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All (34)

All (34) (25 of 34 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410311
    Description:

    The transition to adulthood is often viewed as a period where young people move by stages into adult roles: completing their schooling, leaving their parents' home, acquiring permanent work, finding a partner or spouse and becoming a parent. In recent years, social scientists have found that the transition to adulthood is taking longer to complete. Using census data to compare young adults in 1971 to those in 2001, it assesses just how lengthy the delay has become.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610613165
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2000, and particularly the latter half of the 1990s, the earnings gap widened between young workers who were less-educated and those who were well-educated. Some research attributes the gap to technological change, which requires a workforce that is more skilled and better educated. The subsequent demand resulted in higher wages for such workers and hence increased returns to education. However, the past five years have seen strong job growth in industries that employ many young people with less education. How has the earnings gap been affected?

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030028448
    Description:

    This profile gives provincial level information on the presence of teacher-librarians, library technicians and other library staff in Canadian schools.

    Release date: 2005-08-23

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20030017698
    Description:

    This paper reviews the implementation of the international CensusAtSchool and related projects. It emphasizes how to the involvement and support of various levels of government statistical services have contributed to the project's success.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016740
    Description:

    Controlling for differences in student populations, we examine the contribution of schools to provincial differences in the reading, math and science achievement of 15-year-olds in this paper. Using a semi-parametric decomposition technique developed by DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (1996) for differences in distributions, we find that school differences contribute to provincial differences in different parts of the achievement distribution and that the effect varies by province and by type of skill, even within province. For example, school differences account for about 32% of the difference in mean reading achievement between New Brunswick and Alberta, but reduce the difference in the proportion of students performing at the lowest reading proficiency level. By contrast, school differences account for 94% of the New Brunswick-Alberta gap in the 10th percentile of the science distribution. Our results demonstrate that school effectiveness studies that focus on the first moment of the achievement distribution miss potentially important impacts for specific students.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036701
    Description:

    This article examines how the educational profiles of francophones, anglophones and allophones have changed over the past 30 years, and the factors that have contributed to many of these changes.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036703
    Description:

    This article examines the changing educational attainment profile of Canadians using census data.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016530
    Description:

    This study looks at Canadian 15-year-old students' use of information and communication technologies at home and at school.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010046385
    Description:

    Using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment, this article examines issues relating to access and use of information and communications technology (ICT). The issues under study include: - the extent to which Canadian youth have access to and use ICT; - how access to and use of ICT by Canadian youth compares with that of children in other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries; - the relationship of ICT access and use to a student's gender; - whether the child was born in Canada; - the province lived in; - the school attended; and - socio-economic status.

    Release date: 2002-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000035385
    Description:

    This article looks at the changes and development of education in Canada during the 20th century.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015850
    Description:

    This attempt at a synthesis will centre around three questions: "What do we know about children and youth at risk?" "What do we need to know?" and "What are the major policy issues surrounding this area that might be informed by research?"

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19980015034
    Description:

    A model of secondary school progression has been estimated using data from the 1991 School Leavers Survey conducted by Statistics Canada. The data on which the school progression model was based comprised current educational status and responses to retrospective questions on the timing of schooling events. These data were sufficient for approximate reconstruction of educational event histories of each respondent. The school progression model was designed to be included in a larger, continuous time micro-simulation model. Its main features involve estimation -- by age, month of birth and season for both sexes in each province -- of rates of graduation, of dropout, of return and of dropout graduation. Estimation was reinforced with auxiliary 1991 Census and administative data.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014699
    Description:

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this article analyses the effects of family relationship processes and family member characteristics on the school achievement of boys and girls aged 6 to 11 years.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024659
    Description:

    This article looks at university graduates with bachelor's degrees who entered a college program within two years of graduating.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980044653
    Description:

    This paper is a joint project of Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada which uses data from the Canada Sudent Loans Program administrative data system to examine general patterns of Canada Student Loan debt in the 1990-91 to 1995-96 time frame for all full-time students, as well as specific trends in student debt by type of educational institution attended. It does not examine loans received through provincial programs. First, we look at the number of students with Canada Student Loans who entered into repayment and the average values of their loans in 1995 constant dollars. We then go on to analyse trends in loan activity and replayment patterns, including repayment difficulties, loan defaults and bankruptcies, and early repayment in full.

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014576
    Description:

    This article looks at methods used in finding a job after graduation and the criteria for choosing a job.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990014410
    Description:

    As students are increasingly pressured to find new ways of funding their education, many turn to student loan programs for assistance, and, as a result, are faced with a post-graduation debt load. Using data from the National Graduates Survey, this study assesses the debt and repayment record for holders of college certificates and diplomas, and bachelor's degrees. It also examines the effect of high debt on these graduates. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Social Trends published in Winter 1998.)

    Release date: 1999-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980034002
    Description:

    This article examines the extent of indebtedness, the repayment record and the impact of high debt on postsecondary graduates who used government loans to help finance their studies.

    Release date: 1998-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980034004
    Description:

    This article examines the literacy profiles of anglophones and francophones, in terms of such variables as education, age and reading habits.

    Release date: 1998-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014023
    Description:

    The primary goal of this chapter is to improve our understanding of the roles that family structure and low-income play in the determination of psychiatric disorders, poor school performance, and social problems among Canadian children. While there is broad agreement that environmental factors have an impact on these outcomes, until recently there has been little or no Canadian data with which to assess the importance of socio-economic factors in determining the incidence and severity of such problems.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970043733
    Description:

    At the start of every school year, not all children head off to the classroom. Instead, some Canadian families choose an alternative form of education that is commonly known as home schooling or home-based education. Helped by the establishment of regionally based support groups and national organizations, the home-schooling movement has been growing in acceptance in North America.

    Release date: 1998-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970033623
    Description:

    This paper, which examines, pathways pursued by undergraduate degree students in Ontario, is the first of a series of articles that will be developed as a result of this research. Students who entered undergraduate programs, either bachelor's or first professional programs, in Ontario from 1980 to 1984 (entry cohort) were traced from entry until the 1992-93 academic year. As a result, students had eight or more years during which they might have completed the requirements of their programs, at either the university in which they first enrolled or another Ontario university. In particular, the age of entry, program choices, completion rate and duration of study for the entry cohort are examined in this paper. As this first paper is limited to one province, some students who did not graduate may have completed their program requirements elsewhere. Nonetheless, results presented provide useful information on students's study patterns that was previously unavailable.

    Release date: 1998-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960033174
    Description:

    Canada has become a world leader in hosting international students. Ranked fifth in the world in 1992, Canada was behind only the United States, France, Germany and the United Kingdom in the number of international postsecondary students hosted. At all levels during the 1993-94 school year, approximately 87,000 international students were studying in Canadian universities, colleges and schools. Although their stay in Canada is usually temporary, international students often bring both cultural and financial benefits. Their presence can enrich Canadian campuses by contributing to a culturally and intellectually diverse learning environment. Also, their enrolment may generate additional revenues for educational institutions at a time when education budgets are under severe pressure. The impact of international students often extends beyond their period of study and their ties with Canada can continue long after they return to their countries.

    Release date: 1996-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022887
    Description:

    This article, also based on the IALS, compares the literacy levels of workers aged 16 to 65 in Canada, the United States and Germany. Of particular interest are the low scores achieved by a significant minority of Canadian workers. As expected, a relationship exists between literacy skills, occupation and industry.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950042818
    Description:

    The healthy immigrant effect observed in other countries also prevails in Canada. Immigrants, especially recent immigrants, are less likely than the Canadian-born population to have chronic conditions or disabilities. The effect is most evident among those from non-European countries, who constitute the majority of recent immigrants to Canada. This article compares the health status, health care utilization, and health-related behaviour of immigrants with the Canadian-born population, and is based on self-reported data from the 1994-95 National Population Health Survey. Health status is examined in terms of chronic conditions, disability and health-related dependency. The indicators of health care utilization are hospitalization, contact with physicians and dentists, unmet needs for health services. The health- related and behaviours analysed are smoking and leisure time physical activity.

    Release date: 1996-04-02

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Analysis (30)

Analysis (30) (25 of 30 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410311
    Description:

    The transition to adulthood is often viewed as a period where young people move by stages into adult roles: completing their schooling, leaving their parents' home, acquiring permanent work, finding a partner or spouse and becoming a parent. In recent years, social scientists have found that the transition to adulthood is taking longer to complete. Using census data to compare young adults in 1971 to those in 2001, it assesses just how lengthy the delay has become.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610613165
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2000, and particularly the latter half of the 1990s, the earnings gap widened between young workers who were less-educated and those who were well-educated. Some research attributes the gap to technological change, which requires a workforce that is more skilled and better educated. The subsequent demand resulted in higher wages for such workers and hence increased returns to education. However, the past five years have seen strong job growth in industries that employ many young people with less education. How has the earnings gap been affected?

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030028448
    Description:

    This profile gives provincial level information on the presence of teacher-librarians, library technicians and other library staff in Canadian schools.

    Release date: 2005-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036701
    Description:

    This article examines how the educational profiles of francophones, anglophones and allophones have changed over the past 30 years, and the factors that have contributed to many of these changes.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036703
    Description:

    This article examines the changing educational attainment profile of Canadians using census data.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016530
    Description:

    This study looks at Canadian 15-year-old students' use of information and communication technologies at home and at school.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010046385
    Description:

    Using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment, this article examines issues relating to access and use of information and communications technology (ICT). The issues under study include: - the extent to which Canadian youth have access to and use ICT; - how access to and use of ICT by Canadian youth compares with that of children in other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries; - the relationship of ICT access and use to a student's gender; - whether the child was born in Canada; - the province lived in; - the school attended; and - socio-economic status.

    Release date: 2002-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000035385
    Description:

    This article looks at the changes and development of education in Canada during the 20th century.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014699
    Description:

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this article analyses the effects of family relationship processes and family member characteristics on the school achievement of boys and girls aged 6 to 11 years.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024659
    Description:

    This article looks at university graduates with bachelor's degrees who entered a college program within two years of graduating.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980044653
    Description:

    This paper is a joint project of Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada which uses data from the Canada Sudent Loans Program administrative data system to examine general patterns of Canada Student Loan debt in the 1990-91 to 1995-96 time frame for all full-time students, as well as specific trends in student debt by type of educational institution attended. It does not examine loans received through provincial programs. First, we look at the number of students with Canada Student Loans who entered into repayment and the average values of their loans in 1995 constant dollars. We then go on to analyse trends in loan activity and replayment patterns, including repayment difficulties, loan defaults and bankruptcies, and early repayment in full.

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014576
    Description:

    This article looks at methods used in finding a job after graduation and the criteria for choosing a job.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990014410
    Description:

    As students are increasingly pressured to find new ways of funding their education, many turn to student loan programs for assistance, and, as a result, are faced with a post-graduation debt load. Using data from the National Graduates Survey, this study assesses the debt and repayment record for holders of college certificates and diplomas, and bachelor's degrees. It also examines the effect of high debt on these graduates. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Social Trends published in Winter 1998.)

    Release date: 1999-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980034002
    Description:

    This article examines the extent of indebtedness, the repayment record and the impact of high debt on postsecondary graduates who used government loans to help finance their studies.

    Release date: 1998-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980034004
    Description:

    This article examines the literacy profiles of anglophones and francophones, in terms of such variables as education, age and reading habits.

    Release date: 1998-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014023
    Description:

    The primary goal of this chapter is to improve our understanding of the roles that family structure and low-income play in the determination of psychiatric disorders, poor school performance, and social problems among Canadian children. While there is broad agreement that environmental factors have an impact on these outcomes, until recently there has been little or no Canadian data with which to assess the importance of socio-economic factors in determining the incidence and severity of such problems.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970043733
    Description:

    At the start of every school year, not all children head off to the classroom. Instead, some Canadian families choose an alternative form of education that is commonly known as home schooling or home-based education. Helped by the establishment of regionally based support groups and national organizations, the home-schooling movement has been growing in acceptance in North America.

    Release date: 1998-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970033623
    Description:

    This paper, which examines, pathways pursued by undergraduate degree students in Ontario, is the first of a series of articles that will be developed as a result of this research. Students who entered undergraduate programs, either bachelor's or first professional programs, in Ontario from 1980 to 1984 (entry cohort) were traced from entry until the 1992-93 academic year. As a result, students had eight or more years during which they might have completed the requirements of their programs, at either the university in which they first enrolled or another Ontario university. In particular, the age of entry, program choices, completion rate and duration of study for the entry cohort are examined in this paper. As this first paper is limited to one province, some students who did not graduate may have completed their program requirements elsewhere. Nonetheless, results presented provide useful information on students's study patterns that was previously unavailable.

    Release date: 1998-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960033174
    Description:

    Canada has become a world leader in hosting international students. Ranked fifth in the world in 1992, Canada was behind only the United States, France, Germany and the United Kingdom in the number of international postsecondary students hosted. At all levels during the 1993-94 school year, approximately 87,000 international students were studying in Canadian universities, colleges and schools. Although their stay in Canada is usually temporary, international students often bring both cultural and financial benefits. Their presence can enrich Canadian campuses by contributing to a culturally and intellectually diverse learning environment. Also, their enrolment may generate additional revenues for educational institutions at a time when education budgets are under severe pressure. The impact of international students often extends beyond their period of study and their ties with Canada can continue long after they return to their countries.

    Release date: 1996-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022887
    Description:

    This article, also based on the IALS, compares the literacy levels of workers aged 16 to 65 in Canada, the United States and Germany. Of particular interest are the low scores achieved by a significant minority of Canadian workers. As expected, a relationship exists between literacy skills, occupation and industry.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950042818
    Description:

    The healthy immigrant effect observed in other countries also prevails in Canada. Immigrants, especially recent immigrants, are less likely than the Canadian-born population to have chronic conditions or disabilities. The effect is most evident among those from non-European countries, who constitute the majority of recent immigrants to Canada. This article compares the health status, health care utilization, and health-related behaviour of immigrants with the Canadian-born population, and is based on self-reported data from the 1994-95 National Population Health Survey. Health status is examined in terms of chronic conditions, disability and health-related dependency. The indicators of health care utilization are hospitalization, contact with physicians and dentists, unmet needs for health services. The health- related and behaviours analysed are smoking and leisure time physical activity.

    Release date: 1996-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950042817
    Description:

    The sense of coherence a healthy outlook can be thought of as a mesure of positive health, that is, a factor promoting resilience which enables and individual to remain healthy. Based on National Population Health Survey (NPHS) data, three health measures were analyzed in relation to sense of coherence. The sense of coherence accounted for a substancial proportion of the total variance for two of the three measures. Theoretically, people with a healthy outlook are more able to cope successfully with trauma and stress. According to NPHS data, on average, those who reported at least one traumatic event had a lower sense of coherence than those who did not. For people who experienced trauma during childhood and young adulthood, yet had strong sense of coherence, the impact of that trauma on their health was diminished.

    Release date: 1996-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960012525
    Description:

    Who are they? Where do they work? And how do their earnings compare with those of men in similar circumstances? This article looks at the growth in entrepreneurship among women, and compares their characteristics with those of their male counterparts.

    Release date: 1996-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031636
    Description:

    Since the late seventies, 25 to 29 year-olds with only a secondary school education have had more difficulty finding employment, and much more difficulty obtaining well-paid work. A glance at the changes over time in the labour market "success" of 25 to 29 year-old secondary school graduates.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011778
    Description:

    Immigration is a major source of new workers. This article profiles Canada's "newest" workers and compares their characteristics with those of Canadian-born workers.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

Reference (4)

Reference (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20030017698
    Description:

    This paper reviews the implementation of the international CensusAtSchool and related projects. It emphasizes how to the involvement and support of various levels of government statistical services have contributed to the project's success.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016740
    Description:

    Controlling for differences in student populations, we examine the contribution of schools to provincial differences in the reading, math and science achievement of 15-year-olds in this paper. Using a semi-parametric decomposition technique developed by DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (1996) for differences in distributions, we find that school differences contribute to provincial differences in different parts of the achievement distribution and that the effect varies by province and by type of skill, even within province. For example, school differences account for about 32% of the difference in mean reading achievement between New Brunswick and Alberta, but reduce the difference in the proportion of students performing at the lowest reading proficiency level. By contrast, school differences account for 94% of the New Brunswick-Alberta gap in the 10th percentile of the science distribution. Our results demonstrate that school effectiveness studies that focus on the first moment of the achievement distribution miss potentially important impacts for specific students.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015850
    Description:

    This attempt at a synthesis will centre around three questions: "What do we know about children and youth at risk?" "What do we need to know?" and "What are the major policy issues surrounding this area that might be informed by research?"

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19980015034
    Description:

    A model of secondary school progression has been estimated using data from the 1991 School Leavers Survey conducted by Statistics Canada. The data on which the school progression model was based comprised current educational status and responses to retrospective questions on the timing of schooling events. These data were sufficient for approximate reconstruction of educational event histories of each respondent. The school progression model was designed to be included in a larger, continuous time micro-simulation model. Its main features involve estimation -- by age, month of birth and season for both sexes in each province -- of rates of graduation, of dropout, of return and of dropout graduation. Estimation was reinforced with auxiliary 1991 Census and administative data.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

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