:

    The sharing economy has received a lot of attention lately from policy makers, businesses, the media and the public. The concept of the sharing economy is not new—people have been bartering and sharing goods and services throughout human history. Enabled by technology and social trends, the sharing economy is transforming the ways in which economic agents can produce and consume goods and services.

    Release date: 2017-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016065
    Description:

    The U.S.–Canada purchasing power parity (PPP) is a measure of the relative price level between Canada and the United States. It measures the difference, in dollars, that exists between the two countries for an individual or firm wishing to purchase an equivalent basket of goods and services in each country. This Economic Insights article presents quarterly estimates from Statistics Canada for the U.S.–Canada purchasing power parity. It is part of a series of research papers and articles that examine differences in price levels between Canada and the United States.

    Release date: 2016-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016066
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article assesses the effect of falling commodity prices on Canadian real income. It is part of a research program that examines links between natural resources and economic growth.

    Release date: 2016-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201600214685
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) covering the period 2013 to 2015 have been released. These revised estimates incorporate the most current source data and seasonal patterns.

    Release date: 2016-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21

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