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Analysis (526)

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  • Journals and periodicals: 13-605-X
    Description:

    This product contains articles related to the latest methodological, conceptual developments in the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts as well as the analysis of the Canadian economy. It includes articles detailing new methods, concepts and statistical techniques used to compile the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts. It also includes information related to new or expanded data products, provides updates and supplements to information found in various guides and analytical articles touching upon a broad range of topics related to the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2017-12-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-627-M
    Description:

    Every year, Statistics Canada collects data from hundreds of surveys. As the amount of data gathered increases, Statistics Canada has introduced infographics to help people, business owners, academics, and management at all levels, understand key information derived from the data. Infographics can be used to quickly communicate a message, to simplify the presentation of large amounts of data, to see data patterns and relationships, and to monitor changes in variables over time.

    These infographics will provide a quick overview of Statistics Canada survey data.

    Release date: 2017-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154883
    Description:

    The Broad Economic Categories (BEC) classification provides users with a new perspective on Canada’s imports and exports. A key feature of the BEC classification is an end-use aggregating structure that is consistent with the three basic classes of goods in the System of National Accounts (SNA), namely, capital goods, intermediate goods, consumption goods. This aggregating structure facilitates the analysis of external trade statistics with other economic data such as industry statistics and national economic account aggregates such as gross domestic product. Imports and exports classified by Broad Economic Categories provide insight into the role of imports and exports as inputs into production, as a source of capital and as a source of goods for final consumption. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of Canada’s external trade according to these national account classes of goods.

    Release date: 2017-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154890
    Description:

    Canada exports over $500 billion worth of merchandise trade annually. This reliance on foreign markets contributes undeniably to Canadian economic activity. However, there are a number of ways of analyzing Canada’s international trade, beyond simply measuring dollar values. One way, that often receives little attention, is to look at the degree of export diversification. Simply put, does an economy have one large customer or multiple customers, or does a country export one product or multiple products?

    Release date: 2017-12-11

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-06

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-04

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-01

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154882
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) covering the period 2014 to 2016 have been released. These revised estimates incorporate the most current source data and seasonal patterns.

    Release date: 2017-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154881
    Description:

    Canada’s society and economy continue to grow and evolve. Statistics Canada strives to keep its programs up to date with changing trends and circumstances to ensure Canadians are well informed about current developments. This means Statistics Canada has to innovate and invest in the statistical system continuously. The prospective legalization of cannabis means Statistics Canada needs to start preparing Canada’s statistical system to capture the associated economic and social implications.

    Release date: 2017-12-01

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-22

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-626-X
    Description:

    Articles in the Economic Insights series highlight issues related to the growth and development of Canada's economy. In some cases, these articles synthesize the results of previous research carried out by Statistics Canada; in others, they provide contextual information that accompanies the release of new data. The Economic Insights series features concise examinations of economic events, trends, and important structural changes in the economy.

    Release date: 2017-11-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-631-X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada engages regularly with Canadians to discuss statistical findings about the country’s economy, society and environment. Events are held in various cities throughout the year to discuss the use of statistics in many fields. These events provide Statistics Canada with an opportunity to promote the role of official statistics and better understand data users’ needs.

    This series provides online access to the presentations that were made at outreach events with data users.

    Release date: 2017-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017006
    Description:

    For the modern operator, farming has evolved into an innovative career requiring knowledge of business management and technology, and, more than ever, agricultural sciences.

    Driven by competition and aided by technology, the number of Canadian agricultural operations is decreasing as the operations become larger, more complex and capital intensive. Farms are taking advantage of innovation through marketing strategies, processes and product offerings in order to exploit new markets and cut costs.

    This presentation highlights the new ways in which Statistics Canada is integrating data from multiple sources in order to reduce the burden on farmers and to make information more relevant and timely for agro-businesses and analysts.

    Release date: 2017-11-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-08

Reference (148)

Reference (148) (25 of 148 results)

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2005001
    Description:

    This study examines Canadian productivity performance over the period 1961-2004. It investigates labour productivity growth and the sources of improvements therein-multifactor productivity growth, capital intensity, and skill upgrading. It also examines the contribution that productivity growth has made to economic growth, and to improvement on living standards. Finally, this study investigates the share of income going to labour, and the real hourly compensation of workers.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Technical products: 11F0024M2005000
    Description:

    The theme for this year focuses on, economic growth, the creation of wealth and sustainable development. In our rapidly changing economy the need for innovative solutions and creative research is increasingly important. As our global community constantly evolves we need to understand the social and economic forces which affect us all.

    The Economic Conference 2006 theme touches on several aspects of Canada's economic and social life and is addressed in four sub-themes. Authors are invited to submit papers on topics related to one of the sub-themes listed below:

    1. Innovation, Productivity and Investment: Business cycle; technological change; industrial organization; infrastructure; business practices; information and communication technology; eco-efficiency.

    2. Human, Social and Natural Capital: Aging; immigration; children; families; income distributions and low-income; social cohesion; social exclusion; literacy and other skills sets; health; education and learning; geographic mobility, natural resources and energy use; resource accounting.

    3. Global Interdependence, Emerging Markets and Regional Issues: trade; integration; multinationals; foreign direct investment; exchange rates; balance of payments; cities and smaller communities; threats to trade and development.

    4. Market and Social Outcomes: employment and unemployment; earnings and wages; outsourcing; social change; job stability and work activities.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2005075
    Description:

    This paper presents research carried out to determine the competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing industry and investigates the competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing industry from the perspective of output price, market structure, and productivity performance. The main objective of the research is to estimate the degree of competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing sector related to its U.S. counterpart during the ten-year period from 1991 to 2001.

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Technical products: 11F0026M
    Description:

    The Economic Analysis Methodology Paper Series circulates information on definitions employed, standards used, procedures followed and evaluations of the quality of the economic statistics produced by the System of National Accounts (SNA). These papers can be downloaded free at www.statcan.gc.ca.

    Release date: 2005-08-30

  • Technical products: 11F0026M2005005
    Description:

    The aim of this paper is to describe the actual methodology used to estimate annual hours worked by industry and province in Canada in view to be consistent with the System of National Accounts.

    Release date: 2005-08-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 1529
    Release date: 2005-05-25

  • Technical products: 11F0026M2005004
    Description:

    A statistical agency faces several challenges in building Productivity Accounts. Measures of productivity require that outputs be compared to inputs.

    This paper discusses the challenges that a statistical agency faces in this area -as illustrated by the Canadian experience. First, it examines the progress that has been made in developing a system that integrates the Productivity Accounts into the overall System of National Accounts. It also discusses deficiencies that still need to be overcome. Finally, the paper focuses on the need to consider whether the SNA manual should be extended into the area of productivity measurement. The paper argues that the advantage of integrating productivity accounts into the general accounts is sufficiently great that it is time to include more detail on the nature of productivity accounts in the general SNA framework.

    Release date: 2005-04-28

  • Technical products: 11F0026M2005003
    Description:

    This paper examines the revision cycle for labour productivity estimates over the period 2000-2003.

    Release date: 2005-03-10

  • Technical products: 15-002-M2001001
    Description:

    This document describes the sources, concepts and methods utilized by the Canadian Productivity Accounts and discusses how they compare with their U.S. counterparts.

    Release date: 2004-12-24

  • Technical products: 11F0024M2004000
    Description:

    The accelerating pace of technological, environmental and social change presents new challenges for the economy and society. Meeting these challenges requires their clear identification, accurate measurement and full understanding. Insightful research plays a key role in this process.

    On June 7 and 8, 2004, Statistics Canada will hold its fifteenth annual Economic conference. The Economic conference will bring together researchers from business, government, research and labour communities to shed light on current economic and social issues. This event will provide a stimulating and challenging environment for presenters and participants alike, promoting the exchange of ideas while subjecting empirical, theoretical and data issues to critical assessment.

    The Economic conference 2004 is your opportunity to sample new research, examine the latest ideas, engage in discussion and acquire new insights. The conference program brings together experts in the field of socio-economic research from across Canada and other countries to look at emerging issues in today's economy and society.

    The Economic conference 2004 will include several plenary sessions featuring invited guest speakers who are leading authorities in their fields. It will also include presentations in which participants will discuss research, providing new perspectives on topics related to one of the sub-themes listed below: - Economic growth - The changing face of Canada - The environment and economic activity - Infrastructure

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007449
    Description:

    The state and local government sector owns nearly 90% of the nonmilitary capital structures and 70% of the nonmilitary equipment in the U.S. As such state and local governments are the key policymakers in determining levels of infrastructure investment. Yet as stewards of infrastructure, the states have had a rocky history. Current engineering studies examining the condition of U.S. capital stock suggest that much of it is disrepair and that investments of nearly $1.6 trillion would be needed over the next 5 years to restore full functionality to major types of infrastructure.

    Recently states have shown renewed interest in using capital investment in infrastructure as an economic development tool. Popular economic development theories based on enhancing industry agglomeration often find the condition of key infrastructure as a factor in economic growth. While many states accept this conclusion, they are faced with a policy conundrum. Facing tight fiscal circumstances, states and localities are trying to determine which infrastructure investments matter in triggering economic growth. This paper will survey what is known about measuring the effect of infrastructure investment and discuss whether states are asking the right questions before spending infrastructure dollars.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007455
    Description:

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the levels and trends in the industrial diversity of Canadian cities over the past 10 years (1992 to 2002), a period of significant structural change in the Canadian economy. Diverse cities are thought to be more stable and provide better environments that lead to stronger economic growth. Using detailed establishment-level data on businesses from the entire spectrum of small to large Canadian cities, the study shows that diversity levels vary significantly across cities, with the most populous cities being far more diverse than the least. Although there is a strong positive relationship between diversity and the population of a city, relatively small cities (those with a population around 100,000) can achieve levels of diversity that are near that of the largest urban centres. Consequently, most Canadians live in relatively diverse urban economic environments. Generally, the level of diversity of Canadian cities has increased over time. This has been particularly true of small cites with populations of less than 100,000. The largest cities have experienced declining diversity levels.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007448
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the contribution of public capital to productivity growth in the Canadian business sector. The approach developed here incorporates demand and supply forces, including the contribution of public capital, which may affect productivity performance. We estimate the model using disaggregated data composed of 37-industries in the Canadian business sector from 1961 to 2000. The results indicate that the main contributors to productivity growth, both at the industry and aggregate levels, are technical change and exogenous demand (representing the effect of aggregate income and population growth). Public capital contributed for about 18% of the overall business sector multifactor productivity growth over the 1961 to 2000 period. This is somewhat lower than the figures reported in the literature. However, the magnitudes of the contribution of public capital to productivity growth vary significantly across industries, with the largest impact occurring in transportation, trade and utilities.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007450
    Description:

    The manufacturing sector is a vital part of the Canadian economy. In 2002, it accounted for $165 billion of Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) and more than two million jobs. Unlike the other G7 countries, the contribution of the manufacturing sector to the Canadian economy has been increasing.

    From 1997 to 2002, average labour productivity growth in the manufacturing was slightly lower than the average for all industries. Part of this could be explained by the relatively low capital investment in the sector.

    In 2001, the R&D expenditure by the manufacturing sector represented 70 percent of all industrial R&D expenditures. The R&D intensity for the sector is about four times greater than that of all industries in Canada.

    The manufacturing sector has driven much of Canada's trade. In 2002, manufacturing exports accounted for 64 percent of Canada's total exports of goods and services. The sector became much more export dependent but Canada's overall manufacturing trade balance was negative. Nevertheless, Canada's manufacturing sector has been a success story.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0026M2004002
    Description:

    This paper discusses the productivity program at Statistics Canada, covering topics such as international efforts to provide more comparable statistics, attempts to expand our knowledge of the factors behind productivity growth, and challenges facing the program.

    Release date: 2004-08-06

  • Technical products: 11F0026M2004001
    Description:

    This paper describes how the analytical program of Statistics Canada's productivity group is used to enhance the quality (relevance, coherence, interpretability) of its products.

    Release date: 2004-07-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 67-001-X20030036827
    Description:

    The reconciled estimates are intended to show how the current account estimates would appear if both countries used the same definitions, methodologies, and data sources.

    Release date: 2004-03-02

  • Technical products: 13F0031M
    Description:

    This series includes four reports which are the first set of documents relating to the changes made in the The 1997 historical revision of the Canadian System of National Accounts.

    Release date: 2003-06-20

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2003010
    Description:

    This document provides compilers and users in Canada and the United States with a fuller understanding of the present practices, similarities and differences between the two national accounts systems. This will enable users to make meaningful comparisons of the published national accounts data. This report is the result of the co-operation between professionals of the two countries in trying to harmonize and improve the respective national accounts, and hopefully, in due course, international standards.

    Release date: 2003-06-20

  • Technical products: 15-547-X
    Description:

    Like most statistical agencies, Statistics Canada publishes three Gross Domestic Product (GDP) series. These are the output-based GDP, the income-based GDP and the expenditure-based GDP. This document is aimed at describing the concepts, definitions, classifications and statistical methods underlying the output-based GDP series, also known as GDP by industry or simply monthly GDP.

    The report is organized into seven chapters. Chapter 1 defines what GDP by industry is, describes its various uses and how it connects with the other components of the Canadian System of National Accounts. Chapter 2 deals with the calculation of the GDP by industry estimates. Chapter 3 examines industry and commodity classification schemes. Chapter 4 discusses the subject of deflation. The choice of deflators, the role of the base year and the method of rebasing are all addressed in this chapter. Chapter 5 looks at such technical issues as benchmarking, trading day and seasonal adjustment. Chapter 6 is devoted to the presentation of the GDP by industry, detailing the format, release dates and modes of dissemination, as well as the need and the frequency of revising the estimates. Finally, Chapter 7 reviews the historical development of monthly GDP from 1926 to the present.

    Release date: 2002-11-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5010
    Release date: 2002-09-11

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2001009
    Description:

    The work on Input-output (IO) tables in Canada started in the early 1960s. At the very beginning, it was decided that IO tables must fulfill several roles and provide: (a) an audit and management tool to improve economic statistics for their consistency, accuracy and comprehensiveness; (b) benchmarks for gross domestic product (GDP), its income side and components, its expenditures side and components and GDP by industry estimates, both at current prices and constant prices and (c) a framework for structural analysis.

    Release date: 2001-04-10

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2001008
    Description:

    Under any degree of inflation, high or low, the values of changes in inventories (VPC) is generally different when it is calculated at the quarterly interval and the four quarters are aggregated into a year compared with its calculation done at the yearly interval. It is argued in this paper that it is an inherent problem as one of the basic axioms of annual accounts is violated, namely, the assumption of price homogeneity over an accounting period.

    Release date: 2001-03-16

  • Technical products: 15F0077G
    Description:

    This publication provides a description of the data sources and methods used to compile the input-output tables at constant prices. It includes a brief description of the accounting framework, an overview of the methods used for the major components of the tables and an outline of the techniques applied to each group of goods and services. It also distinguishes between the derivation of the gross domestic product by industry for the business sector and that of the non-business sector. Finally, it discusses some of the critical contemporary issues that are being addressed at the time of writing.

    Release date: 2001-02-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 67-001-X20000035465
    Description:

    This article presents the results of the reconciliation of the bilateral current account estimates of Canada and the United States for 1998 and 1999.

    Release date: 2001-01-29

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