Statistics by subject – Education, training and learning

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All (14)

All (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900210896
    Description:

    Previous analysis of data from the Youth in Transition Survey showed for the first time that reading proficiency at age 15 plays a significant role in both high school graduation and participation in postsecondary education by age 19. However, age 19 is still relatively early to have conclusive information on the educational outcomes of youth. This article takes advantage of more recent data from the Youth in Transition Survey to examine high school and postsecondary education outcomes for that same group of youth two years later, when they were 21 years old.

    Release date: 2009-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20070029994
    Description:

    Streaming or tracking of high school students through different sequences of core courses (e.g., english, science, mathematics) has been practised in Canada and other developed countries for decades. The practice has also been vigorously debated. This article examines the extent to which streaming of tenth-grade students was occurring in four provinces - Ontario, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia - in 2000, using data obtained from Cycle 1 of Statistics Canada's Youth in Transition (YITS) Survey. It also focuses on the impact of social background as measured by parents' education levels and family income on the course-selection choices made by 15 year-old high school students. In four provinces -- Ontario, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia -- the distinctions between the levels of courses taken by 15 year-old students (open PSE options vs college-only options) were clearest. As a result, the analysis reported here is based on data from those four provinces which accounted for about two-thirds of Canadian 15 year-olds in 2000.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059588
    Description:

    Today, disability is viewed more often as a social construct than a medical one. Educational reforms have changed the way in which children with disabilities are integrated into the school system. With data from the 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, this article looks at the prevalence of children with disabilities, whether they attend regular classes and the kind of conditions for which they need special services. It examines the issues about access to educational services needed : which services are most needed and used, and what barriers may get in the way of obtaining such services.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313160
    Description:

    Every year the Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP) provides approximately $1.5 billion in loans and $80 million in grants to students with a demonstrated financial need. Nevertheless, a gap in postsecondary participation remains between children from upper- and lower-income backgrounds. While it is difficult to estimate the extent to which the CSLP has made it possible for low-income students to obtain a postsecondary education, the study looks at how well loans are targeted to low-income youth, the extent to which the loan amount reflects financial need, and the impact of parental income.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038966
    Description:

    Studies of the postsecondary attainment of young adults are informative, but it is also useful to examine the educational aspirations of teenagers. Such studies profile the value placed on different types of formal education by youth as well as perceived opportunities for upward occupational mobility. This article explores the educational aspirations of 15-year-old visible minority immigrant students and compares them with those of Canadian-born youth who are not part of a visible minority group. It then identifies the most important factors that explain the large ethnocultural differences in university aspirations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016726
    Description:

    Although the use of school vouchers is growing in the developing world, the impact of vouchers is an open question. Any sort of long-term assessment of this activity is rare. This paper estimates the long-term effect of Colombia's PACES program, which provided over 125,000 poor children with vouchers that covered half the cost of private secondary school.

    The PACES program presents an unusual opportunity to assess the effect of demand-side education financing in a Latin American country where private schools educate a substantial proportion of pupils. The program is of special interest because many vouchers were assigned by lottery, so program effects can be reliably assessed.

    We use administrative records to assess the long-term impact of PACES vouchers on high school graduation status and test scores. The principal advantage of administrative records is that there is no loss-to-follow-up and the data are much cheaper than a costly and potentially dangerous survey effort. On the other hand, individual ID numbers may be inaccurate, complicating record linkage, and selection bias contaminates the sample of test-takers. We discuss solutions to these problems. The results suggest that the program increased secondary school completion rates, and that college-entrance test scores were higher for lottery winners than losers.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036216
    Description:

    This paper looks at family income and its impact on participation in postsecondary education, using the first wave of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015836
    Description:

    Alan King's presentation focussed on structural factors that affect students and put them at risk of not completing school, in addition to other serious health problems. His findings were drawn from previous work carried out in cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO) and a series of studies related to the health behaviour of children in school.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015846
    Description:

    This paper addressed the need for alternative education systems and programs for "at-risk" African-Canadian, visible minority, and First Nations children and youth.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014701
    Description:

    This article examines the influences of neighbourhood and family socio-economic characteristics on children's readiness to start school. It uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024604
    Description:

    Previous studies of the job skills gap have focused on the problem of workers with literacy deficits. Yet, in terms of the costs to individuals, firms and the national economy, literacy surplus (or underemployment) is equally important. This article examines the "fit" or "mismatch" between job requirements and workers' literacy skills, profiling patterns of literacy use and under-use in the labour market. (Adapted from a report published by Statistics Canada and Human Resources Development Canada.)

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980013595
    Description:

    Important literacy and training questions can now be addressed without being hampered by a lack of comparable training data. Based on the International Adult Literacy Survey, this article looks at employee training in seven countries, including Canada. Training effort, sources of support, motivation, and characteristics of trainees are examined.

    Release date: 1998-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199200141
    Description:

    Employment growth in the 1980s strongly favoured workers with good literacy skills. Labour market opportunities may continue to diminish for workers with inadequate literacy skills.

    Release date: 1992-03-03

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Analysis (11)

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  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900210896
    Description:

    Previous analysis of data from the Youth in Transition Survey showed for the first time that reading proficiency at age 15 plays a significant role in both high school graduation and participation in postsecondary education by age 19. However, age 19 is still relatively early to have conclusive information on the educational outcomes of youth. This article takes advantage of more recent data from the Youth in Transition Survey to examine high school and postsecondary education outcomes for that same group of youth two years later, when they were 21 years old.

    Release date: 2009-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20070029994
    Description:

    Streaming or tracking of high school students through different sequences of core courses (e.g., english, science, mathematics) has been practised in Canada and other developed countries for decades. The practice has also been vigorously debated. This article examines the extent to which streaming of tenth-grade students was occurring in four provinces - Ontario, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia - in 2000, using data obtained from Cycle 1 of Statistics Canada's Youth in Transition (YITS) Survey. It also focuses on the impact of social background as measured by parents' education levels and family income on the course-selection choices made by 15 year-old high school students. In four provinces -- Ontario, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia -- the distinctions between the levels of courses taken by 15 year-old students (open PSE options vs college-only options) were clearest. As a result, the analysis reported here is based on data from those four provinces which accounted for about two-thirds of Canadian 15 year-olds in 2000.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059588
    Description:

    Today, disability is viewed more often as a social construct than a medical one. Educational reforms have changed the way in which children with disabilities are integrated into the school system. With data from the 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, this article looks at the prevalence of children with disabilities, whether they attend regular classes and the kind of conditions for which they need special services. It examines the issues about access to educational services needed : which services are most needed and used, and what barriers may get in the way of obtaining such services.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313160
    Description:

    Every year the Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP) provides approximately $1.5 billion in loans and $80 million in grants to students with a demonstrated financial need. Nevertheless, a gap in postsecondary participation remains between children from upper- and lower-income backgrounds. While it is difficult to estimate the extent to which the CSLP has made it possible for low-income students to obtain a postsecondary education, the study looks at how well loans are targeted to low-income youth, the extent to which the loan amount reflects financial need, and the impact of parental income.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038966
    Description:

    Studies of the postsecondary attainment of young adults are informative, but it is also useful to examine the educational aspirations of teenagers. Such studies profile the value placed on different types of formal education by youth as well as perceived opportunities for upward occupational mobility. This article explores the educational aspirations of 15-year-old visible minority immigrant students and compares them with those of Canadian-born youth who are not part of a visible minority group. It then identifies the most important factors that explain the large ethnocultural differences in university aspirations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036216
    Description:

    This paper looks at family income and its impact on participation in postsecondary education, using the first wave of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014701
    Description:

    This article examines the influences of neighbourhood and family socio-economic characteristics on children's readiness to start school. It uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024604
    Description:

    Previous studies of the job skills gap have focused on the problem of workers with literacy deficits. Yet, in terms of the costs to individuals, firms and the national economy, literacy surplus (or underemployment) is equally important. This article examines the "fit" or "mismatch" between job requirements and workers' literacy skills, profiling patterns of literacy use and under-use in the labour market. (Adapted from a report published by Statistics Canada and Human Resources Development Canada.)

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980013595
    Description:

    Important literacy and training questions can now be addressed without being hampered by a lack of comparable training data. Based on the International Adult Literacy Survey, this article looks at employee training in seven countries, including Canada. Training effort, sources of support, motivation, and characteristics of trainees are examined.

    Release date: 1998-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199200141
    Description:

    Employment growth in the 1980s strongly favoured workers with good literacy skills. Labour market opportunities may continue to diminish for workers with inadequate literacy skills.

    Release date: 1992-03-03

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016726
    Description:

    Although the use of school vouchers is growing in the developing world, the impact of vouchers is an open question. Any sort of long-term assessment of this activity is rare. This paper estimates the long-term effect of Colombia's PACES program, which provided over 125,000 poor children with vouchers that covered half the cost of private secondary school.

    The PACES program presents an unusual opportunity to assess the effect of demand-side education financing in a Latin American country where private schools educate a substantial proportion of pupils. The program is of special interest because many vouchers were assigned by lottery, so program effects can be reliably assessed.

    We use administrative records to assess the long-term impact of PACES vouchers on high school graduation status and test scores. The principal advantage of administrative records is that there is no loss-to-follow-up and the data are much cheaper than a costly and potentially dangerous survey effort. On the other hand, individual ID numbers may be inaccurate, complicating record linkage, and selection bias contaminates the sample of test-takers. We discuss solutions to these problems. The results suggest that the program increased secondary school completion rates, and that college-entrance test scores were higher for lottery winners than losers.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015836
    Description:

    Alan King's presentation focussed on structural factors that affect students and put them at risk of not completing school, in addition to other serious health problems. His findings were drawn from previous work carried out in cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO) and a series of studies related to the health behaviour of children in school.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015846
    Description:

    This paper addressed the need for alternative education systems and programs for "at-risk" African-Canadian, visible minority, and First Nations children and youth.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

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