Statistics by subject – Economic accounts

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Author(s)

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Author(s)

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (33)

All (33) (25 of 33 results)

Data (30)

Data (30) (25 of 30 results)

Analysis (2)

Analysis (2) (2 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035372
    Description:

    Some taxes may be higher, some lower than in other developed nations, but overall Canada's effective tax rate is middle-of-the-road. Using OECD data, this study compares several tax-t0-GDP ratios of the G-7 and the 29 OECD countires.

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20000018519
    Description:

    With the release of the first quarter 2000 of the National Income and Expenditure Accounts the sectoring of federal and provincial government, non-autonomous pension plans has changed. These pension plans are now part of the personal sector. Previously these plans were included in either the federal or provincial government sector accounts.

    Release date: 2000-05-31

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2000002
    Description:

    This paper deals with a problem in internationally comparable economic statistics, namely, the fact that countries measure value added by industry differently. The economic measure, value added, is important both in its own right and because it is a component of other economic measures such as productivity. Value added by industry measures the additional value created by a production process. This additional value, created by factors of production such as labour and capital, may be calculated either before or after deducting the consumption of fixed capital used in production. Thus, gross value added by industry is the value of its output of goods and services less the value of its intermediate consumption of goods and services and net value added as the value of output less the values of both intermediate consumption and consumption of fixed capital.

    Release date: 2000-04-04

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: