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All (23) (23 of 23 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-573-X
    Description:

    The international Adult Literacy Survey of 1994 is an important source of information about the literacy levels of Canadians as well as the factors that can explain the disparities between certain sub-populations. The current study shows and tries to explain some of the disparities between Francophones and Anglophones in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000123
    Description:

    Recent studies have demonstrated the quantitative importance of entry, exit, growth and decline in the industrial population. It is this turnover that rewards innovative activity and contributes to productivity growth.

    While the size of the entry population is impressive - especially when cumulated over time - the importance of entry is ultimately due to its impact on innovation in the economy. Experimentation is important in a dynamic, market-based economy. A key part of the experimentation comes from entrants. New entrepreneurs constantly offer consumers new products both in terms of the basic good and the level of service that accompanies it.

    This experimentation is associated with significant costs since many entrants fail. Young firms are most at risk of failure; data drawn from a longitudinal file of Canadian entrants in both the goods and service sectors show that over half the new firms that fail do so in the first two years of life. Life is short for the majority of entrants. Only 1 in 5 new firms survive to their tenth birthday.

    Since so many entrants fall by the wayside, it is of inherent interest to understand the conditions that are associated with success, the conditions that allow the potential in new entrepreneurs to come to fruition. The success of an entrant is due to its choosing the correct combination of strategies and activities. To understand how these capabilities contribute to growth, it is necessary to study how the performance of entrants relates to differences in strategies and pursued activities.

    This paper describes the environment and the characteristics of entrants that manage to survive and grow. In doing so, it focuses on two issues. The first is the innovativeness of entrants and the extent to which their growth depends on their innovativeness. The second is to outline how the stress on worker skills, which is partially related to training, complements innovation and contributes to growth.

    Release date: 2000-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000141
    Description:

    Using three waves (1982, 1986, 1990) of the National Graduate Survey (NGS) we analyze the time it takes graduates of Canadian universities to start a full time job that lasts six months or more. We analyze duration to first job using the Cox proportional hazards model. Our results suggest large differences in the speed of the transition to work both within and between cohorts. They also suggest that the differences in duration to first job across NGS cohorts are not just driven by differences in business cycle conditions at the time of graduation. Over certain segments of duration the patterns of job-starting are similar across cohorts. Within cohorts the differences in the school-to-work transition across certain demographic groups are small, and for some the differences remain stable across cohorts.

    Release date: 2000-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000015409
    Description:

    This article examines whether the education levels of graduates surpass the needs of employers, and to what extent.

    Release date: 2000-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000015410
    Description:

    This article provides an analysis of the employment and earnings patterns of recent postsecondary graduates, based on three waves of the National Graduates Surveys.

    Release date: 2000-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990045144
    Description:

    This article explores the effects of increasing costs on university attendance and the subsequent labour market outcomes of graduates.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990045143
    Description:

    This article explores regional differences among students who drop out of Canadian universities and community colleges.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990045145
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of young people who responded to the 1991 School Leavers Survey (SLS), but who subsequently failed to respond to the 1995 School Leavers Follow-up Survey (SLF).

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Technical products: 89F0120X
    Description:

    Direct measures of skill attainment such as the International Adult Literacy Survey are used to assess the importance of educational outcome skills such as literacy in determining labour market outcomes such as earnings. Policy makers also use them to direct resources most efficiently. However, these skill measures are the product of complex statistical procedures. This paper examines the mathematical robustness of the International Adult Literacy Survey measures against other possibilities in estimating the impact of literacy on individual earnings.

    Release date: 2000-06-02

  • Public use microdata: 81M0009X
    Description:

    The Adult Education Survey (1984) measured the extent to which adult Canadians participated in courses to improve job skills, upgrade academic qualifications, for personal development or for recreation and leisure. The main objectives of the survey were: to measure the incidence of adult education/training in Canada; to provide a socio/economic/demographic profile of individuals who participate and do not participate in education/training.

    Release date: 2000-06-02

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2000007
    Description:

    This paper addresses the problem of statistical inference with ordinal variates and examines the robustness to alternative literacy measurement and scaling choices of rankings of average literacy and of estimates of the impact of literacy on individual earnings.

    Release date: 2000-06-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000025126
    Description:

    To understand the relationship between S&T skills and the labour market Statistics Canada has produced a study that provides insight into where S&T skills are deployed. As a group, the number of persons with S&T degrees, pegged at 5 million in 1996, has been growing five times faster than the number of non S&T degree holders. The highest concentrations of S&T graduates are in health (52.0% have S&T degrees), business services (38.1%), and construction (34.3%).

    Release date: 2000-06-01

  • Index and guides: 98-187-X
    Description:

    Censuses of Canada, 1665 to 1871, Statistics of Canada, Volume IV was printed in Ottawa, in 1876, from the Censuses of Canada, 1870-71. This volume contains about 343 statistical tables on the social and economic conditions in Canada from the earliest settlements to Confederation and onto 1871. The results from 98 censuses are arranged in chronological order, with some explanatory notes. In most cases, there are sufficient descriptions of the individual series to enable the reader to use them without consulting the numerous basic sources referenced in the publication.

    An electronic version of this historical publication is accessible on the Internet site of Statistics Canada. The Introduction is a free downloadable document in text as HTML pages for on-line viewing and Adobe Acrobat (PDF) files for printing. The statistical tables are available through E-STAT* (which allows both on-line viewing and downloading).

    Release date: 2000-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990035008
    Description:

    This paper examines available empirical evidence about the loss of knowledge workers from Canada to the United States (brain drain) and the gain of knowledge workers in Canada from the rest of the world (brain gain).

    Release date: 2000-05-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000146
    Description:

    In this paper, we investigate the extent to which Canadians were exposed to low income during the 1993-1996 period. Our main findings are the following. First, while 1 in 10 Canadians live in families with low income in a given year, as many as 1 in 5 are exposed to at least one year of low income during a 4-year interval. Second, 1 in 20 Canadians are exposed to low income for 4 consecutive years. Third, 40% to 60% of individuals who fall into low income in a given year will no longer have low income the following year. Fourth, some spells of low income last a long time: of all spells started in 1994, 30% lasted 3 years or more. Fifth, Canadians who are the most susceptible to low income tend to be young; to have little education; to be students and to live as unattached individuals or in lone-parent families. As well, Canadians facing disabilities that entail work limitations, those who are members of visible minorities (when considering the exposure to 4 years of low income) or who have immigrated in or after 1977 tend to experience low income. Sixth, high probabilities of being exposed to low income do not necessarily imply high income gaps, that is, the average income of those in low income may be quite close to the low income cut-off. As a result, a complete understanding of the extent to which Canadians are exposed to low income requires an analysis of both the probabilities of being exposed and the income gaps while being exposed.

    Release date: 2000-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000014889
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article compares school and work activities, as well as the unemployment and part-time employment rates, of students and non-students. (Adapted from the Autumn 1999 issue of Labour Force.)

    Release date: 2000-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024899
    Description:

    This article explores the role of parents in the learning environment of children aged 6 to 11 years, using results from the first cycle of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024897
    Description:

    This article focusses on children who receive special education because of a physical, emotional, behavioural or other problem. It uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024898
    Description:

    This article explores children's academic achievement, behaviour, classroom environment and other school-related experiences, using the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024900
    Description:

    This article explores the effects of early childhood education and care programs on school performance and experiences.

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990025344
    Description:

    A Statistics Canada study uses business demographics to learn about innovation and technological change and uncovers interesting patterns. Contrary to expectations, the author uncovered considerable volatility (start-ups and closures) in the service sector. The volatility rate for this sector was 31% compared with 23% for the manufacturing sector. Firms that do not innovate frequently are replaced by new ones that have new or improved products to offer or by those that employ more efficient methods of production and delivery.

    Release date: 2000-01-17

  • Technical products: 21-601-M1999039
    Description:

    This paper examines the relation between human capital and rural development.

    Release date: 2000-01-14

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-573-X
    Description:

    The international Adult Literacy Survey of 1994 is an important source of information about the literacy levels of Canadians as well as the factors that can explain the disparities between certain sub-populations. The current study shows and tries to explain some of the disparities between Francophones and Anglophones in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000123
    Description:

    Recent studies have demonstrated the quantitative importance of entry, exit, growth and decline in the industrial population. It is this turnover that rewards innovative activity and contributes to productivity growth.

    While the size of the entry population is impressive - especially when cumulated over time - the importance of entry is ultimately due to its impact on innovation in the economy. Experimentation is important in a dynamic, market-based economy. A key part of the experimentation comes from entrants. New entrepreneurs constantly offer consumers new products both in terms of the basic good and the level of service that accompanies it.

    This experimentation is associated with significant costs since many entrants fail. Young firms are most at risk of failure; data drawn from a longitudinal file of Canadian entrants in both the goods and service sectors show that over half the new firms that fail do so in the first two years of life. Life is short for the majority of entrants. Only 1 in 5 new firms survive to their tenth birthday.

    Since so many entrants fall by the wayside, it is of inherent interest to understand the conditions that are associated with success, the conditions that allow the potential in new entrepreneurs to come to fruition. The success of an entrant is due to its choosing the correct combination of strategies and activities. To understand how these capabilities contribute to growth, it is necessary to study how the performance of entrants relates to differences in strategies and pursued activities.

    This paper describes the environment and the characteristics of entrants that manage to survive and grow. In doing so, it focuses on two issues. The first is the innovativeness of entrants and the extent to which their growth depends on their innovativeness. The second is to outline how the stress on worker skills, which is partially related to training, complements innovation and contributes to growth.

    Release date: 2000-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000141
    Description:

    Using three waves (1982, 1986, 1990) of the National Graduate Survey (NGS) we analyze the time it takes graduates of Canadian universities to start a full time job that lasts six months or more. We analyze duration to first job using the Cox proportional hazards model. Our results suggest large differences in the speed of the transition to work both within and between cohorts. They also suggest that the differences in duration to first job across NGS cohorts are not just driven by differences in business cycle conditions at the time of graduation. Over certain segments of duration the patterns of job-starting are similar across cohorts. Within cohorts the differences in the school-to-work transition across certain demographic groups are small, and for some the differences remain stable across cohorts.

    Release date: 2000-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000015409
    Description:

    This article examines whether the education levels of graduates surpass the needs of employers, and to what extent.

    Release date: 2000-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000015410
    Description:

    This article provides an analysis of the employment and earnings patterns of recent postsecondary graduates, based on three waves of the National Graduates Surveys.

    Release date: 2000-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990045144
    Description:

    This article explores the effects of increasing costs on university attendance and the subsequent labour market outcomes of graduates.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990045143
    Description:

    This article explores regional differences among students who drop out of Canadian universities and community colleges.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990045145
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of young people who responded to the 1991 School Leavers Survey (SLS), but who subsequently failed to respond to the 1995 School Leavers Follow-up Survey (SLF).

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2000007
    Description:

    This paper addresses the problem of statistical inference with ordinal variates and examines the robustness to alternative literacy measurement and scaling choices of rankings of average literacy and of estimates of the impact of literacy on individual earnings.

    Release date: 2000-06-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000025126
    Description:

    To understand the relationship between S&T skills and the labour market Statistics Canada has produced a study that provides insight into where S&T skills are deployed. As a group, the number of persons with S&T degrees, pegged at 5 million in 1996, has been growing five times faster than the number of non S&T degree holders. The highest concentrations of S&T graduates are in health (52.0% have S&T degrees), business services (38.1%), and construction (34.3%).

    Release date: 2000-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990035008
    Description:

    This paper examines available empirical evidence about the loss of knowledge workers from Canada to the United States (brain drain) and the gain of knowledge workers in Canada from the rest of the world (brain gain).

    Release date: 2000-05-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000146
    Description:

    In this paper, we investigate the extent to which Canadians were exposed to low income during the 1993-1996 period. Our main findings are the following. First, while 1 in 10 Canadians live in families with low income in a given year, as many as 1 in 5 are exposed to at least one year of low income during a 4-year interval. Second, 1 in 20 Canadians are exposed to low income for 4 consecutive years. Third, 40% to 60% of individuals who fall into low income in a given year will no longer have low income the following year. Fourth, some spells of low income last a long time: of all spells started in 1994, 30% lasted 3 years or more. Fifth, Canadians who are the most susceptible to low income tend to be young; to have little education; to be students and to live as unattached individuals or in lone-parent families. As well, Canadians facing disabilities that entail work limitations, those who are members of visible minorities (when considering the exposure to 4 years of low income) or who have immigrated in or after 1977 tend to experience low income. Sixth, high probabilities of being exposed to low income do not necessarily imply high income gaps, that is, the average income of those in low income may be quite close to the low income cut-off. As a result, a complete understanding of the extent to which Canadians are exposed to low income requires an analysis of both the probabilities of being exposed and the income gaps while being exposed.

    Release date: 2000-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000014889
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article compares school and work activities, as well as the unemployment and part-time employment rates, of students and non-students. (Adapted from the Autumn 1999 issue of Labour Force.)

    Release date: 2000-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024899
    Description:

    This article explores the role of parents in the learning environment of children aged 6 to 11 years, using results from the first cycle of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024897
    Description:

    This article focusses on children who receive special education because of a physical, emotional, behavioural or other problem. It uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024898
    Description:

    This article explores children's academic achievement, behaviour, classroom environment and other school-related experiences, using the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024900
    Description:

    This article explores the effects of early childhood education and care programs on school performance and experiences.

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990025344
    Description:

    A Statistics Canada study uses business demographics to learn about innovation and technological change and uncovers interesting patterns. Contrary to expectations, the author uncovered considerable volatility (start-ups and closures) in the service sector. The volatility rate for this sector was 31% compared with 23% for the manufacturing sector. Firms that do not innovate frequently are replaced by new ones that have new or improved products to offer or by those that employ more efficient methods of production and delivery.

    Release date: 2000-01-17

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

  • Technical products: 89F0120X
    Description:

    Direct measures of skill attainment such as the International Adult Literacy Survey are used to assess the importance of educational outcome skills such as literacy in determining labour market outcomes such as earnings. Policy makers also use them to direct resources most efficiently. However, these skill measures are the product of complex statistical procedures. This paper examines the mathematical robustness of the International Adult Literacy Survey measures against other possibilities in estimating the impact of literacy on individual earnings.

    Release date: 2000-06-02

  • Index and guides: 98-187-X
    Description:

    Censuses of Canada, 1665 to 1871, Statistics of Canada, Volume IV was printed in Ottawa, in 1876, from the Censuses of Canada, 1870-71. This volume contains about 343 statistical tables on the social and economic conditions in Canada from the earliest settlements to Confederation and onto 1871. The results from 98 censuses are arranged in chronological order, with some explanatory notes. In most cases, there are sufficient descriptions of the individual series to enable the reader to use them without consulting the numerous basic sources referenced in the publication.

    An electronic version of this historical publication is accessible on the Internet site of Statistics Canada. The Introduction is a free downloadable document in text as HTML pages for on-line viewing and Adobe Acrobat (PDF) files for printing. The statistical tables are available through E-STAT* (which allows both on-line viewing and downloading).

    Release date: 2000-05-26

  • Technical products: 21-601-M1999039
    Description:

    This paper examines the relation between human capital and rural development.

    Release date: 2000-01-14

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