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All (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014849
    Description:

    This chapter is designed to provide the reader with insight into how economic circumstances change over time as people move from working age into, and through, the 'old age' phase of the life cycle. Patterns of change in incomes, levels of consumption, saving or dissaving, as well as other variables are presented in the paper. The level of peak lifetime after-tax income, which was previously attained when the average age of a birth cohort was in the early sixties or late fifties, is now reached when the cohort's average age is in the early fifties. Although the peak has shifted, real incomes have tended to rise from earlier to later cohorts. However, real incomes within a cohort tend to fall sharply as the cohort ages and moves into its sixties and seventies. There is a minor tendency for consumption to decline by less than income as cohorts age. On average, older Canadian households continue to save, and thus increase rather than use up their accumulated wealth, at least into their seventies. A large proportion continue to own their own homes, and most do so free of mortgages. However, lower-income households do not continue to save, and in fact tend to use up their accumulated wealth at older ages, if they have any to use up. The authors emphasize that inflation is a major concern for older cohorts and estimate that a pension without inflation protection commencing at age 65 would almost certainly suffer a loss of purchasing power in excess of 35% by the time the recipient was 80. And with longer life expectancy, cohorts will be subjected to longer periods of exposure to high inflation risks.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990044757
    Description:

    The recent increase in exports' share of GDP has been exceptional. Imports have mirrored the trend in exports, with trade across the U.S. border being the driving force for both. Using Statistics Canada's Input-Output tables, this article explores the issue of some goods moving back and forth across the border at various stages of processing. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer published in November 1999).

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M1999036
    Description:

    Recent economic trends, including expanding globalization of trade (as evidenced by new trade agreements), volatility in market exchange rates, and greater interest in international comparisons of real income and productivity are generating increased interest in intercountry comparisons. These comparisons are made in real terms derived from purchasing power parities (PPPs). In Canada, a particularly important relationship with the United States focusses attention on US/Canada comparative price and volume measures. This article includes updated annual bilateral volume indexes of real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita and its components for the United States, compared with Canada, and the associated PPPs.

    Release date: 1999-11-30

  • Table: 13-001-X19990034873
    Description:

    This article includes updated annual bilateral volume indexes of real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita and its components for the United States compared to Canada, and the associated purchasing price parities (PPPs).

    Release date: 1999-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014743
    Description:

    International tourism is one of the fastest-growing industries in the world. Over the past ten years, the number of international arrivals at national borders has increased at an average annual rate of 5.2%, reaching 611 million in 1997.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M1999019
    Description:

    This paper looks at the feasibility of providing estimates of foreign direct investment by province.

    Release date: 1999-08-04

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111305
    Description:

    The data contained in this section for the most part relate only to the revenues, expenditures and debt of the federal, provincial and municipal governments proper. The first part of the chapter contains information on the finances of the federal government from Confederation to 1975. The second part contains information on the finances of all governments for various years since 1933 to 1975. The final part of the chapter contains miscellaneous data relating to various aspects of governmental finance.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111304
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this section are in three major divisions. The first of these, series G1-151, cover private and official estimates of the balance of payments on current and capital account from 1900 to 1975. This subsection is itself divided into three parts: series G1-56 contain the estimates of the balance of payments of Professors Jacob Viner and Frank Knox for the period 1900 to 1926; series G57-83 contain the official estimates of the balance of payments, current account, prepared by Statistics Canada (formerly Dominion Bureau of Statistics) for the period 1926 to 1975; series G84-152 contain the official estimates of the balance of payments, capital account for 1926 to 1975.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111303
    Description:

    The statistical data of this section are in five subsections. They contain data on national income and expenditure and related aggregates from 1926 to 1976 in series F1-152; on income produced, by industry, from 1919 to 1926 and on gross capital formation from 1901 to 1930 in series F153-182; on the stock of tangible capital from 1926 onwards in series F183-220 and on inventory book values in series F221-224; on real gross domestic product by industry in series F225-240; and on indexes of labour productivity in series F241-294.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998006
    Description:

    Many rural communities are searching for ways to stimulate local economic growth. Some factors are unique to a particular time and place. But are there other factors that will foster growth over time? The purpose of this bulletin is to review some of the factors associated with local economic growth.

    Release date: 1999-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M1999018
    Description:

    This paper provides a reconciliation of the current account of the balance of payments for Canada and the United States to reflect how the estimates would appear if both countries used common definitions, methodologies and data sources.

    Release date: 1999-04-20

  • Table: 52-216-X19970004457
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the results of preliminary research into the use of a potentially new economic indicator for Gross Domestic Product (GDP) - railway carloadings.

    Release date: 1999-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990014408
    Description:

    Seasonality is an important issue because it can add a burden to the economy. The short-term use of seasonal labour is a more costly process than a steady use of labour throughout the year. This article reviews the change in seasonal employment patterns over the past two decades, and looks at how various industries, dempgraphic groups and regions have been affected.

    Release date: 1999-03-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 67-001-X19980034330
    Description:

    This article presents the results of the reconciliation of the bilateral current account estimates of Canada and the United States for 1996 and 1997.

    Release date: 1999-01-15

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014849
    Description:

    This chapter is designed to provide the reader with insight into how economic circumstances change over time as people move from working age into, and through, the 'old age' phase of the life cycle. Patterns of change in incomes, levels of consumption, saving or dissaving, as well as other variables are presented in the paper. The level of peak lifetime after-tax income, which was previously attained when the average age of a birth cohort was in the early sixties or late fifties, is now reached when the cohort's average age is in the early fifties. Although the peak has shifted, real incomes have tended to rise from earlier to later cohorts. However, real incomes within a cohort tend to fall sharply as the cohort ages and moves into its sixties and seventies. There is a minor tendency for consumption to decline by less than income as cohorts age. On average, older Canadian households continue to save, and thus increase rather than use up their accumulated wealth, at least into their seventies. A large proportion continue to own their own homes, and most do so free of mortgages. However, lower-income households do not continue to save, and in fact tend to use up their accumulated wealth at older ages, if they have any to use up. The authors emphasize that inflation is a major concern for older cohorts and estimate that a pension without inflation protection commencing at age 65 would almost certainly suffer a loss of purchasing power in excess of 35% by the time the recipient was 80. And with longer life expectancy, cohorts will be subjected to longer periods of exposure to high inflation risks.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990044757
    Description:

    The recent increase in exports' share of GDP has been exceptional. Imports have mirrored the trend in exports, with trade across the U.S. border being the driving force for both. Using Statistics Canada's Input-Output tables, this article explores the issue of some goods moving back and forth across the border at various stages of processing. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer published in November 1999).

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M1999036
    Description:

    Recent economic trends, including expanding globalization of trade (as evidenced by new trade agreements), volatility in market exchange rates, and greater interest in international comparisons of real income and productivity are generating increased interest in intercountry comparisons. These comparisons are made in real terms derived from purchasing power parities (PPPs). In Canada, a particularly important relationship with the United States focusses attention on US/Canada comparative price and volume measures. This article includes updated annual bilateral volume indexes of real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita and its components for the United States, compared with Canada, and the associated PPPs.

    Release date: 1999-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014743
    Description:

    International tourism is one of the fastest-growing industries in the world. Over the past ten years, the number of international arrivals at national borders has increased at an average annual rate of 5.2%, reaching 611 million in 1997.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M1999019
    Description:

    This paper looks at the feasibility of providing estimates of foreign direct investment by province.

    Release date: 1999-08-04

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998006
    Description:

    Many rural communities are searching for ways to stimulate local economic growth. Some factors are unique to a particular time and place. But are there other factors that will foster growth over time? The purpose of this bulletin is to review some of the factors associated with local economic growth.

    Release date: 1999-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M1999018
    Description:

    This paper provides a reconciliation of the current account of the balance of payments for Canada and the United States to reflect how the estimates would appear if both countries used common definitions, methodologies and data sources.

    Release date: 1999-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990014408
    Description:

    Seasonality is an important issue because it can add a burden to the economy. The short-term use of seasonal labour is a more costly process than a steady use of labour throughout the year. This article reviews the change in seasonal employment patterns over the past two decades, and looks at how various industries, dempgraphic groups and regions have been affected.

    Release date: 1999-03-03

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

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