Statistics by subject – Economic accounts

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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 67-001-X
    Description:

    This publication presents Canada's transactions with non-residents on a quarterly basis. These transactions are grouped under two main accounts: the current account which includes goods, services, investment income and current transfers; and the capital and financial account which includes information on a country's investing and financing activities. The transactions are further broken down by major geographical region: United States, United Kingdom, other countries of the European Union, Japan, other countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, and all other countries. The data are presented quarterly and annually for the six most recent years.

    Each publication includes several pages of data analysis accompanied by graphics, definitions, CANSIM data bank numbers, data quality measures and a list of occasional articles and research papers. The first quarter issue includes revisions to quarterly and annual data for the most recent four years. Statistics are derived from surveys, administrative data and other sources.

    Release date: 2012-09-04

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2012029
    Description:

    Intangible capital consists of investments that do not take on the solid, physical characteristics of machinery and equipment or buildings. Nevertheless, such investments have some of the properties of other types of investments in that they yield long-lasting benefits as a result of expenditures that are made today. In the National Accounts, these expenditures need to be capitalized rather than expensed as intermediate materials for purposes of estimating gross domestic product (GDP).

    Recent papers have considered issues surrounding the measurement of intangibles. Baldwin et al. (2005) discussed issues surrounding research and development (R&D). They noted that R&D is only one of the components of innovation expenditures. Baldwin et al. (2009) extended the measurement of intangible investments beyond that of just R&D. At the heart of intangible investments, of course, are software and R&D. However, intangible investments also consist of purchased science services, own-account scientific services, exploration expenses in the resource sector, and advertising expenditures, because these create an intangible asset and yield long-term benefits.

    This paper extends the authors' previous work in three ways. First, it expands it into several new areas--what are referred to as economic competencies. These involve primarily investments in human capital--via management and training investments as well as management consulting services. This not only provides broader coverage; it also allows cross-country comparisons of Canada to the United States.

    Second, this paper moves from just measuring investment to also developing capital stock estimates. This requires assumptions about depreciation rates. In both instances, the paper adopts assumptions similar to those used elsewhere in developing estimates for the United States, in order to ensure comparability.

    Third, the paper incorporates the estimates of intangible capital into the growth-accounting framework so as to understand how it is related to productivity growth. A comparison of Canada and the United States in this regard is also provided.

    Release date: 2012-06-01

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