Statistics by subject – Education, training and learning

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (28)

All (28) (25 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999137
    Description:

    This paper describes the evidence that several Statistics Canada studies have developed on the importance of innovation to growth and the need for highly skilled workers in the innovation process. Rather than focusing on broad industry aggregates as is often done, we concentrate our attention on firms and their behaviour. This allows us to investigate the connection between the success of businesses and the strategies that they pursue.

    We find that the more successful firms attribute their success to having developed competencies in a wide range of areas-but that the common factor that most frequently distinguishes faster from slower growing firms is innovation. Innovators in turn place greater emphasis on training and acquiring skilled workers.

    The studies also show that the emphasis on highly skilled workers varies across industries. In goods industries, a training strategy complements an innovation strategy that focuses on R&D, the adoption of new advanced technologies, or the development of new processes. Small firms that are innovative train their workers when they introduce new machinery and equipment. In the service sector, the innovation strategy relies less on new capital and more on new skills embodied in the workforce. Here there is evidence that a training strategy, by itself, has more impact on the success of a firm-probably because it is more likely to be the innovation strategy of the firm.

    Release date: 1999-11-30

  • Public use microdata: 89M0018X
    Description:

    This is a CD-ROM product from the Ontario Adult Literacy Survey (OALS), conducted in the spring of 1998 with the goal of providing information on: the ability of Ontario immigrants to use either English or French in their daily activities; and on their self-perceived literacy skills, training needs and barriers to training.

    In order to cover the majority of Ontario immigrants, the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) of Toronto, Hamilton, Ottawa, Kitchener, London and St. Catharines were included in the sample. With these 6 CMAs, about 83% of Ontario immigrants were included in the sample frame. This sample of 7,107 dwellings covered the population of Ontario immigrants in general as well as specifically targetting immigrants with a mother tongue of Italian, Chinese, Portuguese, Polish, and Spanish and immigrants born in the Caribbean Islands with a mother tongue of English.

    Each interview was approximately 1.5 hours in duration and consisted of a half-hour questionnaire, asking demographic and literacy-related questions as well as a one-hour literacy test. This literacy test was derived from that used in the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) and covered the domains of document and quantitative literacy. An overall response rate to the survey of 76% was achieved, resulting in 4,648 respondents.

    Release date: 1999-10-29

  • Classification: 89F0077X199903B
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is the first Canada-wide survey of children. Starting in 1994, it will gather information on a sample of children and their life experiences. It will follow these children over time. The survey will collect information on children and their families, education, health, development, behaviour, friends, activities, etc.

    Along with 89F0077XPE (or XIE) issue 9903a, this document contains the various questionnaires used to gather information from parents, children, teachers and principals.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19980015024
    Description:

    A longitudinal study on a cohort of pupils in the secondary school has been conducted in an Italian region since 1986 in order to study the transition from school to working life. The information have been collected at every sweep by a mail questionnaire and, at the final sweep, by a face-to-face interview, where retrospective questions referring back to the whole observation period have been asked. The gross flows between different discrete states - still in the school system, in the labour force without a job, in the labour force with a job - may then be estimated both from prospective and retrospective data, and the recall effect may be evaluated. Moreover, the conditions observed by the two different techniques may be regarded as two indicators of the 'true' unobservable condition, thus leading to the specification and estimation of a latent class model. In this framework, a Markov chain hypothesis may be introduced and evaluated in order to estimate the transition probabilities between the states, once they are corrected or the classification errors. Since the information collected by mail show a given amount of missing data in terms of unit nonresponse, the 'missing' category is also introduced in the model specification.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19980015034
    Description:

    A model of secondary school progression has been estimated using data from the 1991 School Leavers Survey conducted by Statistics Canada. The data on which the school progression model was based comprised current educational status and responses to retrospective questions on the timing of schooling events. These data were sufficient for approximate reconstruction of educational event histories of each respondent. The school progression model was designed to be included in a larger, continuous time micro-simulation model. Its main features involve estimation -- by age, month of birth and season for both sexes in each province -- of rates of graduation, of dropout, of return and of dropout graduation. Estimation was reinforced with auxiliary 1991 Census and administative data.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0116X
    Description:

    These highlights provide a brief summary of the report "Inequalities in literacy skills among youth in Canada and the United States", the latest monograph released using data from the International Adult Literacy Survey. This report suggests that youth in North America do not fare as well in their literacy skills as their European counterparts. Variables such as income and education continue to have direct and indirect effects on people's literacy skills.

    Release date: 1999-10-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0117X
    Description:

    This report outlines some initial results from the School Component of the first and second cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). It examines the longitudinal influence of Early Childhood Care and Education and literacy activities on young children's future academic and cognitive outcomes. This overview highlights the information newly available from this component of the survey; it is not comprehensive in its coverage or its analysis. Indeed, the information collected by the NLSCY is so rich and detailed that researchers and analysts will be using it to address a variety of important questions concerning the education of children and youth in Canada for many years to come. Here then, we are merely scratching the surface to stimulate awareness of this rich new data source, and to illustrate the kinds of analyses it makes possible.

    Release date: 1999-10-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014699
    Description:

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this article analyses the effects of family relationship processes and family member characteristics on the school achievement of boys and girls aged 6 to 11 years.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014698
    Description:

    This paper presents the results and recommendations of UNESCO's International Commission on Education for the 21st Century. It was presented at the Third National Forum on Education in St. John's, Newfoundland in May 1998.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014700
    Description:

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this article studies the links between academic achievement, children's views of themselves, and adults' support during the transition to early adolescence.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014701
    Description:

    This article examines the influences of neighbourhood and family socio-economic characteristics on children's readiness to start school. It uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M1999006
    Description:

    This study examines the general finding that Canadian youth from higher socio-economic backgrounds tend to perform better on the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) than do youth from disadvantaged backgrounds. It also looks at whether this applies to states within the United States.

    Release date: 1999-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024659
    Description:

    This article looks at university graduates with bachelor's degrees who entered a college program within two years of graduating.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034685
    Description:

    Considerable attention has been paid in recent years to self-employment in Canada, especially to workers' reasons for choosing this option. Have they been "pushed" by lack of full-time paid jobs or "pulled" by the positive benefits of self-employment? This article looks at the characteristics of the self-employed and the growth of self-employment in Canada and the United States.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-587-X
    Description:

    This report presents results from the Survey of 1995 Graduates Who Moved to the United States. Both the survey and this report were conducted in partnership between Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) and Statistics Canada. The survey covered post-secondary graduates from the class of '95 who moved to the U.S. between graduation and the summer of 1997. These graduates were surveyed to obtain information on their characteristics, reasons for relocating to the U.S., education and work experiences, and plans for the future.

    This report is also available on HRDC's web site at: www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/arb. Additional reports on the experience of post-secondary graduates are also available on the same web site.

    Release date: 1999-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980044653
    Description:

    This paper is a joint project of Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada which uses data from the Canada Sudent Loans Program administrative data system to examine general patterns of Canada Student Loan debt in the 1990-91 to 1995-96 time frame for all full-time students, as well as specific trends in student debt by type of educational institution attended. It does not examine loans received through provincial programs. First, we look at the number of students with Canada Student Loans who entered into repayment and the average values of their loans in 1995 constant dollars. We then go on to analyse trends in loan activity and replayment patterns, including repayment difficulties, loan defaults and bankruptcies, and early repayment in full.

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980044654
    Description:

    The analysis of NLSCY school data presented in this article begins by exploring principals' evaluations of the adequacy of their schools' resources. Next, the presence, activity and influence of school advisory committees are examined. Following this, the article looks at the levels of regular staff and special resource staff are considered. The paper ends by describing a few features associated with students attending NLSCY schools.

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980044655
    Description:

    This article offers one definition on parental involvement and reviews a number of questions asked about elementary school children (aged 4 - 11) in the first cycle of the NLSCY (1994 -95).

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111318
    Description:

    This section is in three main parts as follows: Summary Statistics (series W1-66); Elementary and Secondary Education (series W67-306) and Post-secondary Education (series W307-532). Within each part there are series on enrolment, number and qualifications of teachers and financial data. Additional information on degrees awarded and libraries is given in the third part.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014629
    Description:

    The growth of the Canadian economy depends largely on scientific and technological innovation in its knowledge-based industries. Research and development in the aerospace, environmental technology, information technology, biotechnology and telecommunications industries requires a highly qualified labour force with the right skills. A new paper reveals how well we're doing matching skills to demand.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024604
    Description:

    Previous studies of the job skills gap have focused on the problem of workers with literacy deficits. Yet, in terms of the costs to individuals, firms and the national economy, literacy surplus (or underemployment) is equally important. This article examines the "fit" or "mismatch" between job requirements and workers' literacy skills, profiling patterns of literacy use and under-use in the labour market. (Adapted from a report published by Statistics Canada and Human Resources Development Canada.)

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014576
    Description:

    This article looks at methods used in finding a job after graduation and the criteria for choosing a job.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980034470
    Description:

    In today's changing economy, government, policy organizations, and members of the business community all emphasize the importance of knowledge, skills and lifelong learning for individuals to succeed in the labour market and for the economy to grow. Postsecondary education has been targeted as one of the key vehicles for producing a labour force ready to meet the challenge of the new workplace.

    Release date: 1999-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980034472
    Release date: 1999-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999131
    Description:

    Using a regression decomposition approach, we find that, during the 1980s, the growth in the relative educational attainment of older workers has contributed to about one-quarter of the increase in the age-wage gap of men and women. During the 1990s, the age-wage gap increased to a much lesser extent. Changing relative educational attainment accounted for a much greater proportion of the much smaller increase in the gap: almost one-half for males and over three-quarters for women. We also find that, during the 1980s, the expected weekly wages associated with all levels of education fell for younger workers, both for men and women (from 2% to 16%, depending upon education level). Older employees, on the other hand, experienced mixed results. Expected weekly wages rose for some older workers and fell for some others.

    Release date: 1999-03-22

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Public use microdata: 89M0018X
    Description:

    This is a CD-ROM product from the Ontario Adult Literacy Survey (OALS), conducted in the spring of 1998 with the goal of providing information on: the ability of Ontario immigrants to use either English or French in their daily activities; and on their self-perceived literacy skills, training needs and barriers to training.

    In order to cover the majority of Ontario immigrants, the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) of Toronto, Hamilton, Ottawa, Kitchener, London and St. Catharines were included in the sample. With these 6 CMAs, about 83% of Ontario immigrants were included in the sample frame. This sample of 7,107 dwellings covered the population of Ontario immigrants in general as well as specifically targetting immigrants with a mother tongue of Italian, Chinese, Portuguese, Polish, and Spanish and immigrants born in the Caribbean Islands with a mother tongue of English.

    Each interview was approximately 1.5 hours in duration and consisted of a half-hour questionnaire, asking demographic and literacy-related questions as well as a one-hour literacy test. This literacy test was derived from that used in the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) and covered the domains of document and quantitative literacy. An overall response rate to the survey of 76% was achieved, resulting in 4,648 respondents.

    Release date: 1999-10-29

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111318
    Description:

    This section is in three main parts as follows: Summary Statistics (series W1-66); Elementary and Secondary Education (series W67-306) and Post-secondary Education (series W307-532). Within each part there are series on enrolment, number and qualifications of teachers and financial data. Additional information on degrees awarded and libraries is given in the third part.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

Analysis (23)

Analysis (23) (23 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999137
    Description:

    This paper describes the evidence that several Statistics Canada studies have developed on the importance of innovation to growth and the need for highly skilled workers in the innovation process. Rather than focusing on broad industry aggregates as is often done, we concentrate our attention on firms and their behaviour. This allows us to investigate the connection between the success of businesses and the strategies that they pursue.

    We find that the more successful firms attribute their success to having developed competencies in a wide range of areas-but that the common factor that most frequently distinguishes faster from slower growing firms is innovation. Innovators in turn place greater emphasis on training and acquiring skilled workers.

    The studies also show that the emphasis on highly skilled workers varies across industries. In goods industries, a training strategy complements an innovation strategy that focuses on R&D, the adoption of new advanced technologies, or the development of new processes. Small firms that are innovative train their workers when they introduce new machinery and equipment. In the service sector, the innovation strategy relies less on new capital and more on new skills embodied in the workforce. Here there is evidence that a training strategy, by itself, has more impact on the success of a firm-probably because it is more likely to be the innovation strategy of the firm.

    Release date: 1999-11-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0116X
    Description:

    These highlights provide a brief summary of the report "Inequalities in literacy skills among youth in Canada and the United States", the latest monograph released using data from the International Adult Literacy Survey. This report suggests that youth in North America do not fare as well in their literacy skills as their European counterparts. Variables such as income and education continue to have direct and indirect effects on people's literacy skills.

    Release date: 1999-10-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0117X
    Description:

    This report outlines some initial results from the School Component of the first and second cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). It examines the longitudinal influence of Early Childhood Care and Education and literacy activities on young children's future academic and cognitive outcomes. This overview highlights the information newly available from this component of the survey; it is not comprehensive in its coverage or its analysis. Indeed, the information collected by the NLSCY is so rich and detailed that researchers and analysts will be using it to address a variety of important questions concerning the education of children and youth in Canada for many years to come. Here then, we are merely scratching the surface to stimulate awareness of this rich new data source, and to illustrate the kinds of analyses it makes possible.

    Release date: 1999-10-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014699
    Description:

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this article analyses the effects of family relationship processes and family member characteristics on the school achievement of boys and girls aged 6 to 11 years.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014698
    Description:

    This paper presents the results and recommendations of UNESCO's International Commission on Education for the 21st Century. It was presented at the Third National Forum on Education in St. John's, Newfoundland in May 1998.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014700
    Description:

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this article studies the links between academic achievement, children's views of themselves, and adults' support during the transition to early adolescence.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014701
    Description:

    This article examines the influences of neighbourhood and family socio-economic characteristics on children's readiness to start school. It uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M1999006
    Description:

    This study examines the general finding that Canadian youth from higher socio-economic backgrounds tend to perform better on the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) than do youth from disadvantaged backgrounds. It also looks at whether this applies to states within the United States.

    Release date: 1999-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024659
    Description:

    This article looks at university graduates with bachelor's degrees who entered a college program within two years of graduating.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034685
    Description:

    Considerable attention has been paid in recent years to self-employment in Canada, especially to workers' reasons for choosing this option. Have they been "pushed" by lack of full-time paid jobs or "pulled" by the positive benefits of self-employment? This article looks at the characteristics of the self-employed and the growth of self-employment in Canada and the United States.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-587-X
    Description:

    This report presents results from the Survey of 1995 Graduates Who Moved to the United States. Both the survey and this report were conducted in partnership between Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) and Statistics Canada. The survey covered post-secondary graduates from the class of '95 who moved to the U.S. between graduation and the summer of 1997. These graduates were surveyed to obtain information on their characteristics, reasons for relocating to the U.S., education and work experiences, and plans for the future.

    This report is also available on HRDC's web site at: www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/arb. Additional reports on the experience of post-secondary graduates are also available on the same web site.

    Release date: 1999-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980044653
    Description:

    This paper is a joint project of Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada which uses data from the Canada Sudent Loans Program administrative data system to examine general patterns of Canada Student Loan debt in the 1990-91 to 1995-96 time frame for all full-time students, as well as specific trends in student debt by type of educational institution attended. It does not examine loans received through provincial programs. First, we look at the number of students with Canada Student Loans who entered into repayment and the average values of their loans in 1995 constant dollars. We then go on to analyse trends in loan activity and replayment patterns, including repayment difficulties, loan defaults and bankruptcies, and early repayment in full.

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980044654
    Description:

    The analysis of NLSCY school data presented in this article begins by exploring principals' evaluations of the adequacy of their schools' resources. Next, the presence, activity and influence of school advisory committees are examined. Following this, the article looks at the levels of regular staff and special resource staff are considered. The paper ends by describing a few features associated with students attending NLSCY schools.

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980044655
    Description:

    This article offers one definition on parental involvement and reviews a number of questions asked about elementary school children (aged 4 - 11) in the first cycle of the NLSCY (1994 -95).

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014629
    Description:

    The growth of the Canadian economy depends largely on scientific and technological innovation in its knowledge-based industries. Research and development in the aerospace, environmental technology, information technology, biotechnology and telecommunications industries requires a highly qualified labour force with the right skills. A new paper reveals how well we're doing matching skills to demand.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990024604
    Description:

    Previous studies of the job skills gap have focused on the problem of workers with literacy deficits. Yet, in terms of the costs to individuals, firms and the national economy, literacy surplus (or underemployment) is equally important. This article examines the "fit" or "mismatch" between job requirements and workers' literacy skills, profiling patterns of literacy use and under-use in the labour market. (Adapted from a report published by Statistics Canada and Human Resources Development Canada.)

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014576
    Description:

    This article looks at methods used in finding a job after graduation and the criteria for choosing a job.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980034470
    Description:

    In today's changing economy, government, policy organizations, and members of the business community all emphasize the importance of knowledge, skills and lifelong learning for individuals to succeed in the labour market and for the economy to grow. Postsecondary education has been targeted as one of the key vehicles for producing a labour force ready to meet the challenge of the new workplace.

    Release date: 1999-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980034472
    Release date: 1999-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999131
    Description:

    Using a regression decomposition approach, we find that, during the 1980s, the growth in the relative educational attainment of older workers has contributed to about one-quarter of the increase in the age-wage gap of men and women. During the 1990s, the age-wage gap increased to a much lesser extent. Changing relative educational attainment accounted for a much greater proportion of the much smaller increase in the gap: almost one-half for males and over three-quarters for women. We also find that, during the 1980s, the expected weekly wages associated with all levels of education fell for younger workers, both for men and women (from 2% to 16%, depending upon education level). Older employees, on the other hand, experienced mixed results. Expected weekly wages rose for some older workers and fell for some others.

    Release date: 1999-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044418
    Description:

    This article examines the educational achievements for young Aboriginal men and women.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990014410
    Description:

    As students are increasingly pressured to find new ways of funding their education, many turn to student loan programs for assistance, and, as a result, are faced with a post-graduation debt load. Using data from the National Graduates Survey, this study assesses the debt and repayment record for holders of college certificates and diplomas, and bachelor's degrees. It also examines the effect of high debt on these graduates. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Social Trends published in Winter 1998.)

    Release date: 1999-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990014411
    Description:

    Both police officers and private security personnel play a key role in society; however, the line between the two professions is becoming less clearly defined as the use of private security increases. This article discusses the differences between public and private security. It includes information on roles and responsibilities, as well as minimum requirements and training. (Adapted from an article in Juristat published in November 1998.)

    Release date: 1999-03-03

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

  • Classification: 89F0077X199903B
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is the first Canada-wide survey of children. Starting in 1994, it will gather information on a sample of children and their life experiences. It will follow these children over time. The survey will collect information on children and their families, education, health, development, behaviour, friends, activities, etc.

    Along with 89F0077XPE (or XIE) issue 9903a, this document contains the various questionnaires used to gather information from parents, children, teachers and principals.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19980015024
    Description:

    A longitudinal study on a cohort of pupils in the secondary school has been conducted in an Italian region since 1986 in order to study the transition from school to working life. The information have been collected at every sweep by a mail questionnaire and, at the final sweep, by a face-to-face interview, where retrospective questions referring back to the whole observation period have been asked. The gross flows between different discrete states - still in the school system, in the labour force without a job, in the labour force with a job - may then be estimated both from prospective and retrospective data, and the recall effect may be evaluated. Moreover, the conditions observed by the two different techniques may be regarded as two indicators of the 'true' unobservable condition, thus leading to the specification and estimation of a latent class model. In this framework, a Markov chain hypothesis may be introduced and evaluated in order to estimate the transition probabilities between the states, once they are corrected or the classification errors. Since the information collected by mail show a given amount of missing data in terms of unit nonresponse, the 'missing' category is also introduced in the model specification.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19980015034
    Description:

    A model of secondary school progression has been estimated using data from the 1991 School Leavers Survey conducted by Statistics Canada. The data on which the school progression model was based comprised current educational status and responses to retrospective questions on the timing of schooling events. These data were sufficient for approximate reconstruction of educational event histories of each respondent. The school progression model was designed to be included in a larger, continuous time micro-simulation model. Its main features involve estimation -- by age, month of birth and season for both sexes in each province -- of rates of graduation, of dropout, of return and of dropout graduation. Estimation was reinforced with auxiliary 1991 Census and administative data.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: