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All (46) (25 of 46 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001211393
    Description:

    Output and employment growth regularly slows, as occurred over the summer of 2010. This paper looks at slowdowns over the last three decades, and finds they occur in response to a wide range of cyclical and irregular factors. However, they rarely if ever turn into recessions.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Index and guides: 13-599-X
    Description:

    This guide presents an overview of the scope and structure of the Pension Satellite Account as well as the methodology used to derive its stocks and flows estimates.

    Release date: 2010-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001111370
    Description:

    A look at how these different measures relate to each other, when they should be used and why statistical agencies have developed more sophisticated measures of volume data.

    Release date: 2010-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2010067
    Description:

    This publication presents estimates of government revenues attributable to tourism for the years 2003 to 2009. Estimates of the revenue attributable to tourism spending by non-residents (i.e. tourism exports) and by residents (i.e. tourism domestic demand) are also included. The main data sources are the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account, National Tourism Indicators, the Income and Expenditure Accounts, the Input-Output tables and T-4 tax remittance files.

    Government revenue covers receipts from taxes on incomes (i.e., on employment earnings, corporate profits, net income of unincorporated business and government business enterprises), contributions to social insurance plans (i.e., premiums for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and workers compensation), taxes on production and products (such as sales and property taxes), and from sales of government goods and services. These revenues are broken down into parts that can be attributed to tourism spending, tourism domestic demand and tourism exports for government as a whole and for the three levels of government (federal, provincial/territorial and municipal) separately. Estimates of the government revenue generated per $100 of tourism spending overall and by residents and non-residents are reported as well. The publication contains several charts and summary tables showing revenues attributable to tourism by level of government and by source of revenue. It also contains a discussion of the concepts, definitions, data sources and methods used in the study.

    Release date: 2010-11-10

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2010028
    Description:

    This study uses new GDP estimates for the unincorporated sector in order to examine labour productivity in the unincorporated sector and to compare it to that in the corporate sector over the period 1987 to 2005. The level of nominal GDP per hour worked is significantly lower for unincorporated enterprises ($23.20 in 2005) than it is for corporations ($43.40 in 2005). In 2005, GDP per hour worked in the unincorporated sector was just 53% of GDP per hour worked in the corporate sector.

    Release date: 2010-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000911343
    Description:

    A review of how the unfolding of the global financial crisis was reflected in securities transactions and investment flows into and out of Canada.

    Release date: 2010-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000711321
    Description:

    Inventory changes dominated the business cycle in the 1960s and 1970s. However, inventories have played little role in the last three recessions, thanks to tighter control of stocks.

    Release date: 2010-07-15

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2010027
    Description:

    Measures of productivity are derived by comparing outputs and inputs. The System of National Accounts (SNA) in Canada provides a useful framework for organizing the information required for comparisons of this type. Integrated systems of economic accounts provide coherent, consistent alternate estimates of the various concepts that can be used to measure productivity.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010063
    Description:

    This paper examines how trade liberalization and fluctuations in real exchange rates affect export-market entry/exit and plant-level productivity. It uses the experience of Canadian manufacturing plants over three separate periods that featuring different rates of bilateral tariff reduction and differing movements in bilateral real exchange rates. The patterns of entry and exit responses as well as the productivity outcomes differ markedly in the three periods. Consistent with much of the recent literature, the paper finds that plants self-select into export markets-that is, more efficient plants are more likely to enter and less likely to exit export markets. The reverse also occurs: entrants to export markets improve their productivity performance relative to the population from which they originated and plants that stay in export markets do better than comparable plants that exited, lending support to the thesis that exporting boosts productivity. Finally, we find that overall market access conditions, including real exchange rate trends, significantly affect the extent of productivity gains to be derived from participating in export markets. In particular, the increase in the value of the Canadian dollar during the post-2002 period almost completely offset the productivity growth advantages that new export-market participants would otherwise have enjoyed.

    Release date: 2010-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010062
    Description:

    This paper produces an estimate of market-based human capital investment and stock for Canada over the period from 1970 to 2007 based on the lifetime income approach and compares it with that of physical and natural capital investment and stock. It adopts the methodology developed by Jorgenson and Fraumeni, and estimates human capital stock as the expected future lifetime income of all individuals. Human capital investment is estimated as changes in human capital stock due to the addition of new members of the working age population arising from the rearing and education of children and the effect of immigration on human capital.

    The main findings are as follows:

    1. The volume of aggregate human capital rose at an annual rate of 1.7% in Canada for the period 1970 to 2007, and most of the growth is due to the increase in the number of individuals in the working-age population. The rising education level of the Canadian population is also a significant contributing factor to the growth in human capital.

    2. The compositional effects of aging of the Canadian population (a movement to a population that is older on average) reduced human capital growth by 0.6% per year over the period 1980 to 2007, while the rising education level increased human capital growth by 0.7% per year over the period.

    3. Human capital stock on a per capita basis increased at 0.9% per year for the period 1970 to 1980, due to the rising education attainment during the period. After 1980, human capital stock per capita was virtually unchanged due to two offsetting factors: rising education level which increased human capital stock and the compositional effects of population aging, which reduced human capital stock.

    4. The value of human capital investment and stock exceeds the value of physical capital investment and stock, and the ratio of human capital investment and stock to physical capital investment and stock declined over time. In 2007, human capital stock is about four times as large as physical capital stock while investment in human capital is about two times the magnitude of investment in physical capital.

    5. The levels of human capital investment and stock estimates are sensitive to the assumptions made about expected future income growth and the rate used to discount the future income when calculating human capital, but the growth of the quantity and price of human capital investment and stock is not sensitive to the assumptions in these areas.

    Release date: 2010-06-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-624-M
    Description:

    This series contains short analytical articles providing statistical insights on emerging issues in the economy such as productivity, innovation and technology use. These articles briefly describe the issues and the results examined by these research papers.

    The articles describe issues on a wide range of topics, including - the amount of dynamic competition taking place as a result of the entry of new firms and the exit of closed firms; - the amount of merger activity taking place; - the difference between multinational and domestic firms; - the productivity growth in Canada; - the changes in the geographic location of industry; - the problems in small-firm financing; - the changing industrial structure of different regions; - how the economy interacts with the environment; - the changes in trade patterns; - Canada/United States price differences; - the innovation process in Canada; - the differences between small and large producers; - the changing patterns of advanced technology use and its effect on firm performance; - the type of strategies that differentiate more-successful from less-successful firms.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201000211163
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts covering the period 2006 to 2009 have been released along with those for the first quarter of 2010. The current revisions to GDP resulted from the inclusion of the most current estimates from data sources, including survey results, administrative data and public accounts.

    Release date: 2010-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2010066
    Description:

    This paper reports on the Human Resource Module of the Tourism Satellite Account, 2009 developed by Statistics Canada. This study provides detailed information on employment related to tourism in Canada. Information on wages and salaries, number of jobs and hours worked by occupation are included. The data are also disaggregated by age, gender and immigration status. This study provides a resource for training and planning for tourism in Canada.

    This study was prepared by Monique Bisaillon of the Research and Development Projects and Analysis Section, Income and Expenditure Accounts Division, Statistics Canada. The study was funded through a partnership agreement with the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council.

    Release date: 2010-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000511164
    Description:

    Financial and commodity markets saw declines late in 2008 that set records for both speed and severity. This paper explores some of the reasons for these rapid declines and their implications for output and employment.

    Release date: 2010-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201000111155
    Description:

    The government finance statistical program is designed to measure and analyze the economic dimensions of the public sector of Canada

    Statistics Canada, in cooperation with representatives of all levels of government and with the academic and business communities, developed the Financial Management System (FMS) over the last 65 years. The FMS was founded on a modified-cash based system of accounting. Recently, Canadian governments have decided to move from that modified-cash based accounting system to an accrual based accounting system. In addition, an internationally accepted Government Finance Statistics (GFS) manual has been developed. This article outlines the move to Government Finance Statistics.

    Release date: 2010-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201000111130
    Description:

    The majority of Canada's national, provincial and territorial macroeconomic indicators originate from the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA). These indicators include such things as gross domestic product, net worth, savings, personal disposable income and government debt. Statistics Canada is launching a project that will make key changes to these macroeconomic indicators. The changes introduced by this project are outlined in this paper.

    Release date: 2010-05-05

Data (25)

Data (25) (25 of 25 results)

Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001211393
    Description:

    Output and employment growth regularly slows, as occurred over the summer of 2010. This paper looks at slowdowns over the last three decades, and finds they occur in response to a wide range of cyclical and irregular factors. However, they rarely if ever turn into recessions.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001111370
    Description:

    A look at how these different measures relate to each other, when they should be used and why statistical agencies have developed more sophisticated measures of volume data.

    Release date: 2010-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2010067
    Description:

    This publication presents estimates of government revenues attributable to tourism for the years 2003 to 2009. Estimates of the revenue attributable to tourism spending by non-residents (i.e. tourism exports) and by residents (i.e. tourism domestic demand) are also included. The main data sources are the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account, National Tourism Indicators, the Income and Expenditure Accounts, the Input-Output tables and T-4 tax remittance files.

    Government revenue covers receipts from taxes on incomes (i.e., on employment earnings, corporate profits, net income of unincorporated business and government business enterprises), contributions to social insurance plans (i.e., premiums for Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and workers compensation), taxes on production and products (such as sales and property taxes), and from sales of government goods and services. These revenues are broken down into parts that can be attributed to tourism spending, tourism domestic demand and tourism exports for government as a whole and for the three levels of government (federal, provincial/territorial and municipal) separately. Estimates of the government revenue generated per $100 of tourism spending overall and by residents and non-residents are reported as well. The publication contains several charts and summary tables showing revenues attributable to tourism by level of government and by source of revenue. It also contains a discussion of the concepts, definitions, data sources and methods used in the study.

    Release date: 2010-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000911343
    Description:

    A review of how the unfolding of the global financial crisis was reflected in securities transactions and investment flows into and out of Canada.

    Release date: 2010-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000711321
    Description:

    Inventory changes dominated the business cycle in the 1960s and 1970s. However, inventories have played little role in the last three recessions, thanks to tighter control of stocks.

    Release date: 2010-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010063
    Description:

    This paper examines how trade liberalization and fluctuations in real exchange rates affect export-market entry/exit and plant-level productivity. It uses the experience of Canadian manufacturing plants over three separate periods that featuring different rates of bilateral tariff reduction and differing movements in bilateral real exchange rates. The patterns of entry and exit responses as well as the productivity outcomes differ markedly in the three periods. Consistent with much of the recent literature, the paper finds that plants self-select into export markets-that is, more efficient plants are more likely to enter and less likely to exit export markets. The reverse also occurs: entrants to export markets improve their productivity performance relative to the population from which they originated and plants that stay in export markets do better than comparable plants that exited, lending support to the thesis that exporting boosts productivity. Finally, we find that overall market access conditions, including real exchange rate trends, significantly affect the extent of productivity gains to be derived from participating in export markets. In particular, the increase in the value of the Canadian dollar during the post-2002 period almost completely offset the productivity growth advantages that new export-market participants would otherwise have enjoyed.

    Release date: 2010-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010062
    Description:

    This paper produces an estimate of market-based human capital investment and stock for Canada over the period from 1970 to 2007 based on the lifetime income approach and compares it with that of physical and natural capital investment and stock. It adopts the methodology developed by Jorgenson and Fraumeni, and estimates human capital stock as the expected future lifetime income of all individuals. Human capital investment is estimated as changes in human capital stock due to the addition of new members of the working age population arising from the rearing and education of children and the effect of immigration on human capital.

    The main findings are as follows:

    1. The volume of aggregate human capital rose at an annual rate of 1.7% in Canada for the period 1970 to 2007, and most of the growth is due to the increase in the number of individuals in the working-age population. The rising education level of the Canadian population is also a significant contributing factor to the growth in human capital.

    2. The compositional effects of aging of the Canadian population (a movement to a population that is older on average) reduced human capital growth by 0.6% per year over the period 1980 to 2007, while the rising education level increased human capital growth by 0.7% per year over the period.

    3. Human capital stock on a per capita basis increased at 0.9% per year for the period 1970 to 1980, due to the rising education attainment during the period. After 1980, human capital stock per capita was virtually unchanged due to two offsetting factors: rising education level which increased human capital stock and the compositional effects of population aging, which reduced human capital stock.

    4. The value of human capital investment and stock exceeds the value of physical capital investment and stock, and the ratio of human capital investment and stock to physical capital investment and stock declined over time. In 2007, human capital stock is about four times as large as physical capital stock while investment in human capital is about two times the magnitude of investment in physical capital.

    5. The levels of human capital investment and stock estimates are sensitive to the assumptions made about expected future income growth and the rate used to discount the future income when calculating human capital, but the growth of the quantity and price of human capital investment and stock is not sensitive to the assumptions in these areas.

    Release date: 2010-06-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-624-M
    Description:

    This series contains short analytical articles providing statistical insights on emerging issues in the economy such as productivity, innovation and technology use. These articles briefly describe the issues and the results examined by these research papers.

    The articles describe issues on a wide range of topics, including - the amount of dynamic competition taking place as a result of the entry of new firms and the exit of closed firms; - the amount of merger activity taking place; - the difference between multinational and domestic firms; - the productivity growth in Canada; - the changes in the geographic location of industry; - the problems in small-firm financing; - the changing industrial structure of different regions; - how the economy interacts with the environment; - the changes in trade patterns; - Canada/United States price differences; - the innovation process in Canada; - the differences between small and large producers; - the changing patterns of advanced technology use and its effect on firm performance; - the type of strategies that differentiate more-successful from less-successful firms.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201000211163
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts covering the period 2006 to 2009 have been released along with those for the first quarter of 2010. The current revisions to GDP resulted from the inclusion of the most current estimates from data sources, including survey results, administrative data and public accounts.

    Release date: 2010-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2010066
    Description:

    This paper reports on the Human Resource Module of the Tourism Satellite Account, 2009 developed by Statistics Canada. This study provides detailed information on employment related to tourism in Canada. Information on wages and salaries, number of jobs and hours worked by occupation are included. The data are also disaggregated by age, gender and immigration status. This study provides a resource for training and planning for tourism in Canada.

    This study was prepared by Monique Bisaillon of the Research and Development Projects and Analysis Section, Income and Expenditure Accounts Division, Statistics Canada. The study was funded through a partnership agreement with the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council.

    Release date: 2010-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000511164
    Description:

    Financial and commodity markets saw declines late in 2008 that set records for both speed and severity. This paper explores some of the reasons for these rapid declines and their implications for output and employment.

    Release date: 2010-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201000111155
    Description:

    The government finance statistical program is designed to measure and analyze the economic dimensions of the public sector of Canada

    Statistics Canada, in cooperation with representatives of all levels of government and with the academic and business communities, developed the Financial Management System (FMS) over the last 65 years. The FMS was founded on a modified-cash based system of accounting. Recently, Canadian governments have decided to move from that modified-cash based accounting system to an accrual based accounting system. In addition, an internationally accepted Government Finance Statistics (GFS) manual has been developed. This article outlines the move to Government Finance Statistics.

    Release date: 2010-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201000111130
    Description:

    The majority of Canada's national, provincial and territorial macroeconomic indicators originate from the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA). These indicators include such things as gross domestic product, net worth, savings, personal disposable income and government debt. Statistics Canada is launching a project that will make key changes to these macroeconomic indicators. The changes introduced by this project are outlined in this paper.

    Release date: 2010-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000411150
    Description:

    The global recession of 2008-2009 was less severe and shorter in Canada. While exports and corporate profits fell sharply due to the global recession, domestic spending was sustained by strong balance sheets and savings built up in previous years and a financial system that emerged largely unscathed from the crisis in the US and Europe. The industrial pattern of the recession in Canada was quite similar to previous recessions.

    Release date: 2010-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2010065
    Description:

    This paper reports on the Human Resource Module (HRM) of the Tourism Satellite Account: A Pilot Study for Ontario developed by Statistics Canada. This pilot study provides detailed information on employment related to tourism in Ontario. Information on wages and salaries, number of jobs and hours worked by occupation are included. The data are also disaggregated by age, gender and immigration status. This study provides a resource for training and planning for tourism in Ontario.

    This study was prepared by Monique Bisaillon of the Research and Development Projects and Analysis Section, Income and Expenditure Accounts Division, Statistics Canada. The study was funded through a partnership agreement with the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council and the Ontario Ministry of Tourism.

    Release date: 2010-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010059
    Description:

    This paper uses Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) data to examine changes in labour productivity, real gross domestic product (GDP), real gross domestic income (GDI), economic aggregates and relative economic growth over time. Real GDI combines changes in production (real GDP), with a trading gain derived from relative price changes. The paper considers two sources of trading gains: the terms of trade and the real exchange rate. For OECD countries, the terms of trade is the more important price ratio, making a contribution to real income growth that is, on average, an order of magnitude larger than the real exchange rate.

    Over long time periods, the most important source of real income growth is changes in production. Over shorter time horizons, however, the trading gain can make noteworthy contributions. Changes in aggregates, like real private consumption or the relative economic performance of nations, are shown to be particularly dependent on the trading gain during the large swings in resource prices that occurred after 2002.

    Release date: 2010-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000111075
    Description:

    Since 1980, labour productivity has risen during recessions in Canada and the US, with the exception of Canada during 2008-2009. A detailed examination of each cyclical downturn since 1980 shows that employers have moved faster to cut labour inputs during recessions, especially in the US.

    Release date: 2010-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2010025
    Description:

    This paper examines the different types of deflators that are used to compare volume estimates of national income and production across countries. It argues that these deflators need to be tailored to the specific income concept used for study. If the potential to spend concept is employed, a purchasing power deflator is needed. If a production based concept is used, a producing power deflator is necessary. The paper argues that present practice produces a hybrid deflator that fails both purposes when terms of trade shifts are large and offers a solution.

    Release date: 2010-01-12

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