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All (29) (25 of 29 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001180
    Description:

    This study examines provincial differences in productivity (GDP per job) using decomposition and regression analysis. In the first stage of the study, the relative size of productivity differences across provinces is examined. Then, these differences are decomposed into two components - the first is the portion of the difference that arises from industry-mix, and the second is due to "real" productivity differences at the industry level. The paper also examines the contributions of the "new" and "old" economy sectors to differences in provincial productivity. Finally, regression analysis is performed in order to determine the statistical significance of interprovincial productivity differences. The paper finds that British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario and Quebec do not differ significantly from another in terms of GDP per job after differences in industry mix are considered. Manitoba and the Atlantic Provinces lag behind the others. Most of the difference in the latter two cases stems from "real" differences at the industry level rather than from the effect of differences in industry mix. The Natural Resources sector plays an important role in bolstering the performance of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

    Release date: 2001-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015956
    Description:

    In 1999, Canada's travel account balance (including passenger fares), the difference between the expenditures of foreign visitors in the country and those of Canadian residents outside the country, measured its lowest deficit since 1988, declining to $3.0 billion.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M2001021
    Description:

    This paper examines some of the fundamental issues behind foreign affiliate trade statistics (FATS), including what they are, who needs them and why they have become so important, and Statistics Canada's plan for collecting FATS.

    Release date: 2001-10-11

  • Table: 13-009-X20010025894
    Description:

    In 1994, Statistics Canada published its first estimates of a Tourism Satellite Account (TSA) for the 1988 reference year. In all subsequent work, there has been an ongoing concern on the part of Canadian national accountants with respect to the need for regular updates to the TSA. This article marks the completion of the work involved in updating the TSA for the 1992 reference year and the revisions made to the 1988 year. An analysis of the results as well as a discussion of the structural changes between the two reference years is presented in this paper. In addition, the underlying reasons for the revisions to the previously published 1988 estimates are discussed. A section is also devoted to future developments currently under consideration in the Canadian context, in particular those relating to the development of provincial TSAs for the 1996 reference year.

    Release date: 2001-10-04

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010018513
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Capitalization of software.

    Release date: 2001-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010028518
    Description:

    As of September 28, 2001 the annual revision of monthly GDP by industry estimates will include major classification and conceptual changes: Adoption of NAICS.

    Release date: 2001-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010028517
    Description:

    As of September 28, 2001 the annual revision of monthly GDP by industry estimates will include major classification and conceptual changes: Change in valuation from factor cost to basic prices.

    Release date: 2001-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010085881
    Description:

    This article offers some historical perspective on industrial strife in Canada, for example, the number of strikes and lockouts and workdays lost over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M2001020
    Description:

    This paper offers a Canadian viewpoint of globalization by presenting the concepts and main trends of foreign direct investment issues.

    Release date: 2001-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2002037
    Description:

    A new accounting approach treats software as an investment was implemented in the Canadian System of National Accounts (SNA) during 2001. Preliminary estimates of software capital stocks were included for the first time in the National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA) released in March 2001. Software investment was then included in the gross domestic product (GDP) with the first quarter 2001 release (May 31, 2001) of the National Economic and Financial Accounts (NEFA). Later in the year, it was included in the Input-Output (I/O) Accounts, Provincial Economic Accounts (PEA) and the Industry Measures Accounts (IMA) with the release of October 30, 2001.

    This mini historical revision brings Canada in line with a number of countries, including the United States and other G-7 member nations, who introduced software into their GDP over the last few years. It also brings Canada in line with the 1993 SNA recommendation that business and government acquisition of software be treated in national accounts as an investment as opposed to a current expense. Software is now treated like any other capital input that is used repeatedly in production over a year or more whereas, formerly, it was treated as if it were fully used up during the production period like any other intermediate input. This new accounting for software has raised the level of GDP, although the effects on GDP growth turn out to be relatively small.

    Release date: 2001-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010018515
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Adoption of NAICS for estimates of labour income.

    Release date: 2001-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010018529
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Chain Fisher formula.

    Release date: 2001-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010018514
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Change in valuation from factor cost to basic prices.

    Release date: 2001-05-31

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2001009
    Description:

    The work on Input-output (IO) tables in Canada started in the early 1960s. At the very beginning, it was decided that IO tables must fulfill several roles and provide: (a) an audit and management tool to improve economic statistics for their consistency, accuracy and comprehensiveness; (b) benchmarks for gross domestic product (GDP), its income side and components, its expenditures side and components and GDP by industry estimates, both at current prices and constant prices and (c) a framework for structural analysis.

    Release date: 2001-04-10

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2001008
    Description:

    Under any degree of inflation, high or low, the values of changes in inventories (VPC) is generally different when it is calculated at the quarterly interval and the four quarters are aggregated into a year compared with its calculation done at the yearly interval. It is argued in this paper that it is an inherent problem as one of the basic axioms of annual accounts is violated, namely, the assumption of price homogeneity over an accounting period.

    Release date: 2001-03-16

  • Table: 16-200-X
    Description:

    Part of Statistics Canada's Econnections: linking the environment and the economy statistical series, this product consists of a printed publication combined with a CD-ROM. The product offers summary indicators plus detailed statistics that quantify the relationship between economic activity and the environment. Information is presented for issues ranging from greenhouse gas emissions, water and energy use, to natural resource wealth, environmental expenditures and beyond. The printed publication provides convenient reference to the summary indicators, including analysis of important trends, while the CD-ROM offers straightforward access to dozens of detailed statistical tables that underlie the indicators. An electronic version of the printed publication is included on the CD-ROM and each indicator in the publication is hypertext linked to a group of related statistical tables, allowing the user to easily select detailed statistics for viewing in association with any given indicator. Simple analysis of the statistics can be done directly within the CD-ROM's software. For those who carry out more complex analysis, downloading of data from the CD-ROM in standard spreadsheet format is easily accomplished.

    Release date: 2001-02-23

  • Table: 13-594-G
    Description:

    This guide provides indicators that are used to monitor supply, demand and employment for tourism in Canada on a timely basis. The guide provides information on the methods used to derive the supply, demand and employment indicators. It also provides information on the seasonal adjustment method and the derivation of constant dollar series. This guide was commissioned by the Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC), following a pilot project providing quarterly and annual updates for the Tourism Satellite Account (TSA 1988).

    Release date: 2001-02-21

  • Technical products: 15F0077G
    Description:

    This publication provides a description of the data sources and methods used to compile the input-output tables at constant prices. It includes a brief description of the accounting framework, an overview of the methods used for the major components of the tables and an outline of the techniques applied to each group of goods and services. It also distinguishes between the derivation of the gross domestic product by industry for the business sector and that of the non-business sector. Finally, it discusses some of the critical contemporary issues that are being addressed at the time of writing.

    Release date: 2001-02-15

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005493
    Description:

    This chapter looks at how exact productivity estimates are.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005494
    Description:

    This chapter examines long-run productivity growth trends in the Canadian and U.S. business and manufacturing sectors, and short-run growth in labour productivity.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005495
    Description:

    This chapter examines productivity growth in manufacturing by size of establishment and by whether it is Canadian- or foreign-owned.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005496
    Description:

    This chapter examines the effects of the long-run decline in Canada's savings rate on investment spending and, in turn, productivity.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005492
    Description:

    This chapter explores whether the Canadian economy is restructuring toward higher productivity industries, and whether, at the industry level, productivity growth is passed on to consumers in the form of lower prices or to workers in the form of higher wages.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005498
    Description:

    This chapter measures the effect of modifying the standard productivity growth framework to remove the effects of economies of scale.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005491
    Description:

    This chapter examines how productivity growth is measured, long- and short-run trends in productivity growth, the importance of productivity for economic growth and the contribution of productivity growth to the standard of living.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

Data (13)

Data (13) (13 of 13 results)

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001180
    Description:

    This study examines provincial differences in productivity (GDP per job) using decomposition and regression analysis. In the first stage of the study, the relative size of productivity differences across provinces is examined. Then, these differences are decomposed into two components - the first is the portion of the difference that arises from industry-mix, and the second is due to "real" productivity differences at the industry level. The paper also examines the contributions of the "new" and "old" economy sectors to differences in provincial productivity. Finally, regression analysis is performed in order to determine the statistical significance of interprovincial productivity differences. The paper finds that British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario and Quebec do not differ significantly from another in terms of GDP per job after differences in industry mix are considered. Manitoba and the Atlantic Provinces lag behind the others. Most of the difference in the latter two cases stems from "real" differences at the industry level rather than from the effect of differences in industry mix. The Natural Resources sector plays an important role in bolstering the performance of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

    Release date: 2001-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015956
    Description:

    In 1999, Canada's travel account balance (including passenger fares), the difference between the expenditures of foreign visitors in the country and those of Canadian residents outside the country, measured its lowest deficit since 1988, declining to $3.0 billion.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M2001021
    Description:

    This paper examines some of the fundamental issues behind foreign affiliate trade statistics (FATS), including what they are, who needs them and why they have become so important, and Statistics Canada's plan for collecting FATS.

    Release date: 2001-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010018513
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Capitalization of software.

    Release date: 2001-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010028518
    Description:

    As of September 28, 2001 the annual revision of monthly GDP by industry estimates will include major classification and conceptual changes: Adoption of NAICS.

    Release date: 2001-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010028517
    Description:

    As of September 28, 2001 the annual revision of monthly GDP by industry estimates will include major classification and conceptual changes: Change in valuation from factor cost to basic prices.

    Release date: 2001-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010085881
    Description:

    This article offers some historical perspective on industrial strife in Canada, for example, the number of strikes and lockouts and workdays lost over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M2001020
    Description:

    This paper offers a Canadian viewpoint of globalization by presenting the concepts and main trends of foreign direct investment issues.

    Release date: 2001-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2002037
    Description:

    A new accounting approach treats software as an investment was implemented in the Canadian System of National Accounts (SNA) during 2001. Preliminary estimates of software capital stocks were included for the first time in the National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA) released in March 2001. Software investment was then included in the gross domestic product (GDP) with the first quarter 2001 release (May 31, 2001) of the National Economic and Financial Accounts (NEFA). Later in the year, it was included in the Input-Output (I/O) Accounts, Provincial Economic Accounts (PEA) and the Industry Measures Accounts (IMA) with the release of October 30, 2001.

    This mini historical revision brings Canada in line with a number of countries, including the United States and other G-7 member nations, who introduced software into their GDP over the last few years. It also brings Canada in line with the 1993 SNA recommendation that business and government acquisition of software be treated in national accounts as an investment as opposed to a current expense. Software is now treated like any other capital input that is used repeatedly in production over a year or more whereas, formerly, it was treated as if it were fully used up during the production period like any other intermediate input. This new accounting for software has raised the level of GDP, although the effects on GDP growth turn out to be relatively small.

    Release date: 2001-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010018515
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Adoption of NAICS for estimates of labour income.

    Release date: 2001-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010018529
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Chain Fisher formula.

    Release date: 2001-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20010018514
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Change in valuation from factor cost to basic prices.

    Release date: 2001-05-31

Reference (4)

Reference (4) (4 of 4 results)

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