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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017004
    Description:

    Energy's run as the largest contributor to Canadian export earnings ended in 2015, as the world grappled with an over-supply of oil. This presentation looks at Statistics Canada data to help provide insight into related price movements, the gasoline value chain and the subsequent economic fallout.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-631-X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada engages regularly with Canadians to discuss statistical findings about the country’s economy, society and environment. Events are held in various cities throughout the year to discuss the use of statistics in many fields. These events provide Statistics Canada with an opportunity to promote the role of official statistics and better understand data users’ needs.

    This series provides online access to the presentations that were made at outreach events with data users.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-626-X
    Description:

    Articles in the Economic Insights series highlight issues related to the growth and development of Canada's economy. In some cases, these articles synthesize the results of previous research carried out by Statistics Canada; in others, they provide contextual information that accompanies the release of new data. The Economic Insights series features concise examinations of economic events, trends, and important structural changes in the economy.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017075
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first two quarters of 2017 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on October 6, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-627-M
    Description:

    Every year, Statistics Canada collects data from hundreds of surveys. As the amount of data gathered increases, Statistics Canada has introduced infographics to help people, business owners, academics, and management at all levels, understand key information derived from the data. Infographics can be used to quickly communicate a message, to simplify the presentation of large amounts of data, to see data patterns and relationships, and to monitor changes in variables over time.

    These infographics will provide a quick overview of Statistics Canada survey data.

    Release date: 2017-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017003
    Description:

    While Statistics Canada has data on virtually every aspect of the Canadian economy – as well as our society and the environment, this presentation focuses on providing some insights on recent trends in the Canadian economy. Statistics Canada publishes a great deal of economic data that is closely studied to understand the extent to which the economy is growing and changing – and how these changes are distributed across provinces, industries and different segments of the population.

    Release date: 2017-10-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-605-X
    Description:

    This product contains articles related to the latest methodological, conceptual developments in the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts as well as the analysis of the Canadian economy. It includes articles detailing new methods, concepts and statistical techniques used to compile the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts. It also includes information related to new or expanded data products, provides updates and supplements to information found in various guides and analytical articles touching upon a broad range of topics related to the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2017-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154868
    Description:

    With Canadian companies increasingly engaged in the global economy there is a growing demand for more detailed information on their international activities to better understand how Canadian businesses are expanding internationally and what the benefits and consequences are for Canada.

    Release date: 2017-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154867
    Description:

    Updated benchmarks from the 2012 Canadian Tourism Satellite Account (CTSA) were incorporated. Other sources of new and revised data and selected methodological changes were also introduced. This article will focus mostly on revisions beginning in 2012, the reference year of the most recent CTSA.

    Release date: 2017-10-13

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-12

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017399
    Description:

    Canada is a trading nation that produces significant quantities of resource outputs. Consequently, the behaviour of resource prices that are important for Canada is germane to understanding the progress of real income growth and the prosperity of the country and the provinces. Demand and supply shocks or changes in monetary policy in international markets may exert significant influence on resource prices, and their fluctuations constitute an important avenue for the transmission of external shocks into the domestic economy. This paper develops historical estimates of the Bank of Canada commodity price index (BCPI) and links them to modern estimates. Using a collection of historical data sources, it estimates weights and prices sufficiently consistently to merit the construction of long-run estimates that may be linked to the modern Fisher BCPI.

    Release date: 2017-10-11

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-06

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-05

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-02

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-28

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114839
    Description:

    Users of macroeconomic statistics require long time series in order to understand economic cycles, forecast and conduct economic modeling. In general the longer the time series the better users are able to understand the economy. Statistics Canada has been producing macroeconomic account statistics since the 1930s. Over the last 80 plus years these statistics have evolved due to the changing nature of the economy, the development of international macroeconomic accounting standards and the development of new statistical methods and processes.

    Release date: 2017-09-18

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-14

Reference (148)

Reference (148) (25 of 148 results)

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2008020
    Description:

    This paper compares the productivity growth of a set of Canadian and U.S. regulated industries. Using data from Statistics Canada's KLEMS database and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the paper examines productivity growth in transportation services (which includes air and rail), broadcasting and telecommunications, and financial services (which includes financial intermediation and insurance), over the period from 1977 to 2003. The majority of these provide the foundational networks on which other industries rely. These sectors were quite heavily regulated in Canada at the beginning of the period of study (1977), experienced partial deregulation during the period and still faced various types of regulation at the end (2003). Deregulation also occurred in the United States, but regulation has generally been less restrictive there over most of the period.

    The evidence shows that many of the Canadian industries that underwent deregulation experienced faster labour productivity growth and multifactor productivity growth than did the aggregate Canadian business sector and had similar or higher productivity growth than did their counterparts in the United States over the 1977-to-2003 period. Those industries include rail transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, financial intermediation and insurance carriers. The airline industry had slower productivity growth in Canada than in the United States over the 1977-to-2003 period.

    Release date: 2008-11-26

  • Technical products: 12-589-X
    Description:

    This free publication presents the concepts and criteria utilized to determine the entities that comprise the public sector of Canada.

    The resulting statistical universe provides the framework to observe the extent of governments' involvement in the production of goods and services and the associated resource allocation process in the Canadian economy.

    The concepts and criteria contained in the guide are consistent with two internationally accepted classification standards: the System of National Accounts (SNA 2008) guide; and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Government Finance Statistics Manual 2001.

    As well, the guide delineates the various public sector components that are used in compiling and aggregating public sector data. This structure also enables comparisons of Canadian government finance data with international macroeconomic statistical systems.

    Release date: 2008-09-26

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2008019
    Description:

    This paper has three main objectives. First, it examines the level of multifactor productivity (MFP) in Canada relative to that of the United States for the 1994-to-2003 period. Second, it examines the relative importance of differences in capital intensity and MFP in accounting for the labour productivity differences between the two countries. Third, it traces the overall MFP difference between Canada and the United States to its industry origins and estimates the contributions of the goods, services and engineering sectors to the overall MFP gap.

    Our main findings are as follows. First, the overall capital intensity is as high in Canada as in the United States; but there are considerable differences in Canada's capital intensity across asset classes. Canada has considerably less machinery and equipment, about the same amount of buildings and considerably more engineering construction. Second, most of the differences in labour productivity between Canada and the United States are due to the differences in MFP. Third, our industry results show that the levels of labour productivity and MFP in the goods and the engineering sectors are closer to those of the United States. But, the level of labour and multifactor productivity in the services sector is much lower in Canada. The lower levels of labour productivity and MFP in the Canadian services sector account for most of the overall productivity level difference between the two countries.

    Release date: 2008-07-21

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2008018
    Description:

    Official data from statistical agencies are not always ideal for cross-country comparisons because of differences in data sources and methodology. Analysts who engage in cross-country comparisons need to carefully choose among alternatives and sometimes adapt data especially for their purposes. This paper develops comparable capital stock estimates to examine the relative capital intensity of Canada and the United States.

    To do so, the paper applies common depreciation rates to Canadian and U.S. assets to come up with comparable capital stock estimates by assets and by industry between the two countries. Based on common depreciation rates, it finds that capital intensity is higher in the Canadian business sector than in the U.S. business sector. This is the net result of quite different ratios at the individual asset level. Canada has as higher intensity of engineering infrastructure assets per dollar of gross domestic product produced. Canada has a lower intensity of information and communications technology (ICT) machinery and equipment (M&E). Non-ICT M&E and building assets intensities are more alike in the two countries.

    However, these results do not control for the fact that different asset-specific capital intensities between Canada and the United States may be the result of a different industrial structure. When both assets and industry structure are taken into account, the overall picture changes somewhat. Canada's business sector continues to have a higher intensity of engineering infrastructure and about the same intensity of building assets; however, it has a deficit in M&E that goes beyond ICT assets.

    Release date: 2008-07-10

  • Index and guides: 13-017-X2008001
    Release date: 2008-06-30

  • Index and guides: 13-017-X
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the Income and Expenditure Accounts. It provides an overview, an outline of the concepts and definitions, an explanation of the sources of information and statistical methods, a glossary of terms, and a broad compilation of other facts about the accounts.

    Release date: 2008-06-30

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2008016
    Description:

    This paper focuses on the role of investments in infrastructure in Canada. The size of infrastructure investments relative to other capital stock sets this country apart from most other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. The paper reviews the approaches taken by other researchers to define infrastructure. It then outlines a taxonomy to define those assets that should be considered as infrastructure and that can be used to assess the importance of different types of capital investments. It briefly considers how to define the portion of infrastructure that should be considered 'public'. The final two parts of the paper apply the proposed classification system to data on Canada's capital stock, and ask the following questions: how much infrastructure does Canada have and in which sectors of the economy is this infrastructure located? Finally, the paper investigates how Canada's infrastructure has evolved over the last four decades, both in the commercial and non-commercial sectors, and compares these trends with the pattern that can be found in the United States.

    Release date: 2008-03-12

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2008017
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the productivity program at Statistics Canada and a brief description of Canada's productivity performance. The paper defines productivity and the various measures that are used to investigate different aspects of productivity growth. It describes the difference between partial productivity measures (such as labour productivity) and a more complete measure (multifactor productivity) and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The paper explains why productivity is important. It outlines how productivity growth fits into the growth accounting framework and how this framework is used to examine the various sources of economic growth. The paper briefly discusses the challenges that face statisticians in measuring productivity growth. It also provides an overview of Canada's long-term productivity performance and compares Canada to the United States - both in terms of productivity levels and productivity growth rates.

    Release date: 2008-02-25

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007015
    Description:

    In this paper, we provide an international comparison of the growth in Canadian and U.S. manufacturing industries over the 1961-to-2003 period. We find that average annual growth rates of labour productivity growth were almost identical in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors during this period. But the sources of labour productivity growth differed in the two countries. Intermediate input deepening was a more important source of labour productivity growth in Canada than in the United States, while investment in capital and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth were more important in the United States than in Canada. After 1996, labour productivity growth in Canada was lower than in the United States. The post-1996 slower labour productivity growth in Canada relative to the United States was due to slower growth in MFP and slower growth in capital intensity. The slower MFP growth in Canada accounted for 60% of Canada - United States labour productivity growth difference, and slower growth in capital intensity accounted for 30%. The slower MFP growth in the Canadian manufacturing sector relative to that of the United States after 1996 was due to lower MFP growth in the computer and electronic products industry. The slower growth in capital'labour ratio in the Canadian manufacturing compared with the United States after 1996 is related to the changes in relative prices of capital and labour inputs in the two countries.

    Release date: 2007-12-18

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007014
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) of Statistics Canada maintain two multifactor productivity (MFP) programs.

    The Major Sector Multifactor Productivity Program develops the indexes of MFP for the total business sector and major industry groups in the business sector.

    The Industry Multifactor Productivity Program or the Industry KLEMS Productivity Program develops the industry productivity database that includes MFP indexes, output, capital (K), labour (L), energy (E), materials (M) and services (S) inputs for the individual industries of the business sector at various levels of industry aggregation. This paper describes the methodologies and data sources that are used to construct the major sector MFP indexes and the industry productivity database (or the KLEMS database). More specifically, this paper is meant to:provide a background of the major sector MFP program and the industry KLEMS productivity program;present the methodology for measuring MFP;describe the data sources and data available from the MFP programs;present a quality rating of the industry KLEMS productivity data; anddescribe the research agenda related to the MFP program.

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 1533
    Release date: 2007-11-29

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007010
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of the revisions to labour productivity estimates and related variables covering the revision cycle of the National Accounts from 2003 to 2006 for Canada and from 2004 to 2006 for the United States.

    Release date: 2007-11-27

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007012
    Description:

    This paper examines the various products associated with the quarterly labour productivity program. It outlines the nature of the volatility in the very short-run estimates and examines properties of the revisions made to the estimates of Canadian labour productivity and its components (gross domestic product and hours worked) since the inception of the program in 2001.

    Release date: 2007-10-18

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007011
    Description:

    This study examines Canadian productivity performance over the period 1961 to 2005. It investigates labour productivity growth and the sources of improvements therein-multifactor productivity growth, capital intensity, and skill upgrading. It also examines the contribution that productivity growth has made to economic growth, and to improvement on living standards. Finally, this study investigates the share of income going to labour, and the real hourly compensation of workers. This publication makes use of the new KLEMS database released on June 25, 2007 (http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/13-605-x/13-605-x2007005-eng.htm).

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007013
    Description:

    This paper compares long-run growth in labour productivity in Canada and the United States from 1961 to 2006. Over the entire period labour productivity in both countries grew at about the same rate. But Canadian growth exceeded that of the United States up to the early 1980s. Since then, U.S. labour productivity growth has exceeded Canadian growth. The gap has widened, particularly after 2000. The paper also decomposes labour productivity growth into three components' that arising from increases in capital intensity, from increases in the skill level of the labour force (due to changes in labour composition) and a residual (multifactor productivity growth). The first two components (both arising from investment, one in machinery and structures, the other in training) were more important in Canada. The third (the residual often referred to as technological progress) was larger in the United States.

    Release date: 2007-08-28

  • Technical products: 13-598-X
    Description:

    How does one summarize a lifetime of professional accomplishment? In some instances, one good way is to compile a book, as we have done here. This volume brings together in one place the substantial number of papers written by Kishori Lal during his lengthy career as a national accounts statistician at Statistics Canada.

    Kishori's papers cover a range of subject matter, responding to the twisting current of events through parts of five decades. They have one thing in common: All of the papers focus on one or another aspect of the development of Canada's System of National Accounts. Kishori believes deeply in and is utterly devoted to that system. It grew and evolved quite radically during Kishori's long career. The changes Canada's SNA went through followed closely, or in some cases led the development of the international SNA standard. He has left his mark indelibly on both.

    The advent of the 1993 SNA gave the impetus for several papers. These examined the implications of the new standard for Canada's national accounts and explored issues associated with its practical implementation in the 1997 historical revision. 'Production' was always a central focus of his work and many of the papers in this volume consider aspects of Canada's input-output accounts. Over the years he also turned his attention to several specific production measurement issues, such as the treatment of 'financial intermediation services indirectly measured' (FISIM) and inventory change. International comparisons were a special interest. Indeed one of his best papers, written in the year before he retired, contrasted the United States national accounts with the Canadian accounts. This detailed and authoritative paper was widely acclaimed south as well as north of the border. Subsequently the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicated they intended to prepare a similar paper, extending the comparison to include the Australian national accounts, and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in Paris asked if they could publish Kishori's work to give the study even wider exposure.

    Release date: 2007-06-21

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007009
    Description:

    This paper examines the effects of alternative specifications of the user costs of capital on the estimated price and volume indices of capital services. It asks how sensitive the results are to the use of exogenous versus endogenous rates of return, to alternate ways of including capital gains, and to whether corrections are made for tax rates. The paper also examines the effect of the various user cost formulae on the measured multifactor productivity growth.

    Release date: 2007-04-04

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007008
    Description:

    This study is the third in a series related to the project launched in fall 2003 by the Canadian Productivity Accounts of Statistics Canada in order to compare productivity levels between Canada and the United States. The study's purpose is to examine the comparability of the components of the labour market of these two countries that serve as the sources of the differences in the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita between them. This study can be subdivided into three sections. The first section develops and illustrates the conceptual and methodological framework required to make Canada/United States estimates of labour and population comparable in terms of level. The second section presents revisions and an update to 2005 of the GDP per capita differences and its components, which were presented for the first time in the study by Baldwin, Maynard and Wong (2005), which covered the period from 1994 to 2002, at the time.

    Lastly, using the year 2000 as an example, this study tries to quantify the "statistical error" that arises from using inadequate statistics or statistics not designed for this type of international comparison. This exercise reveals that the comparability of data on hours worked per job is especially crucial to identifying the origin of the differences in GDP per capita between labour productivity and hours worked per capita. The worst error involves comparing hours worked estimated from an employer survey with those obtained from a household survey. This type of comparison between Canada and the United States results in assigning an estimated 72% of the difference in GDP per capita to labour productivity when, in reality, it counted for barely 36% in 2000.

    Release date: 2007-03-26

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007005
    Description:

    This paper generates depreciation profiles for a diverse set of assets based on patterns of resale prices and retirements. In doing so, it explores the sensitivity of estimates of the growth in capital stock and capital services to alternate estimates of depreciation.

    In the first instance, survival analysis techniques are used to estimate changes in valuation of assets over the course of their service life. In the second instance, a two-step procedure is utilized that first estimates the discard function for used assets (assets discarded at zero prices) and then uses the resulting estimates to correct for selection bias that arises when just positive used-asset prices are employed to estimate age-price profiles to produce depreciation rates. For the third method, a discard function and an asset efficiency function are jointly specified and estimated.

    These three different methods produce depreciation profiles that follow convex patterns. Accelerated profiles are apparent for many individual assets in the machinery and equipment and structures classes.

    We also compare the ex post estimates of length of life that are based on outcomes to ex ante expected lives and find they are much the same. We therefore choose ex ante lives along with information from the ex post rates on the rate of decline in an asset's value to generate a set of depreciation rates for use in the productivity accounts.

    We then use our depreciation model to produce estimates of the growth in capital stock and capital services over the 1961 to 1996 period. We find that the resulting estimates of capital stock and capital services are quite similar to those previously produced.

    Release date: 2007-02-12

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007007
    Description:

    Productivity statistics garner much attention because they are key indicators of economic progress. This paper reports on the average growth in provincial labour productivity from 1997 to 2005. It examines how medium-term differences in productivity growth have affected the relative levels of labour productivity in different provinces. The data show that the relative position of most provinces has remained fairly stable over the 1997-to-2005 period when benchmarked against changes in the national average. The notable exception is Newfoundland and Labrador, which experienced much stronger average productivity growth during this period than other provinces. This growth substantially improved its relative labour productivity when evaluated in real terms.

    The paper also examines the effect that a second factor - changes in the prices received for products - has had on nominal productivity differences between provinces. The data show that the resource-rich provinces of Alberta and Newfoundland and Labrador have benefited substantially from higher relative prices.

    Release date: 2007-01-15

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007006
    Description:

    This paper employs the databases that are used to construct Statistics Canada's Productivity Accounts to examine the sources of growth in the Canadian economy and the history of productivity growth in Canada over the period 1961 to 2002. It makes use of a new time series using the North American Industry Classification System. The growth accounting system provides the framework for the analysis. This framework provides estimates of the relative importance of labour inputs, investments in capital, and productivity growth. The data that are required to address this issue also allow changes in the composition of capital and labour inputs to be investigated. In addition, the underlying factors that determine labour productivity (multifactor productivity, capital deepening, and increases in skill level) are outlined. Since the database is constructed at the industry level, all these relationships can be pursued both at the level of the total economy and for individual industries.

    Release date: 2007-01-12

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2006004
    Description:

    This paper provides a brief description of the methodology currently used to produce the annual volume of hours worked consistent with the System of National Accounts (SNA). These data are used for labour input in the annual and quarterly measures of labour productivity, as well as in the annual measures of multifactor productivity. For this purpose, hours worked are broken down by educational level and age group, so that changes in the composition of the labour force can be taken into account. They are also used to calculate hourly compensation and the unit labour cost and for simulations of the SNA Input-Output Model; as such, they are integrated as labour force inputs into most SNA satellite accounts (i.e., environment, tourism).

    Release date: 2006-10-27

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2006003
    Description:

    This paper examines the revision cycle for labour productivity estimates over the period 2001 to 2004.

    Release date: 2006-10-11

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2006002
    Description:

    This paper provides a concise overview in plain language of the concept of productivity by explaining its relevance and usefulness. This paper is intended for users of the Canadian Productivity Accounts who wish to learn more about productivity concepts, in simple terms.

    Release date: 2006-04-21

  • Technical products: 16-505-G
    Description:

    Part of Statistics Canada's Econnections: linking the environment and the economy statistical series, this publication describes in detail the conceptual frameworks, data sources and empirical methods used to compile the Canadian System of Environmental and Resource Accounts (CSERA). Designed to be compatible with the accounting frameworks of the System of National Accounts, the CSERA allows users to easily analyze the linkages between economic activity and the environment in terms of material and energy flows, environmental expenditures and natural resource stocks. This publication will be of interest to researchers in both the economic and environmental fields who want to familiarize themselves with the accounting concepts of the CSERA. It is a companion volume to Environment-economy indicators and detailed statistics (catalogue no. 16-200-XKE), another product in the Econnections series.

    Release date: 2006-04-12

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