Statistics by subject – Educational attainment

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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114247
    Description:

    This article examines regional differences in the math and reading skills of immigrant children aged 15 based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). It also examines regional differences in high-school and university completion rates among young immigrants who came to Canada before the age of 15 using National Household Survey (NHS) data. Throughout the article, comparisons are made with the children of the Canadian-born (third- or higher-generation Canadians).

    Release date: 2015-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114221
    Description:

    This article examines the differences in the location of study of immigrant adults aged 25 to 64 with a university education (i.e., with at least a bachelor’s degree). It provides results by period of immigration (pre-1990, the 1990s, and the 2000s) and provides a more in-depth analysis of factors that are linked to the location of study for the most recent cohort of immigrants (i.e., those who immigrated in 2000 or later).

    Release date: 2015-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20070029989
    Description:

    Between the ages of 15 and 19, youth have three decisions to make: first, whether or not to graduate from high school; second, whether or not to go to postsecondary education; and finally, the type of institution in which to pursue that postsecondary education. Using data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), this article examines these pathways to see if there are any differences between the provinces in the choices made by boys versus girls and by youth from lower-income backgrounds versus those from higher-income backgrounds. The target population for the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), cohort A includes all 15 year-old students enrolled in an educational institution in Canada on December 31, 1999. Students were initially interviewed in April or May of 2000 and re-interviewed in February to May of 2002 and again, between February and June of 2004. Youth were questioned about their school and work activities for the two-year period directly prior to the interview date. Thus, the high school dropout and postsecondary participation rates presented here refer to the youth's schooling status as of December 2003, the last date for which data were collected. These results are representative of Canadian youth who were 15 years old as of December 1999.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059589
    Description:

    In an increasingly knowledge-based economy, the key to equity in economic opportunity lies in equity in access to a university education. Attending university is a costly undertaking. One aspect of the costs is distance, for the many who do not live within commuting distance of a university. Using census data, a new study looks at the impact the creation of seven new universities : in British Columbia, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia : in the last 25 years has had on university attendance of local youth. The impact is positive, but not shared equally among all youth.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114247
    Description:

    This article examines regional differences in the math and reading skills of immigrant children aged 15 based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). It also examines regional differences in high-school and university completion rates among young immigrants who came to Canada before the age of 15 using National Household Survey (NHS) data. Throughout the article, comparisons are made with the children of the Canadian-born (third- or higher-generation Canadians).

    Release date: 2015-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114221
    Description:

    This article examines the differences in the location of study of immigrant adults aged 25 to 64 with a university education (i.e., with at least a bachelor’s degree). It provides results by period of immigration (pre-1990, the 1990s, and the 2000s) and provides a more in-depth analysis of factors that are linked to the location of study for the most recent cohort of immigrants (i.e., those who immigrated in 2000 or later).

    Release date: 2015-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20070029989
    Description:

    Between the ages of 15 and 19, youth have three decisions to make: first, whether or not to graduate from high school; second, whether or not to go to postsecondary education; and finally, the type of institution in which to pursue that postsecondary education. Using data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), this article examines these pathways to see if there are any differences between the provinces in the choices made by boys versus girls and by youth from lower-income backgrounds versus those from higher-income backgrounds. The target population for the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), cohort A includes all 15 year-old students enrolled in an educational institution in Canada on December 31, 1999. Students were initially interviewed in April or May of 2000 and re-interviewed in February to May of 2002 and again, between February and June of 2004. Youth were questioned about their school and work activities for the two-year period directly prior to the interview date. Thus, the high school dropout and postsecondary participation rates presented here refer to the youth's schooling status as of December 2003, the last date for which data were collected. These results are representative of Canadian youth who were 15 years old as of December 1999.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059589
    Description:

    In an increasingly knowledge-based economy, the key to equity in economic opportunity lies in equity in access to a university education. Attending university is a costly undertaking. One aspect of the costs is distance, for the many who do not live within commuting distance of a university. Using census data, a new study looks at the impact the creation of seven new universities : in British Columbia, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia : in the last 25 years has had on university attendance of local youth. The impact is positive, but not shared equally among all youth.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

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