Statistics by subject – Education, training and learning

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (14)

All (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960033174
    Description:

    Canada has become a world leader in hosting international students. Ranked fifth in the world in 1992, Canada was behind only the United States, France, Germany and the United Kingdom in the number of international postsecondary students hosted. At all levels during the 1993-94 school year, approximately 87,000 international students were studying in Canadian universities, colleges and schools. Although their stay in Canada is usually temporary, international students often bring both cultural and financial benefits. Their presence can enrich Canadian campuses by contributing to a culturally and intellectually diverse learning environment. Also, their enrolment may generate additional revenues for educational institutions at a time when education budgets are under severe pressure. The impact of international students often extends beyond their period of study and their ties with Canada can continue long after they return to their countries.

    Release date: 1996-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960033172
    Description:

    The following is a description of the characteristics of Canadian adults who use computers at home and in the workplace and a discussion of the types of computer skills users have developed.

    Release date: 1996-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960033173
    Description:

    Using the data from the University Student Information System (USIS), this article briefly discusses basic national and provincial trends for 1993-94.

    Release date: 1996-10-31

  • Public use microdata: 81M0016X
    Description:

    In the late 1980s, Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) commissioned Statistics Canada to conduct a survey to identify the characteristics and consequences of leaving school. Between April and June 1991, computer assisted telephone interviews (CATI) obtained demographic/background data, information on school experiences and post-school labour market experiences from 9,460 young people aged 18 to 20. The 1991 respondents were classified into one of three groups: continuers (still in high school), graduates (had received a high school certificate or diploma), or leavers (not in high school and did not have a high school certificate or diploma).

    In early 1994, HRDC requested that Statistics Canada re-interview the 1991 survey respondents. The School Leavers Follow-up Survey (SLFS) was conducted between September and December 1995, again using the CATI instrument. The primary objective of the Follow-up was to study the school-work transitions of young people beyond high school, particularly: 1. from the end of high school to the first job and 2. after the first job (i.e. various school-work and work-work transitions).

    Release date: 1996-09-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-551-X
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) was a seven-country initiative conducted in the fall of 1994. Its goal: to create comparable literacy profiles across national, linguistic and cultural boundaries. The results, published in the report Literacy, economy and society: results of the first International Adult Literacy Survey (catalogue no. 89-545-XPE) demonstrated a strong plausible link between literacy and a country's economic potential. This Canadian report expands and extends the analysis of the Canadian data presented in the international report, including additional data on the distribution of literacy by region and language.

    Release date: 1996-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0094X
    Description:

    The Backgrounder on the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) describes the history of the survey and how literacy is measured.

    Release date: 1996-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19960012823
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's 1991 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) was used to examine the prevalence and severity of disability and the degree of dependence in the Aboriginal population. Where possible, these results are compared with data for the total Canadian household population from the 1991 Health and Activity Limitation Survey (HALS).

    Release date: 1996-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022887
    Description:

    This article, also based on the IALS, compares the literacy levels of workers aged 16 to 65 in Canada, the United States and Germany. Of particular interest are the low scores achieved by a significant minority of Canadian workers. As expected, a relationship exists between literacy skills, occupation and industry.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022886
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) measured the variation in basic literacy skills of adults in seven industrialized nations. This note outlines the aims and methodology of the landmark study and provides a snapshot of results for people in Canada, the United States and Germany.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950042816
    Description:

    According to the 1994-95 National Population Health Survey, close to 6% of Canadians aged 18 and over had experienced a major depressive episode in the previous 12 months. Univariate analysis shows that the prevalence of depression was higher among women than among men, but tended to decline at older ages for both sexes. The prevalence of depression was also related to a number of socioeconomic characteristics such as marital status, education, and household income, and to several measures of stress, psychological resources and social support. However, multivariate analysis shows that not all of these variables were significantly associated with the odds of experiencing depression. In some instances, factors that increased the risk differed for men and women. For both sexes, chronic strain, recent negative events, lack of closeness, and low self-esteem increased the odds of depression. Traumatic events in childhood or young adulthood and a low sense of mastery were associated with a higher risk of depression for women, but not men. For men, being single and having moderate self-esteem heightened the risk of depression. A substantial proportion of both men and women who had suffered depression reported using drugs. As well, a notable share of people who had been depressed sought professional health care for emotional or mental problems.

    Release date: 1996-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950042818
    Description:

    The healthy immigrant effect observed in other countries also prevails in Canada. Immigrants, especially recent immigrants, are less likely than the Canadian-born population to have chronic conditions or disabilities. The effect is most evident among those from non-European countries, who constitute the majority of recent immigrants to Canada. This article compares the health status, health care utilization, and health-related behaviour of immigrants with the Canadian-born population, and is based on self-reported data from the 1994-95 National Population Health Survey. Health status is examined in terms of chronic conditions, disability and health-related dependency. The indicators of health care utilization are hospitalization, contact with physicians and dentists, unmet needs for health services. The health- related and behaviours analysed are smoking and leisure time physical activity.

    Release date: 1996-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950042817
    Description:

    The sense of coherence a healthy outlook can be thought of as a mesure of positive health, that is, a factor promoting resilience which enables and individual to remain healthy. Based on National Population Health Survey (NPHS) data, three health measures were analyzed in relation to sense of coherence. The sense of coherence accounted for a substancial proportion of the total variance for two of the three measures. Theoretically, people with a healthy outlook are more able to cope successfully with trauma and stress. According to NPHS data, on average, those who reported at least one traumatic event had a lower sense of coherence than those who did not. For people who experienced trauma during childhood and young adulthood, yet had strong sense of coherence, the impact of that trauma on their health was diminished.

    Release date: 1996-04-02

  • Table: 10F0008X
    Description:

    Two sets of profiles are available; the first (2A) presents the basic data collected from all Canadian households; the second (2B) presents the detailed socio-economic data collected from a 20% sample of households.

    Release date: 1996-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960012525
    Description:

    Who are they? Where do they work? And how do their earnings compare with those of men in similar circumstances? This article looks at the growth in entrepreneurship among women, and compares their characteristics with those of their male counterparts.

    Release date: 1996-03-12

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Public use microdata: 81M0016X
    Description:

    In the late 1980s, Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) commissioned Statistics Canada to conduct a survey to identify the characteristics and consequences of leaving school. Between April and June 1991, computer assisted telephone interviews (CATI) obtained demographic/background data, information on school experiences and post-school labour market experiences from 9,460 young people aged 18 to 20. The 1991 respondents were classified into one of three groups: continuers (still in high school), graduates (had received a high school certificate or diploma), or leavers (not in high school and did not have a high school certificate or diploma).

    In early 1994, HRDC requested that Statistics Canada re-interview the 1991 survey respondents. The School Leavers Follow-up Survey (SLFS) was conducted between September and December 1995, again using the CATI instrument. The primary objective of the Follow-up was to study the school-work transitions of young people beyond high school, particularly: 1. from the end of high school to the first job and 2. after the first job (i.e. various school-work and work-work transitions).

    Release date: 1996-09-30

  • Table: 10F0008X
    Description:

    Two sets of profiles are available; the first (2A) presents the basic data collected from all Canadian households; the second (2B) presents the detailed socio-economic data collected from a 20% sample of households.

    Release date: 1996-04-01

Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960033174
    Description:

    Canada has become a world leader in hosting international students. Ranked fifth in the world in 1992, Canada was behind only the United States, France, Germany and the United Kingdom in the number of international postsecondary students hosted. At all levels during the 1993-94 school year, approximately 87,000 international students were studying in Canadian universities, colleges and schools. Although their stay in Canada is usually temporary, international students often bring both cultural and financial benefits. Their presence can enrich Canadian campuses by contributing to a culturally and intellectually diverse learning environment. Also, their enrolment may generate additional revenues for educational institutions at a time when education budgets are under severe pressure. The impact of international students often extends beyond their period of study and their ties with Canada can continue long after they return to their countries.

    Release date: 1996-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960033172
    Description:

    The following is a description of the characteristics of Canadian adults who use computers at home and in the workplace and a discussion of the types of computer skills users have developed.

    Release date: 1996-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960033173
    Description:

    Using the data from the University Student Information System (USIS), this article briefly discusses basic national and provincial trends for 1993-94.

    Release date: 1996-10-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-551-X
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) was a seven-country initiative conducted in the fall of 1994. Its goal: to create comparable literacy profiles across national, linguistic and cultural boundaries. The results, published in the report Literacy, economy and society: results of the first International Adult Literacy Survey (catalogue no. 89-545-XPE) demonstrated a strong plausible link between literacy and a country's economic potential. This Canadian report expands and extends the analysis of the Canadian data presented in the international report, including additional data on the distribution of literacy by region and language.

    Release date: 1996-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19960012823
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's 1991 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) was used to examine the prevalence and severity of disability and the degree of dependence in the Aboriginal population. Where possible, these results are compared with data for the total Canadian household population from the 1991 Health and Activity Limitation Survey (HALS).

    Release date: 1996-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022887
    Description:

    This article, also based on the IALS, compares the literacy levels of workers aged 16 to 65 in Canada, the United States and Germany. Of particular interest are the low scores achieved by a significant minority of Canadian workers. As expected, a relationship exists between literacy skills, occupation and industry.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022886
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) measured the variation in basic literacy skills of adults in seven industrialized nations. This note outlines the aims and methodology of the landmark study and provides a snapshot of results for people in Canada, the United States and Germany.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950042816
    Description:

    According to the 1994-95 National Population Health Survey, close to 6% of Canadians aged 18 and over had experienced a major depressive episode in the previous 12 months. Univariate analysis shows that the prevalence of depression was higher among women than among men, but tended to decline at older ages for both sexes. The prevalence of depression was also related to a number of socioeconomic characteristics such as marital status, education, and household income, and to several measures of stress, psychological resources and social support. However, multivariate analysis shows that not all of these variables were significantly associated with the odds of experiencing depression. In some instances, factors that increased the risk differed for men and women. For both sexes, chronic strain, recent negative events, lack of closeness, and low self-esteem increased the odds of depression. Traumatic events in childhood or young adulthood and a low sense of mastery were associated with a higher risk of depression for women, but not men. For men, being single and having moderate self-esteem heightened the risk of depression. A substantial proportion of both men and women who had suffered depression reported using drugs. As well, a notable share of people who had been depressed sought professional health care for emotional or mental problems.

    Release date: 1996-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950042818
    Description:

    The healthy immigrant effect observed in other countries also prevails in Canada. Immigrants, especially recent immigrants, are less likely than the Canadian-born population to have chronic conditions or disabilities. The effect is most evident among those from non-European countries, who constitute the majority of recent immigrants to Canada. This article compares the health status, health care utilization, and health-related behaviour of immigrants with the Canadian-born population, and is based on self-reported data from the 1994-95 National Population Health Survey. Health status is examined in terms of chronic conditions, disability and health-related dependency. The indicators of health care utilization are hospitalization, contact with physicians and dentists, unmet needs for health services. The health- related and behaviours analysed are smoking and leisure time physical activity.

    Release date: 1996-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950042817
    Description:

    The sense of coherence a healthy outlook can be thought of as a mesure of positive health, that is, a factor promoting resilience which enables and individual to remain healthy. Based on National Population Health Survey (NPHS) data, three health measures were analyzed in relation to sense of coherence. The sense of coherence accounted for a substancial proportion of the total variance for two of the three measures. Theoretically, people with a healthy outlook are more able to cope successfully with trauma and stress. According to NPHS data, on average, those who reported at least one traumatic event had a lower sense of coherence than those who did not. For people who experienced trauma during childhood and young adulthood, yet had strong sense of coherence, the impact of that trauma on their health was diminished.

    Release date: 1996-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960012525
    Description:

    Who are they? Where do they work? And how do their earnings compare with those of men in similar circumstances? This article looks at the growth in entrepreneurship among women, and compares their characteristics with those of their male counterparts.

    Release date: 1996-03-12

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: