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All (60) (25 of 60 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014005
    Description:

    In 2010, the Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. The CIUS consists of a household component that measures home access, and an individual component that measures online behaviours, including the use of e-commerce.

    These infographics describe some results of the Canadian Internet Use and e-Commerce survey of 2010.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • Table: 15-210-X
    Description:

    This product presents estimates of gross output by industry, in current dollars, evaluated at modified basic price for all provinces and territories. These estimates are derived from the provincial Input-Output tables.

    Gross output consists of those goods and services that are produced within an establishment that become available for use outside that establishment, plus any goods and services produced for own final use.

    The modified basic price for a good or service is its selling price at the boundary of the producing establishment excluding sales and excise taxes levied after the final stage of production. This price includes subsidies, in the sense that it is not adjusted for subsidies received by the producer. Modified basic price is the most easily observable transaction price. It equals the purchaser price less transport, trade and tax margins involved in delivering the product to the purchaser.

    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • Table: 15-209-X
    Description:

    This product presents estimates of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by industry, in current dollars, evaluated at basic price for all provinces and territories. These estimates are derived from the provincial Input-Output tables.

    GDP measures the unduplicated value of production. The GDP by industry estimates are derived using a "value added" approach, that is, the value that a producer adds to their intermediate inputs before generating their own output. This allows not only for the computation of total economic production but also the industrial composition and origin of the economic production.

    When evaluated at basic prices, an industry's GDP is the sum of its factor incomes (wages and salaries, supplementary labour income, mixed income and other operating surplus) plus taxes less subsidies on production (labour and capital).

    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X201400014117
    Description:

    The 2014 article “Agriculture in Canada” gathers together a variety of statistics describing agriculture from the perspective of ecosystem goods and services.

    The article addresses the ecological infrastructure supporting agricultural activity (Section 2), ecosystem goods and services from agriculture (Section 3), the main beneficiaries of these goods and services (Section 4) and the environmental impacts and management activities associated with agriculture (Section 5). Section 6 provides an example to illustrate how agricultural information can be integrated into a system of environmental accounts that follow international guidelines being developed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Section 7 concludes with a short listing of areas requiring further research.

    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014042
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents estimates of census metropolitan area gross domestic product (GDP) from 2001 to 2009. It examines the level of metropolitan area GDP, the contribution of metropolitan areas to national GDP, and how GDP per capita varies across metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2014-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201400514088
    Description:

    An overview of the Canadian Government Finance Statistics (CGFS) framework; how it relates to other government statistics such as the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts and the Public Accounts; and the new GFS data products available to users

    Release date: 2014-11-07

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-11-05

  • Table: 15F0042X
    Description:

    The Input-Output accounting system consists of three tables. The input tables (USE tables) detail the commodities that are consumed by various industries. Output tables (MAKE tables) detail the commodities that are produced by various industries. Final demand tables detail the commodities bought by many categories of buyers (consumers, industries, non-profit institutions and government) for both consumption and investment purposes. These tables allow users to track intersectoral exchanges of goods and services between industries and final demand categories such as personal expenditures, capital expenditures and public sector expenditures.

    The provincial input-output tables are constructed every year starting with the 1997 tables. The tables are only available at the “Summary” level with 35 industries, 74 commodities and 25 final demand categories.

    Release date: 2014-11-05

  • Table: 15F0041X
    Description:

    The Input-Output accounting system consists of three tables. The input tables (USE tables) detail the commodities that are consumed by various industries. Output tables (MAKE tables) detail the commodities that are produced by various industries. Final demand tables detail the commodities bought by many categories of buyers (consumers, industries, non-profit institutions and government) for both consumption and investment purposes. These tables allow users to track intersectoral exchanges of goods and services between industries and final demand categories such as personal expenditures, capital expenditures and public sector expenditures.

    There are four levels of detail: the “Detailed” level with 235 industries, 470 commodities and 280 final demand categories, the “Link 1997” level (the most detailed level that allows the construction of consistent time series of annual data from 1997) with 188 industries, 466 commodities and 261 final demand categories, the “Link 1961” level (the most detailed level that allows the construction of consistent time series of annual data from 1961) with 112 industries, 246 commodities and 145 final demand categories, and the “Summary” level with 35 industries, 74 commodities and 25 final demand categories.

    Release date: 2014-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201400614109
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) covering the period 2011 to 2013 have been released along with those for the first and second quarters of 2014. These revised estimates incorporate the most current source data and seasonal patterns.

    Release date: 2014-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201400414107
    Description:

    Beginning in November 2014, International Trade in goods data will be provided on a Balance of Payments (BOP) basis for additional country detail. In publishing this data, BOP-based exports to and imports from 27 countries, referred to as Canada’s Principal Trading Partners (PTPs), will be highlighted for the first time. BOP-based trade in goods data will be available for countries such as China and Mexico, Brazil and India, South Korea, and our largest European Union trading partners, in response to substantial demand for information on these countries in recent years. Until now, Canada’s geographical trading patterns have been examined almost exclusively through analysis of Customs-based trade data. Moreover, BOP trade in goods data for these countries will be available alongside the now quarterly Trade in Services data as well as annual Foreign Direct Investment data for many of these Principal Trading Partners, facilitating country-level international trade and investment analysis using fully comparable data. The objective of this article is to introduce these new measures. This note will first walk users through the key BOP concepts, most importantly the concept of change in ownership. This will serve to familiarize analysts with the Balance of Payments framework for analyzing country-level data, in contrast to Customs-based trade data. Second, some preliminary analysis will be reviewed to illustrate the concepts, with provisional estimates for BOP-based trade with China serving as the principal example. Lastly, we will outline the expansion of quarterly trade in services to generate new estimates of trade for the PTPs and discuss future work in trade statistics.

    Release date: 2014-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2014001
    Description:

    This presentation focuses on changes in the Canadian economic data subsequent to the 2008-09 recession, and emphasizes recent developments through the first two quarters of 2014. The material in the presentation is organized around three broad themes: (1) output and jobs, (2) wealth in the household sector, and (3) international trade. Graphical information is based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on September 30, 2014.

    This presentation complements the September release of Recent Developments in Canada’s Economy: Fall 2014, a semi-annual article that provides an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices.

    Release date: 2014-10-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014095
    Description:

    This paper examines the investment performance of Canada and the United States, exploring similarities and differences in investments in fixed assets over the 1990-to-2011 period. This is a period when the two countries experienced different shocks. The United States suffered from a major decline in its housing markets after 2007 that did not hit Canada. The world-resource boom in the post-2000 period had a greater impact on Canada than it did on the United States. The Canada–United States exchange rate appreciated dramatically after 2003 thereby making imported machinery and equipment relatively less expensive in Canada.

    The comparison is primarily based on investment intensity, measured as the ratio of nominal dollar investment to nominal gross domestic product (GDP), but rates of growth of the volume of investment relative to the volume of GDP are also compared.

    Release date: 2014-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201400314106
    Description:

    The methodology for estimating the Flows and Stocks of Fixed Capital has been redeveloped to ensure greater coherence of the capital stock program within the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA). This is done by incorporating investment flows directly from the CSMA on a detailed industry/asset basis. The data released will be based on the input-output final demand classification, with updated per asset depreciation profiles and prices.

    Release date: 2014-10-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2014076
    Description:

    This article provides estimates on the value of cross-border shopping in the United States from 2006 to 2012, on an annual and quarterly basis. The study provides detailed values for overnight and same-day spending in the United States, postal and courier imports and motor vehicle imports. Total cross-border expenditures are compared to the Canadian retail trade sales, to provide a basis of comparison on the magnitude of these expenditures. The extent to which cross-border spending varies with movements in the Canadian/United States exchange rate is also examined. The cross-border estimates are derived from the Canadian System of National Accounts and their underlying survey and administrative data sources. The estimates are based on three different scenarios (low, medium and high) with each scenario based on different statistical assumptions. The low scenario represents the lower-bound estimates for cross-border shopping, while the high scenario represents the upper-bound estimates. The medium scenario is based on assumptions deemed to be the most plausible. All assumptions reflect professional judgement and build upon previous analysis.

    Release date: 2014-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201400214100
    Description:

    Canadian international merchandise trade data are released monthly and may be revised in subsequent releases as new information becomes available. These data are released approximately 35 days following the close of the reference period and represent one of the timeliest economic indicators produced by Statistics Canada. Given their timeliness, some of the data are not received in time and need to be estimated or modelled. This is the case for imports and exports of crude petroleum and natural gas. More specifically, at the time of release, energy trade data are based on an incomplete set of information and are revised as Statistics Canada and National Energy Board information becomes available in the subsequent months. Due to the increasing importance of energy imports and exports and the timeliness of the data, the revisions to energy prices and volumes are having an increasingly significant impact on the monthly revision to Canada’s trade balance. This note explains how the estimates in the initial release are made when data sources are not yet available, and how the original data are adjusted in subsequent releases.

    Release date: 2014-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014039
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first half of 2014. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on September 16, 2014.

    Release date: 2014-09-26

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-09-24

  • Index and guides: 16-507-X2014001
    Description:

    These educational resources provide instructors with innovative materials, lesson plans and case study assignments to accompany the 2013 release of the Human Activity and the Environment article, “Measuring ecosystem goods and services in Canada.” The materials and activities were developed by the Critical Thinking Consortium, a non-profit, registered association of 55 educational partners—school districts, schools, teacher associations and other educational organizations.

    Resources were developed for a junior high school, senior high school and introductory post-secondary audience. Curriculum links include grades 7 to 12 geography, social studies, biology, science and economics, as well as introductory post-secondary geography and environmental science.

    Release date: 2014-09-24

Data (11)

Data (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Table: 15-210-X
    Description:

    This product presents estimates of gross output by industry, in current dollars, evaluated at modified basic price for all provinces and territories. These estimates are derived from the provincial Input-Output tables.

    Gross output consists of those goods and services that are produced within an establishment that become available for use outside that establishment, plus any goods and services produced for own final use.

    The modified basic price for a good or service is its selling price at the boundary of the producing establishment excluding sales and excise taxes levied after the final stage of production. This price includes subsidies, in the sense that it is not adjusted for subsidies received by the producer. Modified basic price is the most easily observable transaction price. It equals the purchaser price less transport, trade and tax margins involved in delivering the product to the purchaser.

    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • Table: 15-209-X
    Description:

    This product presents estimates of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by industry, in current dollars, evaluated at basic price for all provinces and territories. These estimates are derived from the provincial Input-Output tables.

    GDP measures the unduplicated value of production. The GDP by industry estimates are derived using a "value added" approach, that is, the value that a producer adds to their intermediate inputs before generating their own output. This allows not only for the computation of total economic production but also the industrial composition and origin of the economic production.

    When evaluated at basic prices, an industry's GDP is the sum of its factor incomes (wages and salaries, supplementary labour income, mixed income and other operating surplus) plus taxes less subsidies on production (labour and capital).

    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • Table: 15F0042X
    Description:

    The Input-Output accounting system consists of three tables. The input tables (USE tables) detail the commodities that are consumed by various industries. Output tables (MAKE tables) detail the commodities that are produced by various industries. Final demand tables detail the commodities bought by many categories of buyers (consumers, industries, non-profit institutions and government) for both consumption and investment purposes. These tables allow users to track intersectoral exchanges of goods and services between industries and final demand categories such as personal expenditures, capital expenditures and public sector expenditures.

    The provincial input-output tables are constructed every year starting with the 1997 tables. The tables are only available at the “Summary” level with 35 industries, 74 commodities and 25 final demand categories.

    Release date: 2014-11-05

  • Table: 15F0041X
    Description:

    The Input-Output accounting system consists of three tables. The input tables (USE tables) detail the commodities that are consumed by various industries. Output tables (MAKE tables) detail the commodities that are produced by various industries. Final demand tables detail the commodities bought by many categories of buyers (consumers, industries, non-profit institutions and government) for both consumption and investment purposes. These tables allow users to track intersectoral exchanges of goods and services between industries and final demand categories such as personal expenditures, capital expenditures and public sector expenditures.

    There are four levels of detail: the “Detailed” level with 235 industries, 470 commodities and 280 final demand categories, the “Link 1997” level (the most detailed level that allows the construction of consistent time series of annual data from 1997) with 188 industries, 466 commodities and 261 final demand categories, the “Link 1961” level (the most detailed level that allows the construction of consistent time series of annual data from 1961) with 112 industries, 246 commodities and 145 final demand categories, and the “Summary” level with 35 industries, 74 commodities and 25 final demand categories.

    Release date: 2014-11-05

  • Table: 61-205-X
    Description:

    This publication presents capital and repair expenditures on construction and on machinery and equipment for divisions and industries at the Canada level and by division at the provincial level. The report also provides the split between private and public investment. The tabulations focus on capital spending intentions for the coming year, preliminary estimates of actual investment for the current year and the actual investment for the previous year. The investment data are gathered from about 25,000 establishments and establishment groups in Canadian businesses, institutions and governments.

    Release date: 2014-02-28

Analysis (43)

Analysis (43) (25 of 43 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014005
    Description:

    In 2010, the Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. The CIUS consists of a household component that measures home access, and an individual component that measures online behaviours, including the use of e-commerce.

    These infographics describe some results of the Canadian Internet Use and e-Commerce survey of 2010.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X201400014117
    Description:

    The 2014 article “Agriculture in Canada” gathers together a variety of statistics describing agriculture from the perspective of ecosystem goods and services.

    The article addresses the ecological infrastructure supporting agricultural activity (Section 2), ecosystem goods and services from agriculture (Section 3), the main beneficiaries of these goods and services (Section 4) and the environmental impacts and management activities associated with agriculture (Section 5). Section 6 provides an example to illustrate how agricultural information can be integrated into a system of environmental accounts that follow international guidelines being developed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Section 7 concludes with a short listing of areas requiring further research.

    Release date: 2014-11-13

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014042
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents estimates of census metropolitan area gross domestic product (GDP) from 2001 to 2009. It examines the level of metropolitan area GDP, the contribution of metropolitan areas to national GDP, and how GDP per capita varies across metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2014-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201400514088
    Description:

    An overview of the Canadian Government Finance Statistics (CGFS) framework; how it relates to other government statistics such as the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts and the Public Accounts; and the new GFS data products available to users

    Release date: 2014-11-07

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201400614109
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) covering the period 2011 to 2013 have been released along with those for the first and second quarters of 2014. These revised estimates incorporate the most current source data and seasonal patterns.

    Release date: 2014-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201400414107
    Description:

    Beginning in November 2014, International Trade in goods data will be provided on a Balance of Payments (BOP) basis for additional country detail. In publishing this data, BOP-based exports to and imports from 27 countries, referred to as Canada’s Principal Trading Partners (PTPs), will be highlighted for the first time. BOP-based trade in goods data will be available for countries such as China and Mexico, Brazil and India, South Korea, and our largest European Union trading partners, in response to substantial demand for information on these countries in recent years. Until now, Canada’s geographical trading patterns have been examined almost exclusively through analysis of Customs-based trade data. Moreover, BOP trade in goods data for these countries will be available alongside the now quarterly Trade in Services data as well as annual Foreign Direct Investment data for many of these Principal Trading Partners, facilitating country-level international trade and investment analysis using fully comparable data. The objective of this article is to introduce these new measures. This note will first walk users through the key BOP concepts, most importantly the concept of change in ownership. This will serve to familiarize analysts with the Balance of Payments framework for analyzing country-level data, in contrast to Customs-based trade data. Second, some preliminary analysis will be reviewed to illustrate the concepts, with provisional estimates for BOP-based trade with China serving as the principal example. Lastly, we will outline the expansion of quarterly trade in services to generate new estimates of trade for the PTPs and discuss future work in trade statistics.

    Release date: 2014-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2014001
    Description:

    This presentation focuses on changes in the Canadian economic data subsequent to the 2008-09 recession, and emphasizes recent developments through the first two quarters of 2014. The material in the presentation is organized around three broad themes: (1) output and jobs, (2) wealth in the household sector, and (3) international trade. Graphical information is based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on September 30, 2014.

    This presentation complements the September release of Recent Developments in Canada’s Economy: Fall 2014, a semi-annual article that provides an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices.

    Release date: 2014-10-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014095
    Description:

    This paper examines the investment performance of Canada and the United States, exploring similarities and differences in investments in fixed assets over the 1990-to-2011 period. This is a period when the two countries experienced different shocks. The United States suffered from a major decline in its housing markets after 2007 that did not hit Canada. The world-resource boom in the post-2000 period had a greater impact on Canada than it did on the United States. The Canada–United States exchange rate appreciated dramatically after 2003 thereby making imported machinery and equipment relatively less expensive in Canada.

    The comparison is primarily based on investment intensity, measured as the ratio of nominal dollar investment to nominal gross domestic product (GDP), but rates of growth of the volume of investment relative to the volume of GDP are also compared.

    Release date: 2014-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201400314106
    Description:

    The methodology for estimating the Flows and Stocks of Fixed Capital has been redeveloped to ensure greater coherence of the capital stock program within the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA). This is done by incorporating investment flows directly from the CSMA on a detailed industry/asset basis. The data released will be based on the input-output final demand classification, with updated per asset depreciation profiles and prices.

    Release date: 2014-10-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2014076
    Description:

    This article provides estimates on the value of cross-border shopping in the United States from 2006 to 2012, on an annual and quarterly basis. The study provides detailed values for overnight and same-day spending in the United States, postal and courier imports and motor vehicle imports. Total cross-border expenditures are compared to the Canadian retail trade sales, to provide a basis of comparison on the magnitude of these expenditures. The extent to which cross-border spending varies with movements in the Canadian/United States exchange rate is also examined. The cross-border estimates are derived from the Canadian System of National Accounts and their underlying survey and administrative data sources. The estimates are based on three different scenarios (low, medium and high) with each scenario based on different statistical assumptions. The low scenario represents the lower-bound estimates for cross-border shopping, while the high scenario represents the upper-bound estimates. The medium scenario is based on assumptions deemed to be the most plausible. All assumptions reflect professional judgement and build upon previous analysis.

    Release date: 2014-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201400214100
    Description:

    Canadian international merchandise trade data are released monthly and may be revised in subsequent releases as new information becomes available. These data are released approximately 35 days following the close of the reference period and represent one of the timeliest economic indicators produced by Statistics Canada. Given their timeliness, some of the data are not received in time and need to be estimated or modelled. This is the case for imports and exports of crude petroleum and natural gas. More specifically, at the time of release, energy trade data are based on an incomplete set of information and are revised as Statistics Canada and National Energy Board information becomes available in the subsequent months. Due to the increasing importance of energy imports and exports and the timeliness of the data, the revisions to energy prices and volumes are having an increasingly significant impact on the monthly revision to Canada’s trade balance. This note explains how the estimates in the initial release are made when data sources are not yet available, and how the original data are adjusted in subsequent releases.

    Release date: 2014-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014039
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first half of 2014. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on September 16, 2014.

    Release date: 2014-09-26

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-09-24

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-09-18

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2014075
    Description:

    The Culture Satellite Account (CSA) measures the economic importance of culture and sport in Canada. The CSA extracts economic information on culture and sport from the System of National Accounts (SNA). It uses the same measures of inputs, outputs, and GDP as the System of National Accounts, and reorganizes information on culture following the Canadian Framework for Culture Statistics 2011 (CFCS).

    Release date: 2014-09-10

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-09-09

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-08-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014094
    Description:

    This report compares household net worth per capita in Canada and the United States from 1970 to 2012, using data from the Canadian National Balance Sheet Accounts and the Flow of Funds Accounts published by the U.S. Federal Reserve.

    Three approaches are adopted. The first makes a level comparison using values adjusted for purchasing power parity (PPP). The second uses ratios of real net worth per capita and net worth relative to disposable income. The third decomposes the growth of the ratio of net worth to disposable income. Together, these approaches provide mutually re-enforcing results that are more robust than what could be derived from any one approach in isolation.

    Release date: 2014-08-20

Reference (6)

Reference (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Index and guides: 16-507-X2014001
    Description:

    These educational resources provide instructors with innovative materials, lesson plans and case study assignments to accompany the 2013 release of the Human Activity and the Environment article, “Measuring ecosystem goods and services in Canada.” The materials and activities were developed by the Critical Thinking Consortium, a non-profit, registered association of 55 educational partners—school districts, schools, teacher associations and other educational organizations.

    Resources were developed for a junior high school, senior high school and introductory post-secondary audience. Curriculum links include grades 7 to 12 geography, social studies, biology, science and economics, as well as introductory post-secondary geography and environmental science.

    Release date: 2014-09-24

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014038
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the productivity program at Statistics Canada and a brief description of Canada’s productivity performance. The paper defines productivity and the various measures that are used to investigate different aspects of productivity growth. It describes the difference between partial productivity measures (such as labour productivity) and a more complete measure (multifactor productivity) and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The paper explains why productivity is important. It outlines how productivity growth fits into the growth accounting framework and how this framework is used to examine the various sources of economic growth. The paper briefly discusses the challenges that face statisticians in measuring productivity growth. It also provides an overview of Canada’s long-term productivity performance and compares Canada to the United States—both in terms of productivity levels and productivity growth rates.

    Release date: 2014-09-15

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014037
    Description:

    This paper presents estimates of effective multifactor productivity (MFP) growth for Canada, the United States, Australia, Japan and selected European Union (EU) countries, based on the EU KLEMS productivity database and the World Input-Output Tables. Effective MFP growth captures the impact of the productivity gains in upstream industries on the productivity growth and international competitiveness of domestic industries, thereby providing an appropriate measure of productivity growth and international competitiveness in the production of final demand products such as consumption, investment and export products. A substantial portion of MFP growth, especially for small, open economies such as Canada’s, is attributable to gains in the production of intermediate inputs in foreign countries. Productivity growth tends to be higher in investment and export products than for the production of consumption products. Technical progress and productivity growth in foreign countries have made a larger contribution to production growth in investment and export products than in consumption products. The analysis provides empirical evidence consistent with the hypothesis that effective MFP growth is a more informative relevant indicator of international competitiveness than is standard MFP growth.

    Release date: 2014-09-09

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014036
    Description:

    Leasing is an important means of gaining access to assets, of obtaining finance, and of reducing a lessee’s exposure to the risks inherent to asset ownership. A lease can be either a financial lease (capital lease) or an operating lease (capital rental). A financial lease is one where the legal owner of an asset (lessor) passes the economic ownership to the user of the asset (lessee), who then accepts the operating risks and receives the economic benefits from using the asset in a productive activity. Under an operating lease, the lessor is both the legal owner and the economic owner of the asset leased (rented), bearing the operating risks and receiving the economic benefits from the asset. The lessor transfers only the right to use the asset to the lessee.

    Leasing offers firms the possibility to acquire the right to use capital assets under terms that differ from those prevailing through other financial instruments. The recording of leased assets in the Canadian System of National Accounts is ownership-based rather than user-based. The separation of capital ownership, in particular legal ownership, from the use of capital assets poses challenges to productivity measurement. To obtain consistent productivity measures at an industry level, leased and rented capital assets must be reallocated from owners’ accounts to users’ accounts. By using the General Index of Financial Information (GIFI) corporate balance sheets and detailed input-output tables, this paper tests the robustness of existing practices of data collection on leased and rented capital.

    Release date: 2014-07-22

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014035
    Description:

    This paper highlights revisions to multifactor productivity (MFP) growth and related variables in the business sector and in individual industries, which resulted from the historical revision of the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA) released October 1, 2012, revisions to the labour productivity accounts released October 12, 2012, and changes in the estimation of capital input that were made in order to improve its consistency in industry MFP growth estimates.

    The multifactor productivity program produces indexes of MFP and related measures (output, capital input, labour input and intermediate inputs) for the business sector, broad economic sub-sectors, and their constituent industries. The MFP program divides growth in labour productivity into its key determinants: capital intensity (changes in capital per hour worked), investment in human capital, and MFP, which includes technological change, organizational innovation and economies of scale.

    Release date: 2014-07-08

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014033
    Description:

    This paper examines and compares labour productivity in Canada and the United States for small and large firms over the period from 2002 to 2008. It quantifies the relative importance of small and large firms in Canada and the United States and measures the relative productivity levels of small versus large firms.

    Small firms are relatively more important in the Canadian economy. Small firms are less productive than large firms in both countries. But the productivity disadvantage of small relative to large firms was higher in Canada.

    The paper provides an estimate of the impact that these differences have on the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States. It first estimates the changes that would occur in Canadian aggregate labour productivity if the share of hours worked of large firms in Canada was increased to the U.S. level. It then quantifies the impact of increasing the relative productivity of small to large firms in Canada up to the relative productivity ratio of small firms to large firms that existed in the United States.

    Together, decreasing the relative importance of small firms in the economy and increasing their relative productivity compared to large firms accounts for most of the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States in 2002. However, changes in the economy that occurred between 2002 and 2008 reduced the contribution of the small-firm sector to the gap in productivity levels.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

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