Statistics by subject – Education, training and learning

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  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016030
    Description:

    This article, the first of three, gives an overview of this study of the determinants of elementary and high school mathematics and science performance, the economic returns of adult literacy, and the diffusion of science and technology (S&T) graduates into the work force.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016031
    Description:

    This article, the second of three, describes elementary and secondary school participation and performance in science and technology (S&T) courses.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016032
    Description:

    This article, the third and last of a series, examines science and technology (S&T) graduates, their postsecondary studies and their early careers.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001178
    Description:

    The school performance of the children of immigrants in the Canadian school system is analyzed using data from the first three waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). School performance is measured in terms of ability at reading, writing, mathematics and overall aptitude. The parents' and teachers' assessments of the children's performances are used, as are the results of formal testing. On average, children of immigrants generally do at least as well as the children of the Canadian-born along each dimension of school performance. The children of immigrant parents whose first language is either English or French have especially high outcomes. The children of other immigrant parents have lower performance in reading, writing and composition but their performance in mathematics is comparable to that of the children of Canadian-born parents. It is also found that with more years in the Canadian education system, the performance of these children in reading, writing and mathematics improves and is equal to or greater than the performance of the children of Canadian-born parents by age thirteen in virtually all areas of performance.

    Release date: 2001-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010075883
    Description:

    This paper describes the incidence of training activity and the duration of training episodes during the 1990s among adult Canadians who were not full- or part-time students.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-574-X
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) was a 22-country study conducted between 1994 and 1998. In every country nationally representative samples of adults aged 16-65 were interviewed and assessed at home. The goals of the survey were to create comparable literacy profiles across national, linguistic and cultural boundaries and to study the factors that influence literacy proficiency. One factor in particular was singled out for attention, namely the role of adult education and training in improving literacy skills and wider labor market outcomes. The monograph series includes studies by literacy scholars and experts drawing on the IALS database. This particular monograph was funded by the United States Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Division of Adult Education and Literacy. Other studies in the series were funded primarily by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    Today the capacity of labor markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning is therefore an issue of considerable strategic importance.

    This monograph presents 15 international indicators that allow readers to compare the volume of adult education participation in North America with that of other advanced industrialized nations. The data offer a comparative snapshot of the total adult education effort as well as the social distribution of adult education opportunities in the mid to late 1990s. The findings generally suggest that both Canada and the United States have mature adult education and training markets. However, the findings also indicate that there are major differences among countries in who gets trained, and how much. On most measures North America finds itself in an average position, ahead of emerging economies but behind the Nordic countries.

    Release date: 2001-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000045862
    Description:

    This study examines factors influencing academic performance of Grade 3 students in Ontario, using data from standardized tests administered in 1997 by the province's Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO).

    Release date: 2001-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000045860
    Description:

    This study investigates in the relationship between socio-economic characteristics of the population and the rate at which different groups of workers take training, using the Adult Education and Training Survey.

    Release date: 2001-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000045861
    Description:

    This study looks at why graduates decide to change jobs.

    Release date: 2001-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000045863
    Description:

    The Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) compares and contrasts the teaching and learning of mathematics and science in elementary and secondary schools around the world in order to improve the education of young people in these two major areas.

    Release date: 2001-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001003
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of Canadians with literacy problems as victims in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000035715
    Description:

    This study explores why female university students, who outnumber male students, remain underrepresented in several professions, including engineering.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000035717
    Description:

    This article examines the labour market outcomes of culture graduates at the university level.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000035385
    Description:

    This article looks at the changes and development of education in Canada during the 20th century.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Technical products: 81-586-X
    Description:

    In today's emerging knowledge societies, the capacity of labour markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning has therefore become an issue of considerable strategic importance. But how are the Canadian markets for adult education and training evolving?

    This report presents, for the first time, evidence on the development of adult education and training in Canada during the last decade. Examined are not only broad trends in the demand and supply of adult education, but also the factors contributing to observed developments. Survey data collected in 1998 allow readers to gauge the current situation and make comparisons over time and across Canadian provinces. The findings indicate, first, that growth in adult education participation has slowed in recent years, and second, that there are major differences between the provinces in who gets trained, and how much.

    Release date: 2001-05-29

  • Technical products: 81-589-X
    Description:

    The report Children and youth at risk documents the proceedings of a symposium held in Ottawa on April 6 and 7, 2000 to explore research and policy issues concerning the education of children who, for whatever reason, are at risk of not meeting the normal expectations of the education system.

    It includes summaries of presentations, discussions and commissioned research papers. The themes and issues are summarized in a synthesis written by Dr. Robert Crocker of the faculty of education at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

    The symposium was held as an activity of the Pan-Canadian Education Research Agenda. The Canadian Education Statistics Council - a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada - started this research program with a view to promoting research on policy issues in education of concern to researchers, policy-makers and practitioners. Human Resources Development Canada provided financial support for the symposium.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015845
    Description:

    The authors began their paper by providing background on public education, public policy, and the at-risk concept and its designation. The authors also noted the increased awareness in the literature around the notion of resilience. The central point of the concluding section of the authors' presentation and paper illustrated examples of alternative schools, which have proven to be successful with at-risk students.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015839
    Description:

    The first section of the paper and Dr. Puentes-Newman's presentation highlighted several of the meanings that exist for the concept of "at risk" in the existing literature. The subsequent section of the paper focuses on resilience. This term is used to describe children who succeed and have positive outcomes despite adversity.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015836
    Description:

    Alan King's presentation focussed on structural factors that affect students and put them at risk of not completing school, in addition to other serious health problems. His findings were drawn from previous work carried out in cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO) and a series of studies related to the health behaviour of children in school.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015847
    Description:

    Dr. Finnie began his paper and his presentation by noting that since its commencement in 1964, the Canadian Student Loan Program (CSLP) has aided millions of Canadians in meeting career goals and taking their education to a higher level.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015850
    Description:

    This attempt at a synthesis will centre around three questions: "What do we know about children and youth at risk?" "What do we need to know?" and "What are the major policy issues surrounding this area that might be informed by research?"

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015838
    Description:

    Dr. Wagemaker started his presentation with an introduction to his organization, the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). The IEA encompasses over 56 member countries, including Canada.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015846
    Description:

    This paper addressed the need for alternative education systems and programs for "at-risk" African-Canadian, visible minority, and First Nations children and youth.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015843
    Description:

    Labour Force Survey data reveal that dropout rates decreased throughout the 1990s in Canada. In 1999, the dropout rate stood at 15.1 per cent for 18- to 19 year-olds and 11.9 per cent for 20- to 24 year-olds.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

Analysis (24)

Analysis (24) (24 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016030
    Description:

    This article, the first of three, gives an overview of this study of the determinants of elementary and high school mathematics and science performance, the economic returns of adult literacy, and the diffusion of science and technology (S&T) graduates into the work force.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016031
    Description:

    This article, the second of three, describes elementary and secondary school participation and performance in science and technology (S&T) courses.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016032
    Description:

    This article, the third and last of a series, examines science and technology (S&T) graduates, their postsecondary studies and their early careers.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001178
    Description:

    The school performance of the children of immigrants in the Canadian school system is analyzed using data from the first three waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). School performance is measured in terms of ability at reading, writing, mathematics and overall aptitude. The parents' and teachers' assessments of the children's performances are used, as are the results of formal testing. On average, children of immigrants generally do at least as well as the children of the Canadian-born along each dimension of school performance. The children of immigrant parents whose first language is either English or French have especially high outcomes. The children of other immigrant parents have lower performance in reading, writing and composition but their performance in mathematics is comparable to that of the children of Canadian-born parents. It is also found that with more years in the Canadian education system, the performance of these children in reading, writing and mathematics improves and is equal to or greater than the performance of the children of Canadian-born parents by age thirteen in virtually all areas of performance.

    Release date: 2001-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010075883
    Description:

    This paper describes the incidence of training activity and the duration of training episodes during the 1990s among adult Canadians who were not full- or part-time students.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-574-X
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) was a 22-country study conducted between 1994 and 1998. In every country nationally representative samples of adults aged 16-65 were interviewed and assessed at home. The goals of the survey were to create comparable literacy profiles across national, linguistic and cultural boundaries and to study the factors that influence literacy proficiency. One factor in particular was singled out for attention, namely the role of adult education and training in improving literacy skills and wider labor market outcomes. The monograph series includes studies by literacy scholars and experts drawing on the IALS database. This particular monograph was funded by the United States Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Division of Adult Education and Literacy. Other studies in the series were funded primarily by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    Today the capacity of labor markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning is therefore an issue of considerable strategic importance.

    This monograph presents 15 international indicators that allow readers to compare the volume of adult education participation in North America with that of other advanced industrialized nations. The data offer a comparative snapshot of the total adult education effort as well as the social distribution of adult education opportunities in the mid to late 1990s. The findings generally suggest that both Canada and the United States have mature adult education and training markets. However, the findings also indicate that there are major differences among countries in who gets trained, and how much. On most measures North America finds itself in an average position, ahead of emerging economies but behind the Nordic countries.

    Release date: 2001-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000045862
    Description:

    This study examines factors influencing academic performance of Grade 3 students in Ontario, using data from standardized tests administered in 1997 by the province's Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO).

    Release date: 2001-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000045860
    Description:

    This study investigates in the relationship between socio-economic characteristics of the population and the rate at which different groups of workers take training, using the Adult Education and Training Survey.

    Release date: 2001-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000045861
    Description:

    This study looks at why graduates decide to change jobs.

    Release date: 2001-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000045863
    Description:

    The Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) compares and contrasts the teaching and learning of mathematics and science in elementary and secondary schools around the world in order to improve the education of young people in these two major areas.

    Release date: 2001-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001003
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of Canadians with literacy problems as victims in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000035715
    Description:

    This study explores why female university students, who outnumber male students, remain underrepresented in several professions, including engineering.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000035717
    Description:

    This article examines the labour market outcomes of culture graduates at the university level.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000035385
    Description:

    This article looks at the changes and development of education in Canada during the 20th century.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001170
    Description:

    Using a new dataset which combines the 1982-1997 tax records and administrative records of British Columbia bachelors graduates from the classes of 1974-96, the real market income of graduates is examined, focussing on changes in income between graduating cohorts, as well as differences across major fields of study. For men and women BC graduates, there has been a decline in real annual income received after graduation for more recent cohorts which is eventually offset by a higher growth rate in income. Also, annual incomes after graduation are relatively high for graduates with applied degrees such as in the engineering, education, and health fields, however, incomes converge as graduate cohorts age. The former finding is at odds with those of Beaudry and Green (1997) who found that weekly earnings declined across cohorts for male university graduates, with no offsetting rise in the growth rate (their results were more similar for women). Differences may be due to this paper's use of annual income as an outcome measure, or its focus on BC student's outcomes rather than national outcomes.

    Release date: 2001-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001154
    Description:

    This paper examines the ways that innovation status as opposed to technology use affects the training activities of manufacturing plants. It examines training that is introduced as a response to specific skill shortages versus training that is implemented in response to the introduction of advanced equipment.

    Advanced technology users are more likely to have workers in highly skilled occupations, to face greater shortages for these workers, and they are more likely to train workers in response to these shortages than are plants that do not use advanced technologies.

    The introduction of new techniques is also accompanied by differences in the incidence of training, with advanced technology users being more likely to introduce training programs than non-users. Here, innovation status within the group of technology users also affects the training decision. In particular, innovating and non-innovating technology users diverge with regards to the extent and nature of training that is undertaken in response to the introduction of new advanced equipment. Innovators are more likely to provide training for this purpose and to prefer on-the-job training to other forms. Non-innovators are less likely to offer training under these circumstances and when they do, it is more likely to be done in a classroom, either off-site or at the firm.

    These findings emphasize that training occurs for more than one reason. Shortages related to insufficient supply provide one rational. But it is not here that innovative firms stand out. Rather they appear to respond differentially to the introduction of new equipment by extensively implementing training that is highly firm-specific. This suggests that innovation requires new skills that are not so much occupation specific (though that is no doubt present) but general cognitive skills that come from operating in an innovative environment that involves improving the problem-solving capabilities of many in the workforce. These problem-solving capabilities occur in a learning-by-doing setting with hands on experience.

    Release date: 2001-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2001008
    Description:

    This study investigates the relationship between labour market success and literacy skills, specifically prose literacy, document literacy and quantitative literacy or numeracy. It focuses on the relationship between literacy and annual, weekly and hourly earnings.

    Release date: 2001-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20000035565
    Description:

    Over the last few years, we have learned a great deal about the culture labour force. We know that culture workers have, on average, higher levels of education, higher rates of self-employment, lower rates of unemployment, lower wages, a greater likelihood of working part-time, and a tendency to be concentrated in certain regions of the country.

    Release date: 2001-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000045560
    Description:

    This article looks at informal or self-directed learning.

    Release date: 2001-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000025526
    Description:

    This article studies the links among academic achievement, children's views of themselves, and adults' support during the transition to early adolescence. It uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2001-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000025524
    Description:

    This study examines the extent to which postsecondary graduates use their acquired skills, and the correspondence of their educational qualifications to the job requirements.

    Release date: 2001-03-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-572-X
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey was a 22-country initiative conducted between 1994 and 1998. In every country nationally representative samples of adults aged 16-65 were interviewed and tested at home, using the same literacy test. The main purpose of the survey was to find out how well adults use information to function in society. Another aim was to investigate the factors that influence literacy proficiency and to compare these between countries.

    This monograph presents 10 international indicators that allow readers to compare the literacy proficiency of Americans with that of other populations. The findings confirm that low literacy is an important issue in all regions and countries surveyed.

    Release date: 2001-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001153
    Description:

    In this paper a dynamic employment model for women is estimated for rural and urban samples from the first four years of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics 1993 to 1996. The results provide evidence that there are significant differences between rural and urban labour markets. However, these do not appear to arise - as is often argued - from a lack of childcare facilities, differences in returns to human capital, or the existence of more "traditional" attitudes to the proper role of women in rural areas. The results also suggest labour market segmentation within rural areas with clear differences in employment for women belonging to low income households as shown in the decomposition results.

    Release date: 2001-02-01

Reference (21)

Reference (21) (21 of 21 results)

  • Technical products: 81-586-X
    Description:

    In today's emerging knowledge societies, the capacity of labour markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning has therefore become an issue of considerable strategic importance. But how are the Canadian markets for adult education and training evolving?

    This report presents, for the first time, evidence on the development of adult education and training in Canada during the last decade. Examined are not only broad trends in the demand and supply of adult education, but also the factors contributing to observed developments. Survey data collected in 1998 allow readers to gauge the current situation and make comparisons over time and across Canadian provinces. The findings indicate, first, that growth in adult education participation has slowed in recent years, and second, that there are major differences between the provinces in who gets trained, and how much.

    Release date: 2001-05-29

  • Technical products: 81-589-X
    Description:

    The report Children and youth at risk documents the proceedings of a symposium held in Ottawa on April 6 and 7, 2000 to explore research and policy issues concerning the education of children who, for whatever reason, are at risk of not meeting the normal expectations of the education system.

    It includes summaries of presentations, discussions and commissioned research papers. The themes and issues are summarized in a synthesis written by Dr. Robert Crocker of the faculty of education at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

    The symposium was held as an activity of the Pan-Canadian Education Research Agenda. The Canadian Education Statistics Council - a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada - started this research program with a view to promoting research on policy issues in education of concern to researchers, policy-makers and practitioners. Human Resources Development Canada provided financial support for the symposium.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015845
    Description:

    The authors began their paper by providing background on public education, public policy, and the at-risk concept and its designation. The authors also noted the increased awareness in the literature around the notion of resilience. The central point of the concluding section of the authors' presentation and paper illustrated examples of alternative schools, which have proven to be successful with at-risk students.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015839
    Description:

    The first section of the paper and Dr. Puentes-Newman's presentation highlighted several of the meanings that exist for the concept of "at risk" in the existing literature. The subsequent section of the paper focuses on resilience. This term is used to describe children who succeed and have positive outcomes despite adversity.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015836
    Description:

    Alan King's presentation focussed on structural factors that affect students and put them at risk of not completing school, in addition to other serious health problems. His findings were drawn from previous work carried out in cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO) and a series of studies related to the health behaviour of children in school.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015847
    Description:

    Dr. Finnie began his paper and his presentation by noting that since its commencement in 1964, the Canadian Student Loan Program (CSLP) has aided millions of Canadians in meeting career goals and taking their education to a higher level.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015850
    Description:

    This attempt at a synthesis will centre around three questions: "What do we know about children and youth at risk?" "What do we need to know?" and "What are the major policy issues surrounding this area that might be informed by research?"

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015838
    Description:

    Dr. Wagemaker started his presentation with an introduction to his organization, the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). The IEA encompasses over 56 member countries, including Canada.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015846
    Description:

    This paper addressed the need for alternative education systems and programs for "at-risk" African-Canadian, visible minority, and First Nations children and youth.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015843
    Description:

    Labour Force Survey data reveal that dropout rates decreased throughout the 1990s in Canada. In 1999, the dropout rate stood at 15.1 per cent for 18- to 19 year-olds and 11.9 per cent for 20- to 24 year-olds.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015842
    Description:

    The central issues of Dr. Volpe's paper and presentation focussed on best practices of school-linked services and the reasons why school-linked services have been difficult to implement.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015844
    Description:

    The at-risk child is defined by the author as a "child whose personal characteristics or environmental characteristics" indicate "at a very early age, a strong probability of psychopathologic development." Therefore, in the second section of the paper, the author focussed on intervention strategies for vulnerable children. The third section of the paper summarized resilience and its construct. The fourth section of the paper focussed on risk factors and protection factors. The author concluded his presentation and his paper by asserting that resiliency studies are very complex owing to the multiple interaction between the various environmental factors.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015837
    Description:

    Allen Zeesman shared findings from the National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth (NLSCY) and the Understanding the Early Years survey (UEY).

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015848
    Description:

    The authors began by noting that the concept of the "adolescent mother" encompasses a multitude of factors and indicators, which include the rates of fertility (birth rates) and pregnancy.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015840
    Description:

    Dr. Schonert-Reichl began her paper and her presentation by demonstrating the ambiguity and vagueness that exist in defining the at-risk concept. Dr. Schonert-Reichl also described in both her presentation and her paper the role that schools play in the facilitation and reduction of risk and its implications for intervention and policy. The author concluded by emphasizing the need for a shift in focus from risk to resiliency as a priority area for future research.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015835
    Description:

    Dr. Levin started his presentation with a comparison of the worlds of research and policy. In the world of social science research, he pointed to findings that are often indefinite and less than profound, and that do not necessarily reflect a consensus among researchers.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-586-X19980015873
    Description:

    In this chapter, the patterns of participation in education and training as well as demand and supply characteristics of Canadian adult education and training are examined.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Technical products: 81-586-X19980015872
    Description:

    The purpose of this report is to describe the extent to which Canadians engage in various formal and organised adult education and training activites, and how participation differs both over time and across provinces.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Technical products: 81-586-X19980015874
    Description:

    The purpose of this chapter is to present, for the first time, an overview of major trends in Canadian adult education and training. Data from a series of national adult education and training surveys have been brought together for analytical purposes for the first time.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Technical products: 81-586-X19980015875
    Description:

    An analysis of the demand and supply of adult education and training in Canada was presented in Chapter 1, using data derived from the 1998 Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS). Chapter 2 examined major trends in adult education and training incidence and volume, drawing on national survey data collected over 15 years. This concluding chapter is an overview and discussion of the main findings. It also indicated some potential direction for future research.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-588-X
    Description:

    The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions and support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

    Objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions are also included family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences.

    The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.

    Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 will include information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design will permit analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.

    The sample design for the cohort aged 18-20 is similar to that of the Labour-Force survey. The method of data collection is computer-assisted telephone interviewing. The pilot survey was conducted in January 1999. In January-February 2000, 23, 000 youth participated in the main survey data collection.

    Data from both cohorts is expected to be available in 2001. Following release of the first international report by the OECD/PISA project and the first national report, data will be publically available, permitting detailed exploration of content themes.

    Release date: 2001-04-11

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