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All (493)

All (493) (25 of 493 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017395
    Description:

    This study uses large national longitudinal datasets to examine cross-cohort trends and within-cohort changes in earnings among three groups of young university graduates: immigrants who are former international students in Canada (Canadian-educated immigrants), foreign-educated immigrants who had a university degree before immigrating to Canada and the Canadian-born population.

    Release date: 2017-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017393
    Description:

    The increased migration of skilled workers globally has led to a focus in the immigration literature on the economic costs of unsuccessful labour market integration. Less attention has been given to the consequences of employment difficulties, such as those related to over-education, on aspects of immigrants’ subjective well-being. Although a large proportion of immigrants experience over-education, studies examining the relationship between over-education and life satisfaction tend to concentrate on the general population. These studies find a negative relationship between over-education and life satisfaction. Since immigrant and Canadian-born (non-immigrant) workers may experience over-education differently, it is important to examine this relationship in both groups. This study examines how over-education is associated with life satisfaction among university-educated immigrant and non-immigrant workers in Canada, and accounts for differences in the degree of over-education in each group.

    Release date: 2017-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114824
    Description:

    In this paper, multiple sources of data are used to study the profile and labour market outcomes of young men and women aged 25 to 34 without a high school diploma. The data sources include the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) and the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017071
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents the characteristics of families with children under the age of 18 who hold registered education savings plan (RESP) investments. The article also examines the relationship between holding an RESP account at age 15 and postsecondary enrolment between the ages of 19 and 27. The data are drawn from the 1999 and 2012 Survey of Financial Security and from the Youth in Transition Survey, Cohort A, linked to the T1 Family File. Postsecondary enrolment is derived from education deductions and tuition credits in the tax data.

    Release date: 2017-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017392
    Description:

    The registered education savings plan (RESP) savings vehicle is designed to encourage parents of school-age children to save for their children’s postsecondary education through tax sheltered earnings on contributions, as well as through additional contributions from the federal government. No recent evidence exists on the characteristics of RESP holders, and little exists on the association between having an RESP and enrolling in postsecondary education.

    This study makes three contributions to the literature. First, it documents differences in RESP holdings by family income and how these have evolved over time. Second, it decomposes these differences (particularly between the top and bottom quintiles of family income) into portions that are related to differences in key determinants of RESP participation (e.g., family wealth and parental education). And, third, it examines the relationship between having an RESP account and attending a postsecondary institution.

    Release date: 2017-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114798
    Description:

    This study uses a new longitudinal dataset that combines information from the Postsecondary Information System (PSIS) with personal income tax data to examine the labour market outcomes of graduates from universities in the Maritime provinces (Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick). In this pilot study, the outcomes of six cohorts of young people who graduated from a university in the Maritime provinces between 2006 and 2011 are examined, including 37,425 undergraduate degree holders (those with a bachelor’s degree) and 6,740 graduate degree holders (those with a master’s degree or a doctorate).

    Release date: 2017-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017070
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents postsecondary enrolment rates among 19-year-olds over the 2001-to-2014 period by province of parental residence, parental income and sex. The data are drawn from the T1 Family File. Postsecondary enrolment is determined by the tuition, education and textbook credits on the personal income tax files. Parental income refers to the adult-equivalent, after-tax income of parents, expressed in 2014 constant dollars. Youth are grouped by parental income quintiles.

    Release date: 2017-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017391
    Description:

    This paper assesses the extent to which education affects how Canadians save and accumulate wealth for retirement. The paper makes three contributions. First, a descriptive analysis is presented of differences in savings and home values across individuals based on their levels of educational attainment. To this end, new datasets that link survey respondents from the 1991 and 2006 censuses of Canada to their administrative tax records are used. These data provide a unique opportunity to jointly observe education, savings, home values, and a plethora of other factors of relevance. Second, the causal effect of high school completion on savings rates in tax-preferred accounts is estimated, exploiting compulsory schooling reforms in the identification. Third, building on a recent study by Messacar (2015), education is also found to affect how individuals re-optimize their savings rates in response to an automatic change in pension wealth accumulation. The implications of this study’s findings for the “nudge paradigm” in behavioural economics are discussed.

    Release date: 2017-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017388
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between occupational skill requirements and educational attainment (the highest level completed and the field of study). Using the 2011 National Household Survey matched to data from the Occupational Information Network (which contains information on occupational skill requirements), the study uncovers many new findings on the skill requirements of jobs held by Canadians aged 25 to 34 with different educational qualifications.

    Release date: 2017-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114692
    Description:

    This study analyses trends in co-operative education (co-op) participation for graduates with a college certificate or diploma or a university bachelor’s degree from 1986 to 2010 in Canada, based on data from the National Graduates Survey (NGS). Changes in co-op participation rates over time are examined, along with differences by field of study. The reasons behind the increase in co-op participation rates of women are also explored.

    Release date: 2016-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2016011
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides a portrait of international students in Canadian universities between 2004-2005 and 2013-2014, where they were studying in Canada, where they came from and in what fields they were studying.

    Release date: 2016-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2016001
    Description:

    The purpose of this analytical report is to identify the linkages among demographic trends, economic dynamics and literacy skills for New Brunswick francophones. The first part of the report presents the most recent profile of literacy, numeracy and problem-solving skills in a technology-rich environment as it relates to New Brunswick francophones, using the data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). The first step is to assess the skill levels of New Brunswick francophones and to compare them against those of their anglophone counterparts and certain other francophone groups in Canada. The first section also endeavours to illustrate the major trends and specific factors that account for the gaps observed in the case of New Brunswick francophones.

    The second part of the report looks at the major demographic trends that characterize New Brunswick’s francophone population, focusing mainly on population aging, intraprovincial and interprovincial migration trends and the role of international immigration. These major trends are outlined, as are, more importantly, the ways they interact with the level of literacy and numeracy proficiency of the francophone population. The focus in the third part is similar in that it begins by detailing New Brunswick’s labour market and the role of francophones within it. The reciprocal influences among skills, demographic phenomena and the structure of the labour market documented therein shed light on the vicious circle that New Brunswick francophones find themselves in.

    Release date: 2016-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114655
    Description:

    Based on a self-reported measure of overqualification, this article examines the association between overqualification and skills among workers aged 25 to 64 with a university degree, using data from the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). This article also examines the extent to which overqualified workers are dissatisfied with their jobs. Overqualified workers are defined in this study as university-educated workers who reported that they were in a job requiring no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2016-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016380
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their job in many industrialized countries (OECD 2013). Faced with job loss, displaced workers may choose to return to school to help them reintegrate into the labour force. Job losses in a given local labour market may also induce workers who have not yet been laid off to pre-emptively enrol in postsecondary (PS) institutions, as a precautionary measure. Combining microdata and grouped data, this study examines these two dimensions of the relationship between layoffs and PS enrolment over the 2001-to-2011 period.

    Release date: 2016-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114630
    Description:

    This article examines the literacy and numeracy skills of off reserve First Nations and Métis adults aged 25 to 65, focusing on the factors and labour market outcomes associated with higher skill levels. In this study, individuals in the higher range for literacy and numeracy are defined as those who scored level 3 or higher (out of 5 levels) in tests administered by the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016377
    Description:

    It has been well documented that the children of immigrants in Canada outperform their peers with Canadian-born parents in educational attainment, and that the two groups have similar labour market outcomes. However, large variations by ethnicity or source country exist among the children of immigrants. This study examines the extent to which admission class (e.g., skilled workers, business immigrants, live-in caregivers, the family class and refugees) also matters in the socioeconomic outcomes of childhood immigrants who arrived in Canada before the age of 18.

    Release date: 2016-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114464
    Description:

    Using data from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this study examines the gap in the financial knowledge of men and women and how the difference varies across socioeconomic characteristics such as age and education. It also provides additional insight into the financial knowledge of Canadian men and women who are married or in a common-law union.

    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114360
    Description:

    Using data from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this article examines the extent to which individuals in the labour force are preparing for retirement and provides another perspective on the relationship between financial literacy and retirement planning.

    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016056
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents age-adjusted mean earnings by detailed field of study among 25- to 54-year-old university and college graduates who worked full year, full time in 2010. The data are drawn from the 2011 National Household Survey.

    Release date: 2016-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114322
    Description:

    This article explores how skill proficiencies are related to household income for Canadians aged 16 to 65 using data from the first wave of the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA), conducted in 2012. The article also demonstrates how the relationship between skill level and low income changes after controlling for other characteristics known to increase the risk of low income.

    Release date: 2016-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114299
    Description:

    This article provides information about the number and characteristics of international students in Canada, and about their rate of transition into permanent residence. The article also examines the extent to which the transition rate varied across characteristics and cohorts, and whether these variations affected the profile of immigrants who are former international students. It does so by using a new administrative database—the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD).

    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114247
    Description:

    This article examines regional differences in the math and reading skills of immigrant children aged 15 based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). It also examines regional differences in high-school and university completion rates among young immigrants who came to Canada before the age of 15 using National Household Survey (NHS) data. Throughout the article, comparisons are made with the children of the Canadian-born (third- or higher-generation Canadians).

    Release date: 2015-11-18

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Analysis (493)

Analysis (493) (25 of 493 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017395
    Description:

    This study uses large national longitudinal datasets to examine cross-cohort trends and within-cohort changes in earnings among three groups of young university graduates: immigrants who are former international students in Canada (Canadian-educated immigrants), foreign-educated immigrants who had a university degree before immigrating to Canada and the Canadian-born population.

    Release date: 2017-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017393
    Description:

    The increased migration of skilled workers globally has led to a focus in the immigration literature on the economic costs of unsuccessful labour market integration. Less attention has been given to the consequences of employment difficulties, such as those related to over-education, on aspects of immigrants’ subjective well-being. Although a large proportion of immigrants experience over-education, studies examining the relationship between over-education and life satisfaction tend to concentrate on the general population. These studies find a negative relationship between over-education and life satisfaction. Since immigrant and Canadian-born (non-immigrant) workers may experience over-education differently, it is important to examine this relationship in both groups. This study examines how over-education is associated with life satisfaction among university-educated immigrant and non-immigrant workers in Canada, and accounts for differences in the degree of over-education in each group.

    Release date: 2017-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114824
    Description:

    In this paper, multiple sources of data are used to study the profile and labour market outcomes of young men and women aged 25 to 34 without a high school diploma. The data sources include the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) and the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017071
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents the characteristics of families with children under the age of 18 who hold registered education savings plan (RESP) investments. The article also examines the relationship between holding an RESP account at age 15 and postsecondary enrolment between the ages of 19 and 27. The data are drawn from the 1999 and 2012 Survey of Financial Security and from the Youth in Transition Survey, Cohort A, linked to the T1 Family File. Postsecondary enrolment is derived from education deductions and tuition credits in the tax data.

    Release date: 2017-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017392
    Description:

    The registered education savings plan (RESP) savings vehicle is designed to encourage parents of school-age children to save for their children’s postsecondary education through tax sheltered earnings on contributions, as well as through additional contributions from the federal government. No recent evidence exists on the characteristics of RESP holders, and little exists on the association between having an RESP and enrolling in postsecondary education.

    This study makes three contributions to the literature. First, it documents differences in RESP holdings by family income and how these have evolved over time. Second, it decomposes these differences (particularly between the top and bottom quintiles of family income) into portions that are related to differences in key determinants of RESP participation (e.g., family wealth and parental education). And, third, it examines the relationship between having an RESP account and attending a postsecondary institution.

    Release date: 2017-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114798
    Description:

    This study uses a new longitudinal dataset that combines information from the Postsecondary Information System (PSIS) with personal income tax data to examine the labour market outcomes of graduates from universities in the Maritime provinces (Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick). In this pilot study, the outcomes of six cohorts of young people who graduated from a university in the Maritime provinces between 2006 and 2011 are examined, including 37,425 undergraduate degree holders (those with a bachelor’s degree) and 6,740 graduate degree holders (those with a master’s degree or a doctorate).

    Release date: 2017-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017070
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents postsecondary enrolment rates among 19-year-olds over the 2001-to-2014 period by province of parental residence, parental income and sex. The data are drawn from the T1 Family File. Postsecondary enrolment is determined by the tuition, education and textbook credits on the personal income tax files. Parental income refers to the adult-equivalent, after-tax income of parents, expressed in 2014 constant dollars. Youth are grouped by parental income quintiles.

    Release date: 2017-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017391
    Description:

    This paper assesses the extent to which education affects how Canadians save and accumulate wealth for retirement. The paper makes three contributions. First, a descriptive analysis is presented of differences in savings and home values across individuals based on their levels of educational attainment. To this end, new datasets that link survey respondents from the 1991 and 2006 censuses of Canada to their administrative tax records are used. These data provide a unique opportunity to jointly observe education, savings, home values, and a plethora of other factors of relevance. Second, the causal effect of high school completion on savings rates in tax-preferred accounts is estimated, exploiting compulsory schooling reforms in the identification. Third, building on a recent study by Messacar (2015), education is also found to affect how individuals re-optimize their savings rates in response to an automatic change in pension wealth accumulation. The implications of this study’s findings for the “nudge paradigm” in behavioural economics are discussed.

    Release date: 2017-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017388
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between occupational skill requirements and educational attainment (the highest level completed and the field of study). Using the 2011 National Household Survey matched to data from the Occupational Information Network (which contains information on occupational skill requirements), the study uncovers many new findings on the skill requirements of jobs held by Canadians aged 25 to 34 with different educational qualifications.

    Release date: 2017-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114692
    Description:

    This study analyses trends in co-operative education (co-op) participation for graduates with a college certificate or diploma or a university bachelor’s degree from 1986 to 2010 in Canada, based on data from the National Graduates Survey (NGS). Changes in co-op participation rates over time are examined, along with differences by field of study. The reasons behind the increase in co-op participation rates of women are also explored.

    Release date: 2016-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2016011
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides a portrait of international students in Canadian universities between 2004-2005 and 2013-2014, where they were studying in Canada, where they came from and in what fields they were studying.

    Release date: 2016-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2016001
    Description:

    The purpose of this analytical report is to identify the linkages among demographic trends, economic dynamics and literacy skills for New Brunswick francophones. The first part of the report presents the most recent profile of literacy, numeracy and problem-solving skills in a technology-rich environment as it relates to New Brunswick francophones, using the data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). The first step is to assess the skill levels of New Brunswick francophones and to compare them against those of their anglophone counterparts and certain other francophone groups in Canada. The first section also endeavours to illustrate the major trends and specific factors that account for the gaps observed in the case of New Brunswick francophones.

    The second part of the report looks at the major demographic trends that characterize New Brunswick’s francophone population, focusing mainly on population aging, intraprovincial and interprovincial migration trends and the role of international immigration. These major trends are outlined, as are, more importantly, the ways they interact with the level of literacy and numeracy proficiency of the francophone population. The focus in the third part is similar in that it begins by detailing New Brunswick’s labour market and the role of francophones within it. The reciprocal influences among skills, demographic phenomena and the structure of the labour market documented therein shed light on the vicious circle that New Brunswick francophones find themselves in.

    Release date: 2016-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114655
    Description:

    Based on a self-reported measure of overqualification, this article examines the association between overqualification and skills among workers aged 25 to 64 with a university degree, using data from the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). This article also examines the extent to which overqualified workers are dissatisfied with their jobs. Overqualified workers are defined in this study as university-educated workers who reported that they were in a job requiring no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2016-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016380
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their job in many industrialized countries (OECD 2013). Faced with job loss, displaced workers may choose to return to school to help them reintegrate into the labour force. Job losses in a given local labour market may also induce workers who have not yet been laid off to pre-emptively enrol in postsecondary (PS) institutions, as a precautionary measure. Combining microdata and grouped data, this study examines these two dimensions of the relationship between layoffs and PS enrolment over the 2001-to-2011 period.

    Release date: 2016-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114630
    Description:

    This article examines the literacy and numeracy skills of off reserve First Nations and Métis adults aged 25 to 65, focusing on the factors and labour market outcomes associated with higher skill levels. In this study, individuals in the higher range for literacy and numeracy are defined as those who scored level 3 or higher (out of 5 levels) in tests administered by the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016377
    Description:

    It has been well documented that the children of immigrants in Canada outperform their peers with Canadian-born parents in educational attainment, and that the two groups have similar labour market outcomes. However, large variations by ethnicity or source country exist among the children of immigrants. This study examines the extent to which admission class (e.g., skilled workers, business immigrants, live-in caregivers, the family class and refugees) also matters in the socioeconomic outcomes of childhood immigrants who arrived in Canada before the age of 18.

    Release date: 2016-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114464
    Description:

    Using data from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this study examines the gap in the financial knowledge of men and women and how the difference varies across socioeconomic characteristics such as age and education. It also provides additional insight into the financial knowledge of Canadian men and women who are married or in a common-law union.

    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114360
    Description:

    Using data from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this article examines the extent to which individuals in the labour force are preparing for retirement and provides another perspective on the relationship between financial literacy and retirement planning.

    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016056
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents age-adjusted mean earnings by detailed field of study among 25- to 54-year-old university and college graduates who worked full year, full time in 2010. The data are drawn from the 2011 National Household Survey.

    Release date: 2016-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114322
    Description:

    This article explores how skill proficiencies are related to household income for Canadians aged 16 to 65 using data from the first wave of the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA), conducted in 2012. The article also demonstrates how the relationship between skill level and low income changes after controlling for other characteristics known to increase the risk of low income.

    Release date: 2016-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114299
    Description:

    This article provides information about the number and characteristics of international students in Canada, and about their rate of transition into permanent residence. The article also examines the extent to which the transition rate varied across characteristics and cohorts, and whether these variations affected the profile of immigrants who are former international students. It does so by using a new administrative database—the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD).

    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114247
    Description:

    This article examines regional differences in the math and reading skills of immigrant children aged 15 based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). It also examines regional differences in high-school and university completion rates among young immigrants who came to Canada before the age of 15 using National Household Survey (NHS) data. Throughout the article, comparisons are made with the children of the Canadian-born (third- or higher-generation Canadians).

    Release date: 2015-11-18

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