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All (99)

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Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009058
    Description:

    This paper examines the different types of deflators that are used to compare volume estimates of national income and production across countries. It argues that these deflators need to be tailored to the specific income concept used for study. If the potential to spend concept is employed, a purchasing power deflator is needed. If a production based concept is used, a producing power deflator is necessary. The paper argues that present practice produces a hybrid deflator that fails both purposes when terms of trade shifts are large and offers a solution.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X200900211057
    Description:

    With the latest release of the bilateral Purchasing Power Parities estimates for Canada and the U.S., an improved projection methodology for the non-benchmark year has been employed. This note summarizes the new methodology and its rationale.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901211053
    Description:

    This paper re-examines Canadian real GDI relative to the US converted with purchasing power parities based on what production can purchase rather than conventional measures based on production, which narrows the shortfall of Canada's relative income per capita from 15% in 2002 to 8% in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2009062
    Description:

    Statistics Canada produces monthly import and export merchandise trade price indexes. For the majority of these prices, Statistics Canada uses a variety of proxy measures to derive the price index in lieu of collecting observed import and export prices. The ability of these proxy measures to reflect international trade price movements during times of exchange rate volatility is limited. For this reason, the constant dollar trade estimates derived using these proxy price indexes have been refined with constant dollar adjustments following the appreciation of the Canadian exchange rate beginning at the end of 2002. This paper explains the rational and methodology behind these adjustments, as well as the impact on published trade and GDP estimates.

    Release date: 2009-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X200900111027
    Description:

    With the release of the Financial Flow Accounts (FFA) on December 1st and the National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA) on December 14th, the Income and Expenditure Accounts Division will be publishing revised sector and category detail on CANSIM.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009082
    Description:

    Using data from Quarterly Financial Statistics (QFS) for Enterprises and National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA), this article examines the indebtedness and liquidity position of Canadian non-financial corporations from 1961 to 2009. Recent trends in these two financial indicators are also presented by industry.

    Release date: 2009-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901010945
    Description:

    A detailed look at the sudden drop in Canada's exports and imports starting last autumn finds that 80% of their declines was concentrated in energy, autos and industrial goods. Consumer and agricultural goods were largely unaffected by the recession.

    Release date: 2009-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2009024
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of the unincorporated sector using the number of self-employed and gross domestic product (GDP), in that sector over the period 1987 to 2005.

    Self-employment studies have analyzed various characteristics of self-employed workers, including age, sex, immigration status and education, but have generally lacked measures of GDP associated with unincorporated self-employment. This study redresses the lack of economic data, and estimates GDP by industry arising from unincorporated self-employment. This paper updates the 1997 - 2002 estimates of unincorporated GDP derived by Rispoli (2009).

    The paper also examines how unincorporated self-employment responded to both overall economic trends and business cycles. The rate of unincorporated self-employment was positively correlated to the unemployment rate in the long run.

    The paper also looks at incorporated self-employment. (Close to one million self-employed were incorporated in 2005). It investigates its relationship to the same macroeconomic conditions to determine if incorporated self-employment has a profile similar to unincorporated self-employment. Previous self-employment studies have typically treated self-employment as a homogeneous group. This paper examines the differences between the two groups and finds that they react differently to macroeconomic conditions.

    Incorporated self-employment grew substantially between 1987 and 1999 (averaging 3.8% per year), and continued to grow between 2000 and 2005 (averaging 4.1% per year). The evidence suggests that a shift in self-employment did not occur from unincorporated enterprises to corporations, but that different forces were at work in the two sectors. Over the long run, the unincorporated self-employment rate is positively correlated to the unemployment rate. In contrast, the incorporated self-employment rate is not related to changes in the unemployment rate, but is positively correlated to overall GDP growth.

    Release date: 2009-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900910924
    Description:

    The growth of unincorporated GDP fell below corporate GDP in recent years, after similar increases in the two sectors through most of the 1990s. The slowdown was more pronounced for self-employment, after much faster growth in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2009-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900810917
    Description:

    Manufacturing's share of nominal GDP has fallen over the last half century due to lower relative prices in Canada, not a declining volume of production. These price declines reflect productivity growth, while also lowered the share of manufacturing in employment. Canada's manufacturing structure shifted to mirror the United States after free trade was introduced in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2009-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900610893
    Description:

    Using national accounts data on the financial flows, balance sheets and Canada's international investments, this paper shows how the crisis in financial markets has affected financial behaviour in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2009061
    Description:

    This paper reports on the update to 2007 of the Human Resource Module (HRM) of the Tourism Satellite Account developed by Statistics Canada. The HRM provides detailed information on employment related to tourism. Information on wages and salaries, number of jobs and hours worked by occupation are included. The data are also disaggregated by age, gender and immigration status. This study provides a resource for training and planning for tourism.

    Release date: 2009-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900510867
    Description:

    An examination of whether turning points in employment lag output, and whether employers hoard labour during cyclical downturns.

    Release date: 2009-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900410848
    Description:

    A review of the Canadian economy in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900310833
    Description:

    Recessions in the United States have been accompanied by a wide range of outcomes in Canada. A review of some of the linkages between the two countries, as well as what defines a recession and other determinants of its severity.

    Release date: 2009-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2009023
    Description:

    This paper sheds light on the contribution of unincorporated enterprises to the Canadian economy in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) from 1997 to 2002. The study separates the aggregate business GDP, including its components, into the unincorporated and incorporated sectors. After describing the key legal and organizational differences between the unincorporated and incorporated sectors, including tax regime, limited liability, and number of entities, employment and capital intensity, it looks at the contribution of the two sectors across various industries. It provides estimates for 25 S-level industries and W-level detail for some of the more important industries of the unincorporated sector. In deriving the estimates, the study used the same data sources as those used in Statistics Canada's Input-Output Accounts. Results of the study suggest that the unincorporated sector contributed $82.2 billion in 2002 representing 10.1% of total business sector GDP, a slight decrease from 11.3% in 1997.

    Release date: 2009-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900110780
    Description:

    Despite more stable annual growth since 2002, there has been no reduction in the volatility of monthly changes in GDP. Partly this reflects the increasing importance of industries such as resources and construction where output is more unstable.

    Release date: 2009-01-15

Reference (5)

Reference (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2009025
    Description:

    Baldwin and Gu (2008) provide an overview of the productivity program at Statistics Canada and a brief description of Canada's productivity performance. This paper provides an update of Canada's productivity performance in more recent years and analyses the sources of weak productivity performance in Canada since 2000.

    Release date: 2009-08-04

  • Index and guides: 68F0023X
    Description:

    Government financial reports are based on the organisation of each individual government and on their accounting and reporting practices. There is therefore little uniformity from one level of government to another or from one province to another. The Financial Management System (FMS) is an analytical framework designed to produce statistical series that are both consistent and compatible.

    Written in plain English, the Financial Management System (FMS) manual was designed to assist you in better understanding the framework of the Financial Management System (FMS). It will explain the strengths and caveats of the FMS and will provide you with clear explanations of what is included in each revenue source and each expenditure function.

    Release date: 2009-07-27

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2009024
    Description:

    This paper uses plant-level data on productivity growth and changes in market share over different periods during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to investigate whether plants with declining market shares obtain productivity spillovers from more successful producers and whether the impact of spillovers is affected by the distance between plants. We are primarily interested in the extent to which productivity externalities moderate the centrifugal forces that separate growing plants from declining rivals because of the productivity advantages enjoyed by the former.

    The paper focuses on the productivity performance of plants with declining market shares as potential receivers of productivity spillovers. Two possible sources for these spillovers are examined rival plants operating at the technological frontier and rivals that are actively gaining market share. The analysis advances a model of the externality process in which the productivity of declining plants is influenced by (1) the economic distance of the declining plant from its technological frontier at the beginning of any period, (2) contemporaneous productivity gains in rival plants that are actively wresting market share away from decliners, and (3) the distance between rival plants.

    We evaluate the existence and magnitude of these sources of spillovers frontier plants and market-share gainers because of what they reveal about the types of productive information that struggling plants may be able to assimilate from rivals. Spillovers from the plants at the existing frontier are likely to reflect the established best practices of industry leaders; spillovers coming from market-share gainers involve new sources of productive knowledge that emerge as the frontier is actively being re-established. Our model also incorporates geographic information on the proximity of declining plants to both frontier plants and market-share gainers to test whether productivity spillovers are spatially circumscribed. The results provide evidence that productivity improvements in more successful plants benefit their struggling rivals and that these benefits are inversely related to distance; however, the magnitude of spillovers from growing plants to decliners is relatively small. Spillovers do not offer much of a safety net for producers that are losing the productivity race. The paper also shows that declining plants that start out behind the technological frontier are likely to fall further behind, after the impact of mean reversion is taken into account.

    Release date: 2009-05-19

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2009023
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of the revisions to labour productivity estimates and related variables covering the revision cycle of the National Accounts from 2004 to 2007 for Canada and from 2005 to 2007 for the United States.

    Release date: 2009-03-11

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2008021
    Description:

    This paper makes use of a growth accounting framework to examine the importance of public capital for private sector productivity growth. Most measures of multifactor productivity consider only the inputs of the business sector. This paper produces an alternate measure of multifactor productivity for the business sector that incorporates the impact of public capital. It uses the estimate of the elasticity of business sector output with respect to public capital derived from Macdonald (2008). Over the period, the conventional estimate of MFP growth averages 0.4% per year. About half of this growth is attributable to public capital.

    Release date: 2009-01-14

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