Statistics by subject – Economic accounts

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (36)

All (36) (25 of 36 results)

  • Technical products: 15-002-M2001001
    Description:

    This document describes the sources, concepts and methods utilized by the Canadian Productivity Accounts and discusses how they compare with their U.S. counterparts.

    Release date: 2004-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M2004022
    Description:

    Canada's balance of payments with the United States should be, in principle, the mirror image of the U.S. balance of payments with Canada. In practice, however, the two countries' statistics have conceptual, methodological and data differences.

    Each year, the two countries' balance of payments current accounts are reconciled to reflect how the estimates would appear if both countries used common definitions, methodologies and data sources. Such reconciliation is important because of the extensive economic links between the two countries and the need to explain differences in their published official bilateral estimates.

    Release date: 2004-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040127744
    Description:

    Recent media reports suggest that the ratio of gross national income (formerly gross national product) to gross domestic product reflects a nation's 'economic maturity'. Nations at a higher stage of economic development generally have a GNI larger than GDP because of their past investments abroad. Less developed countries that depend on large inflows of foreign investment to finance their growth have a smaller GNI than GDP. This article analyzes how relevant these suggestions are for the Canadian economy. Since 1998, our ratio of GNI to GNP has risen 96% to 98%. In dollar terms, Canadians would have received $16.4 billion less income if GNI had grown only as fast as GDP, equivalent to $512 for every Canadian. Based on recent trends, Canada's GNI could outstrip its GDP for the first time on record before the end of the current decade.

    Release date: 2004-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004023
    Description:

    This article estimates and analyses the economic impact of the culture sector on Canada's employment and gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2004-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004026
    Description:

    This paper develops a production framework that allows for self-supplied water intake, an unpriced 'natural' input. The framework is then exploited to estimate the corresponding water shadow prices and to assess the extent to which water impacts on the multifactor productivity performance of the Canadian business sector's industries.

    Release date: 2004-12-01

  • Technical products: 11F0024M2004000
    Description:

    The accelerating pace of technological, environmental and social change presents new challenges for the economy and society. Meeting these challenges requires their clear identification, accurate measurement and full understanding. Insightful research plays a key role in this process.

    On June 7 and 8, 2004, Statistics Canada will hold its fifteenth annual Economic conference. The Economic conference will bring together researchers from business, government, research and labour communities to shed light on current economic and social issues. This event will provide a stimulating and challenging environment for presenters and participants alike, promoting the exchange of ideas while subjecting empirical, theoretical and data issues to critical assessment.

    The Economic conference 2004 is your opportunity to sample new research, examine the latest ideas, engage in discussion and acquire new insights. The conference program brings together experts in the field of socio-economic research from across Canada and other countries to look at emerging issues in today's economy and society.

    The Economic conference 2004 will include several plenary sessions featuring invited guest speakers who are leading authorities in their fields. It will also include presentations in which participants will discuss research, providing new perspectives on topics related to one of the sub-themes listed below: - Economic growth - The changing face of Canada - The environment and economic activity - Infrastructure

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007449
    Description:

    The state and local government sector owns nearly 90% of the nonmilitary capital structures and 70% of the nonmilitary equipment in the U.S. As such state and local governments are the key policymakers in determining levels of infrastructure investment. Yet as stewards of infrastructure, the states have had a rocky history. Current engineering studies examining the condition of U.S. capital stock suggest that much of it is disrepair and that investments of nearly $1.6 trillion would be needed over the next 5 years to restore full functionality to major types of infrastructure.

    Recently states have shown renewed interest in using capital investment in infrastructure as an economic development tool. Popular economic development theories based on enhancing industry agglomeration often find the condition of key infrastructure as a factor in economic growth. While many states accept this conclusion, they are faced with a policy conundrum. Facing tight fiscal circumstances, states and localities are trying to determine which infrastructure investments matter in triggering economic growth. This paper will survey what is known about measuring the effect of infrastructure investment and discuss whether states are asking the right questions before spending infrastructure dollars.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007455
    Description:

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the levels and trends in the industrial diversity of Canadian cities over the past 10 years (1992 to 2002), a period of significant structural change in the Canadian economy. Diverse cities are thought to be more stable and provide better environments that lead to stronger economic growth. Using detailed establishment-level data on businesses from the entire spectrum of small to large Canadian cities, the study shows that diversity levels vary significantly across cities, with the most populous cities being far more diverse than the least. Although there is a strong positive relationship between diversity and the population of a city, relatively small cities (those with a population around 100,000) can achieve levels of diversity that are near that of the largest urban centres. Consequently, most Canadians live in relatively diverse urban economic environments. Generally, the level of diversity of Canadian cities has increased over time. This has been particularly true of small cites with populations of less than 100,000. The largest cities have experienced declining diversity levels.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007448
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the contribution of public capital to productivity growth in the Canadian business sector. The approach developed here incorporates demand and supply forces, including the contribution of public capital, which may affect productivity performance. We estimate the model using disaggregated data composed of 37-industries in the Canadian business sector from 1961 to 2000. The results indicate that the main contributors to productivity growth, both at the industry and aggregate levels, are technical change and exogenous demand (representing the effect of aggregate income and population growth). Public capital contributed for about 18% of the overall business sector multifactor productivity growth over the 1961 to 2000 period. This is somewhat lower than the figures reported in the literature. However, the magnitudes of the contribution of public capital to productivity growth vary significantly across industries, with the largest impact occurring in transportation, trade and utilities.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007450
    Description:

    The manufacturing sector is a vital part of the Canadian economy. In 2002, it accounted for $165 billion of Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) and more than two million jobs. Unlike the other G7 countries, the contribution of the manufacturing sector to the Canadian economy has been increasing.

    From 1997 to 2002, average labour productivity growth in the manufacturing was slightly lower than the average for all industries. Part of this could be explained by the relatively low capital investment in the sector.

    In 2001, the R&D expenditure by the manufacturing sector represented 70 percent of all industrial R&D expenditures. The R&D intensity for the sector is about four times greater than that of all industries in Canada.

    The manufacturing sector has driven much of Canada's trade. In 2002, manufacturing exports accounted for 64 percent of Canada's total exports of goods and services. The sector became much more export dependent but Canada's overall manufacturing trade balance was negative. Nevertheless, Canada's manufacturing sector has been a success story.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004025
    Description:

    Productivity growth in the U.S. economy jumped during the second half of the 1990s, a resurgence that the literature linked to information technology use. This report contributes to this debate in two ways. First, using the most comparable Canadian and U.S. data available, the contributions of information technology to output, capital input, and productivity performance are quantified. Second, the report examines the extent to which information technology-producing and information technology-using industries have contributed to the aggregate multifactor productivity revival.

    Release date: 2004-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004024
    Description:

    This paper compares gross domestic product (GDP) per capita across Canadian provinces for the period 1990 to 2003. It starts by examining relative GDP per capita measured in current dollars across provinces and over time. In the second section, growth in nominal dollar GDP is broken down into a price and a volume component to determine whether growth over the period came from a higher volume of real output or higher prices received for the products being produced. In the third section, the relationship between increases in the volume component (real GDP per capita) and changes in productivity or in labour market conditions (hours worked per employee and the proportion of the working age population employed) is explored.

    Release date: 2004-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2004046
    Description:

    This overview examines recent economic developments and trends in the major aggregates that comprise GDP, both income and expenditure-based, and includes tables of key variables for each of the provinces and territories.

    Release date: 2004-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2004045
    Description:

    How "good" are the National Tourism Indicators (NTI)? How can their quality be measured? This study looks to answer these questions by analysing the revisions to the NTI estimates for the period 1997 through 2001.

    Release date: 2004-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2004008
    Description:

    This paper measures the extent of economic renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, 1961 to 1999, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040107420
    Description:

    This paper presents measures of the extent of renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker. Renewal occurs when old plants are supplanted by new plants or when some plants decline and others grow. In both cases, resources used in production are being shifted from less productive to more productive plants.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2004044
    Description:

    Starting with the first quarter 2004 release, revisions to the National Tourism Indicators (NTI) will be published once a year along with the first quarter data. Henceforth, NTI source data that are revised or come available several years after the fact will be incorporated regularly, allowing for systematic improvements to the time series.

    Release date: 2004-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004022
    Description:

    This paper examines the determinants of innovation and the role of innovation in productivity growth, shifts in market share and survival in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It presents a model that examines the effect of innovation on plant performance and plant survival.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040087009
    Description:

    This paper explores the dynamics of Social Assistance use over the 1990s to calculate annual incidence as well as entry and exit rates at both the national and provincial level, broken down by family type.

    Release date: 2004-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20040048511
    Description:

    The National Accounts Advisory Committee reviews and gives advice on the concepts, methods, plans, standards as well as results associated with Statistics Canada's System of National Accounts.

    Release date: 2004-08-13

  • Technical products: 11F0026M2004002
    Description:

    This paper discusses the productivity program at Statistics Canada, covering topics such as international efforts to provide more comparable statistics, attempts to expand our knowledge of the factors behind productivity growth, and challenges facing the program.

    Release date: 2004-08-06

  • Table: 15-515-X
    Description:

    This publication of the Canadian food processing industry provides an overview of industry trends and comparisons with the other G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2004-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004021
    Description:

    This paper proposes a method for measuring the impact of plant turnover on productivity growth and outlines how this contribution has changed in Canada as a result of substantial trade liberalization in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2004-07-22

  • Technical products: 11F0026M2004001
    Description:

    This paper describes how the analytical program of Statistics Canada's productivity group is used to enhance the quality (relevance, coherence, interpretability) of its products.

    Release date: 2004-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20040038503
    Description:

    With financial assets now estimated at market value, the role of wealth in the economy can now be examined. This note looks at the evolution of wealth and its components.

    Release date: 2004-06-24

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (25)

Analysis (25) (25 of 25 results)

Reference (9)

Reference (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Technical products: 15-002-M2001001
    Description:

    This document describes the sources, concepts and methods utilized by the Canadian Productivity Accounts and discusses how they compare with their U.S. counterparts.

    Release date: 2004-12-24

  • Technical products: 11F0024M2004000
    Description:

    The accelerating pace of technological, environmental and social change presents new challenges for the economy and society. Meeting these challenges requires their clear identification, accurate measurement and full understanding. Insightful research plays a key role in this process.

    On June 7 and 8, 2004, Statistics Canada will hold its fifteenth annual Economic conference. The Economic conference will bring together researchers from business, government, research and labour communities to shed light on current economic and social issues. This event will provide a stimulating and challenging environment for presenters and participants alike, promoting the exchange of ideas while subjecting empirical, theoretical and data issues to critical assessment.

    The Economic conference 2004 is your opportunity to sample new research, examine the latest ideas, engage in discussion and acquire new insights. The conference program brings together experts in the field of socio-economic research from across Canada and other countries to look at emerging issues in today's economy and society.

    The Economic conference 2004 will include several plenary sessions featuring invited guest speakers who are leading authorities in their fields. It will also include presentations in which participants will discuss research, providing new perspectives on topics related to one of the sub-themes listed below: - Economic growth - The changing face of Canada - The environment and economic activity - Infrastructure

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007449
    Description:

    The state and local government sector owns nearly 90% of the nonmilitary capital structures and 70% of the nonmilitary equipment in the U.S. As such state and local governments are the key policymakers in determining levels of infrastructure investment. Yet as stewards of infrastructure, the states have had a rocky history. Current engineering studies examining the condition of U.S. capital stock suggest that much of it is disrepair and that investments of nearly $1.6 trillion would be needed over the next 5 years to restore full functionality to major types of infrastructure.

    Recently states have shown renewed interest in using capital investment in infrastructure as an economic development tool. Popular economic development theories based on enhancing industry agglomeration often find the condition of key infrastructure as a factor in economic growth. While many states accept this conclusion, they are faced with a policy conundrum. Facing tight fiscal circumstances, states and localities are trying to determine which infrastructure investments matter in triggering economic growth. This paper will survey what is known about measuring the effect of infrastructure investment and discuss whether states are asking the right questions before spending infrastructure dollars.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007455
    Description:

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the levels and trends in the industrial diversity of Canadian cities over the past 10 years (1992 to 2002), a period of significant structural change in the Canadian economy. Diverse cities are thought to be more stable and provide better environments that lead to stronger economic growth. Using detailed establishment-level data on businesses from the entire spectrum of small to large Canadian cities, the study shows that diversity levels vary significantly across cities, with the most populous cities being far more diverse than the least. Although there is a strong positive relationship between diversity and the population of a city, relatively small cities (those with a population around 100,000) can achieve levels of diversity that are near that of the largest urban centres. Consequently, most Canadians live in relatively diverse urban economic environments. Generally, the level of diversity of Canadian cities has increased over time. This has been particularly true of small cites with populations of less than 100,000. The largest cities have experienced declining diversity levels.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007448
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the contribution of public capital to productivity growth in the Canadian business sector. The approach developed here incorporates demand and supply forces, including the contribution of public capital, which may affect productivity performance. We estimate the model using disaggregated data composed of 37-industries in the Canadian business sector from 1961 to 2000. The results indicate that the main contributors to productivity growth, both at the industry and aggregate levels, are technical change and exogenous demand (representing the effect of aggregate income and population growth). Public capital contributed for about 18% of the overall business sector multifactor productivity growth over the 1961 to 2000 period. This is somewhat lower than the figures reported in the literature. However, the magnitudes of the contribution of public capital to productivity growth vary significantly across industries, with the largest impact occurring in transportation, trade and utilities.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007450
    Description:

    The manufacturing sector is a vital part of the Canadian economy. In 2002, it accounted for $165 billion of Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) and more than two million jobs. Unlike the other G7 countries, the contribution of the manufacturing sector to the Canadian economy has been increasing.

    From 1997 to 2002, average labour productivity growth in the manufacturing was slightly lower than the average for all industries. Part of this could be explained by the relatively low capital investment in the sector.

    In 2001, the R&D expenditure by the manufacturing sector represented 70 percent of all industrial R&D expenditures. The R&D intensity for the sector is about four times greater than that of all industries in Canada.

    The manufacturing sector has driven much of Canada's trade. In 2002, manufacturing exports accounted for 64 percent of Canada's total exports of goods and services. The sector became much more export dependent but Canada's overall manufacturing trade balance was negative. Nevertheless, Canada's manufacturing sector has been a success story.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0026M2004002
    Description:

    This paper discusses the productivity program at Statistics Canada, covering topics such as international efforts to provide more comparable statistics, attempts to expand our knowledge of the factors behind productivity growth, and challenges facing the program.

    Release date: 2004-08-06

  • Technical products: 11F0026M2004001
    Description:

    This paper describes how the analytical program of Statistics Canada's productivity group is used to enhance the quality (relevance, coherence, interpretability) of its products.

    Release date: 2004-07-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 67-001-X20030036827
    Description:

    The reconciled estimates are intended to show how the current account estimates would appear if both countries used the same definitions, methodologies, and data sources.

    Release date: 2004-03-02

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: