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All (27) (25 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2002010
    Description:

    This publication provides a general picture of francophone literacy in Canada and discusses literacy in the context of language transfers to English. It also looks at the process of producing literacy and the literacy training of francophones, while attempting to sort out the impacts that various social and cultural factors have on literacy.

    Release date: 2002-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2002001
    Description:

    This study examines the difference in reading performance between students in rural and urban schools. It uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA).

    Release date: 2002-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010046387
    Description:

    This analysis addresses issues around student borrowing and debt loads, using data from the Canadian Student Loan Program.

    Release date: 2002-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010046385
    Description:

    Using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment, this article examines issues relating to access and use of information and communications technology (ICT). The issues under study include: - the extent to which Canadian youth have access to and use ICT; - how access to and use of ICT by Canadian youth compares with that of children in other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries; - the relationship of ICT access and use to a student's gender; - whether the child was born in Canada; - the province lived in; - the school attended; and - socio-economic status.

    Release date: 2002-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010046386
    Description:

    This article estimates the cost for Canadian students studying in a master's program for one full year at a Canadian university, by province, field of study and gender. It uses the National Graduates Survey and supplemental information on tuition, incidental fees, books, room and board, and lost income.

    Release date: 2002-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002182
    Description:

    International migration is a joint outcome of the individual's desire to migrate and the host country's selection process. First, the potential migrants apply to a host country, then the host country chooses migrants from the applicant pool. The theoretical focus of the earlier literature was centred on the desire to migrate, while the empirical literature focused on the actual migrants, while migration is the product of these two factors. The objective of this paper is to identify the components of this two-step, decision-making process

    Parameters in the migration model relate directly to policy instruments such as the points awarded for various characteristics. Given the parameter estimates of the model and the general analysis of immigration policy, a study of the factors determining the individual's decision to apply can be done in a way that has not been possible up until now. Using samples of migrants and non-migrants, the model is estimated for migration from two different source countries, the United States and the United Kingdom, to Canada.

    For migrants, a newly available longitudinal data set, the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), has been used. The richness of this database, which surveys immigrants to Canada over a long period and contains information on both their application and subsequent earnings, permits the investigation of a large range of questions that could not be fruitfully addressed before. Estimation of the two-step framework provides important insights on the effects of factors, such as education and income, that help establish this selection process.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Technical products: 81-593-X
    Description:

    This Pan-Canadian Education Research Agenda (PCERA) 2001 symposium report documents the proceedings of a symposium held at Laval University in Québec on May 22 and 23, 2001. The symposium, which was held in conjunction with the Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE) and the Canadian Society for the Study of Higher Education (CSSHE) during the Annual Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, explored research and policy issues related to the role of teacher education/educator training, teacher/educator supply and demand, teacher/educator professional development, indicators of success, and leadership.

    This report includes summaries of speeches, discussions and research presentations, as well as research paper abstracts and the researchers' biographies. According to the report, new teachers and educators will need more support and resources to succeed. Professional growth plans and other professional development strategies for teachers and educators should be investigated to effectively promote lifelong learning. The report suggests that partnerships between universities and schools could strengthen teacher training programs.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Technical products: 81-592-X
    Description:

    This Pan-Canadian Education Research Agenda (PCERA) 2001 symposium synthesis report was written by Dr. Yvonne Hébert of the University of Calgary. This synthesis report offers a critical review of the research presented at the third PCERA symposium held at Laval University in Québec on May 22 and 23, 2001. The symposium, which was held in conjunction with the Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE) and the Canadian Society for the Study of Higher Education (CSSHE) during the annual Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, explored research and policy issues related to the role of teacher education/educator training, teacher/educator supply and demand, teacher/educator professional development, indicators of success, and leadership.

    This report addresses the major policy issues that were discussed at the event and offers recommendations for future research.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20010016308
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The Census Bureau uses response error analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of survey questions. For a given survey, questions that are deemed critical to the survey or considered problematic from past examination are selected for analysis. New or revised questions are prime candidates for re-interview. Re-interview is a new interview where a subset of questions from the original interview are re-asked to a sample of the survey respondents. For each re-interview question, the proportion of respondents who give inconsistent responses is evaluated. The "Index of Inconsistency" is used as the measure of response variance. Each question is labelled low, moderate, or high in response variance. In high response variance cases, the questions are put through cognitive testing, and modifications to the question are recommended.

    The Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) sponsored by The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), is also investigated for response error analysis and the possible relationships between inconsistent responses and characteristics of the schools and teachers in that survey. Results of this analysis can be used to change survey procedures and improve data quality.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20010016269
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    In surveys with low response rates, non-response bias can be a major concern. While it is not always possible to measure the actual bias due to non-response, there are different approaches that help identify potential sources of non-response bias. In the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), surveys with a response rate lower than 70% must conduct a non-response bias analysis. This paper discusses the different approaches to non-response bias analyses using examples from NCES.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20010016293
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    This paper presents the Second Summit of the Americas Regional Education Indicators Project (PRIE), whose basic goal is to develop a set of comparable indicators for the Americas. This project is led by the Ministry of Education of Chile and has been developed in response to the countries' needs to improve their information systems and statistics. The countries need to construct reliable and relevant indicators to support decisions in education, both within their individual countries and the region as a whole. The first part of the paper analyses the importance of statistics and indicators in supporting educational policies and programs, and describes the present state of the information and statistics systems in these countries. It also discusses the major problems faced by the countries and reviews the countries' experiences in participating in other education indicators' projects or programs, such as the INES Program, WEI Project, MERCOSUR and CREMIS. The second part of the paper examines PRIE's technical co-operation program, its purpose and implementation. The second part also emphasizes how technical co-operation responds to the needs of the countries, and supports them in filling in the gaps in available and reliable data.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036216
    Description:

    This paper looks at family income and its impact on participation in postsecondary education, using the first wave of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036217
    Description:

    This paper summarizes research conducted by the British Columbia Teachers' Federation (BCTF) on teacher workload and stress. The study comprises surveys on secondary English teachers' workload, all teachers' workload, and special education issues.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036215
    Description:

    This research paper documents patterns of self-employment among postsecondary graduates categorized by level of study in the five years immediately following their graduation.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002191
    Description:

    This study assesses how geographic distance between home and school affects the probability of attending university shortly after high school graduation. Students that grow up near a university can save on costs by staying home to attend the local university and thus may be more likely to attend. Using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, a database of Canadian university postal codes and a special postal code conversion file that calculates the geographic co-ordinates of postal codes, it was possible to estimate the straight-line distances between the homes of high school students prior to graduating and the nearest university. After controlling for family income, parental education and other factors associated with university participation, students living 'out-of-commuting distance' are far less likely to attend than are students living 'within commuting distance.' Distance also plays a role in the relationship between university participation and its other correlates, such as family income and sex.

    Release date: 2002-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010046202
    Description:

    This article looks at the labour market experiences of recent culture graduates, with a focus on comparing university graduates with their community college and collège d'enseignement général et professionel (CEGEP) counterparts.

    Release date: 2002-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016197
    Description:

    This study identifies factors that influenced Ontario Grade 3 student achievement using a reference group to assess the impact of changes in student, class and school characteristics.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010026167
    Description:

    This paper describes the incidence of training activity and the duration of training episodes during the 1990s among adult Canadians who were not full-time or part-time students. It uses the Adult Education and Training Surveys.

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002003
    Description:

    This paper compares the social and demographic characteristics of the small civic core that accounts for about three-quarters of all volunteering, giving and community activities in Canada with those who are relatively inactive in civic affairs.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002164
    Description:

    This paper reports the results of an empirical analysis of the early career outcomes of recent Canadian Bachelor's level graduates by discipline based on three waves of the National Graduates Surveys, which comprise large, representative databases of individuals who successfully completed their programmes at Canadian universities in 1982, 1986, and 1990, with information gathered during interviews conducted two and five years after graduation for each group of graduates (1984/87, 1988/92, 1990/95).

    The outcomes analysed, all broken down by sex and discipline, include: the distribution of graduates by field and the percentage of female graduates; the percentage of graduates who subsequently completed another educational programme; the overall evaluation of the choice of major (would they choose it again?); unemployment rates, the percentage of workers in part-time jobs, in temporary jobs, self-employed; the job-education skill and credentials matches; earnings levels and rates of growth; and job satisfaction (earnings, overall).

    Many of the outcomes conform to expectations, typically reflecting the different orientations of the various disciplines with respect to direct career preparedness, with the professions and other applied disciplines generally characterised by lower unemployment rates, closer skill and qualification matches, higher earnings, and so on. On the other hand, while the "applied" fields also tend to perform well in terms of the "softer", more subjective measures regarding job satisfaction and the overall evaluation of the chosen programme (would the graduate choose the same major again?), the findings also indicate that graduates' assessments of their post-graduation experiences and overall evaluations of the programmes from which they graduated are based on more than simply adding up standard measures of labour market "success", with the job satisfaction scores and - perhaps most interestingly - the overall programme evaluations often departing from what the objective measures (unemployment rates, earnings levels, etc.) might have predicted. Some implications of the findings are discussed and avenues for future research are suggested.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002183
    Description:

    Changes in the labour market such as an increase in the incidence of part-time, part-year work, multiple job holding and self-employment have often been conjectured as demand-driven shifts - that is, that they have resulted from a lack of more traditional job opportunities rather than in response to workers' changing preferences. Yet while the issue of non-standard work is an interesting and important one, there is relatively little existing empirical evidence on the topic.

    The general purpose of this paper is to report the results of an empirical analysis that exploits the self-employment status indicator available in the National Graduates Survey (and Follow-Up) databases. It documents and analyses the patterns of self-employment amongst several cohorts of Canadian post-secondary graduates in the first five years following graduation. More specifically, it provides solid empirical documentation of the incidence of self-employment (levels, patterns, trends) amongst recent college and university graduates, overall, and broken down by degree level, sex and year of graduation. This paper also addresses the issue of whether self-employment tends to be the preferred employment option (for those who enter it), or the result of a lack of suitable "conventional" employment opportunities, or some combination of the two.

    There are two over-arching conclusions to be drawn from the analysis. First, the incidence of self-employment was relatively stable for the first three cohorts of graduates covered in the analysis. The overall rates ranged from 6.5 to 11.1 percent amongst male graduates and from 3.2 to 6.7 percent for females. The rates tended to be higher for some (but not all) graduates of the most recent cohort (graduates of 1995). Second, the evidence generally points to self-employment representing a relatively attractive job status on average: For every cohort the rates of self-employment rise from the first interview following graduation (after two years) to the second (after five years), an interval over which job opportunities generally improve significantly for graduates; Simple point-in-time (cross-sectional) comparisons of earnings, the job-education skill match, and job satisfaction levels suggest that although the results are somewhat mixed, there is little evidence that the self-employment status is generally characterized by less favourable outcomes, and is perhaps particularly marked by generally higher (not lower) overall levels of job satisfaction;Finally, both the conventional cross-sectional earnings model and the difference equations which control for various fixed effects with which job status might be correlated, further point to self-employment being a higher-paying (and therefore more attractive) job status than the conventional paid worker status.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021036210
    Description:

    This article examines barriers to job-related training, the groups that experience these obstacles and whether access to training has improved over time.

    Release date: 2002-03-20

  • Table: 97F0023X
    Description:

    The Topic Bundles (22) are a series of tables that were released as the variables from the 2001 Census of Population became available. Each Topic Bundle contains cross-tabulations for selected levels of geography.

    The release dats of the variables are listed below:Population and Dwelling Counts - March 12, 2002Age and Sex - July 16, 2002Marital Status, Common-law Status, Families, Dwellings and Households - October 22, 2002Language, Mobility and Migration - December 10, 2002Citizenship, Immigration, Birthplace, Generation Status, Ethnic Origin, Visible Minorities, Aboriginal Peoples - January 21, 2003Labour Force Activity, Class of worker, Occupation, Industry, Place of Work, Mode of Transportation, Language of Work, Unpaid Work - February 11, 2003School Attendance, Education, Field of Study, Highest Level of Schooling, Earnings - March 11, 2003Religion, Income of Individuals, Families and Households, Social and Economic Characteristics of Individuals, Families and Households and Housing Costs - May 13, 2003

    Release date: 2002-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010046121
    Description:

    This article examines how people learned their computer skills and which methods they found most important.

    Release date: 2002-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2001009
    Description:

    This study compares the pattern of returns to the education required by an individual's job, including education beyond and below that level, to patterns in other countries. It explores the relationship between literacy skills and the educational requirements of an individual's job.

    Release date: 2002-01-25

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 97F0023X
    Description:

    The Topic Bundles (22) are a series of tables that were released as the variables from the 2001 Census of Population became available. Each Topic Bundle contains cross-tabulations for selected levels of geography.

    The release dats of the variables are listed below:Population and Dwelling Counts - March 12, 2002Age and Sex - July 16, 2002Marital Status, Common-law Status, Families, Dwellings and Households - October 22, 2002Language, Mobility and Migration - December 10, 2002Citizenship, Immigration, Birthplace, Generation Status, Ethnic Origin, Visible Minorities, Aboriginal Peoples - January 21, 2003Labour Force Activity, Class of worker, Occupation, Industry, Place of Work, Mode of Transportation, Language of Work, Unpaid Work - February 11, 2003School Attendance, Education, Field of Study, Highest Level of Schooling, Earnings - March 11, 2003Religion, Income of Individuals, Families and Households, Social and Economic Characteristics of Individuals, Families and Households and Housing Costs - May 13, 2003

    Release date: 2002-03-12

Analysis (21)

Analysis (21) (21 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2002010
    Description:

    This publication provides a general picture of francophone literacy in Canada and discusses literacy in the context of language transfers to English. It also looks at the process of producing literacy and the literacy training of francophones, while attempting to sort out the impacts that various social and cultural factors have on literacy.

    Release date: 2002-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2002001
    Description:

    This study examines the difference in reading performance between students in rural and urban schools. It uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA).

    Release date: 2002-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010046387
    Description:

    This analysis addresses issues around student borrowing and debt loads, using data from the Canadian Student Loan Program.

    Release date: 2002-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010046385
    Description:

    Using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment, this article examines issues relating to access and use of information and communications technology (ICT). The issues under study include: - the extent to which Canadian youth have access to and use ICT; - how access to and use of ICT by Canadian youth compares with that of children in other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries; - the relationship of ICT access and use to a student's gender; - whether the child was born in Canada; - the province lived in; - the school attended; and - socio-economic status.

    Release date: 2002-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010046386
    Description:

    This article estimates the cost for Canadian students studying in a master's program for one full year at a Canadian university, by province, field of study and gender. It uses the National Graduates Survey and supplemental information on tuition, incidental fees, books, room and board, and lost income.

    Release date: 2002-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002182
    Description:

    International migration is a joint outcome of the individual's desire to migrate and the host country's selection process. First, the potential migrants apply to a host country, then the host country chooses migrants from the applicant pool. The theoretical focus of the earlier literature was centred on the desire to migrate, while the empirical literature focused on the actual migrants, while migration is the product of these two factors. The objective of this paper is to identify the components of this two-step, decision-making process

    Parameters in the migration model relate directly to policy instruments such as the points awarded for various characteristics. Given the parameter estimates of the model and the general analysis of immigration policy, a study of the factors determining the individual's decision to apply can be done in a way that has not been possible up until now. Using samples of migrants and non-migrants, the model is estimated for migration from two different source countries, the United States and the United Kingdom, to Canada.

    For migrants, a newly available longitudinal data set, the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), has been used. The richness of this database, which surveys immigrants to Canada over a long period and contains information on both their application and subsequent earnings, permits the investigation of a large range of questions that could not be fruitfully addressed before. Estimation of the two-step framework provides important insights on the effects of factors, such as education and income, that help establish this selection process.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036216
    Description:

    This paper looks at family income and its impact on participation in postsecondary education, using the first wave of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036217
    Description:

    This paper summarizes research conducted by the British Columbia Teachers' Federation (BCTF) on teacher workload and stress. The study comprises surveys on secondary English teachers' workload, all teachers' workload, and special education issues.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036215
    Description:

    This research paper documents patterns of self-employment among postsecondary graduates categorized by level of study in the five years immediately following their graduation.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002191
    Description:

    This study assesses how geographic distance between home and school affects the probability of attending university shortly after high school graduation. Students that grow up near a university can save on costs by staying home to attend the local university and thus may be more likely to attend. Using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, a database of Canadian university postal codes and a special postal code conversion file that calculates the geographic co-ordinates of postal codes, it was possible to estimate the straight-line distances between the homes of high school students prior to graduating and the nearest university. After controlling for family income, parental education and other factors associated with university participation, students living 'out-of-commuting distance' are far less likely to attend than are students living 'within commuting distance.' Distance also plays a role in the relationship between university participation and its other correlates, such as family income and sex.

    Release date: 2002-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010046202
    Description:

    This article looks at the labour market experiences of recent culture graduates, with a focus on comparing university graduates with their community college and collège d'enseignement général et professionel (CEGEP) counterparts.

    Release date: 2002-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016197
    Description:

    This study identifies factors that influenced Ontario Grade 3 student achievement using a reference group to assess the impact of changes in student, class and school characteristics.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010026167
    Description:

    This paper describes the incidence of training activity and the duration of training episodes during the 1990s among adult Canadians who were not full-time or part-time students. It uses the Adult Education and Training Surveys.

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002003
    Description:

    This paper compares the social and demographic characteristics of the small civic core that accounts for about three-quarters of all volunteering, giving and community activities in Canada with those who are relatively inactive in civic affairs.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002164
    Description:

    This paper reports the results of an empirical analysis of the early career outcomes of recent Canadian Bachelor's level graduates by discipline based on three waves of the National Graduates Surveys, which comprise large, representative databases of individuals who successfully completed their programmes at Canadian universities in 1982, 1986, and 1990, with information gathered during interviews conducted two and five years after graduation for each group of graduates (1984/87, 1988/92, 1990/95).

    The outcomes analysed, all broken down by sex and discipline, include: the distribution of graduates by field and the percentage of female graduates; the percentage of graduates who subsequently completed another educational programme; the overall evaluation of the choice of major (would they choose it again?); unemployment rates, the percentage of workers in part-time jobs, in temporary jobs, self-employed; the job-education skill and credentials matches; earnings levels and rates of growth; and job satisfaction (earnings, overall).

    Many of the outcomes conform to expectations, typically reflecting the different orientations of the various disciplines with respect to direct career preparedness, with the professions and other applied disciplines generally characterised by lower unemployment rates, closer skill and qualification matches, higher earnings, and so on. On the other hand, while the "applied" fields also tend to perform well in terms of the "softer", more subjective measures regarding job satisfaction and the overall evaluation of the chosen programme (would the graduate choose the same major again?), the findings also indicate that graduates' assessments of their post-graduation experiences and overall evaluations of the programmes from which they graduated are based on more than simply adding up standard measures of labour market "success", with the job satisfaction scores and - perhaps most interestingly - the overall programme evaluations often departing from what the objective measures (unemployment rates, earnings levels, etc.) might have predicted. Some implications of the findings are discussed and avenues for future research are suggested.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002183
    Description:

    Changes in the labour market such as an increase in the incidence of part-time, part-year work, multiple job holding and self-employment have often been conjectured as demand-driven shifts - that is, that they have resulted from a lack of more traditional job opportunities rather than in response to workers' changing preferences. Yet while the issue of non-standard work is an interesting and important one, there is relatively little existing empirical evidence on the topic.

    The general purpose of this paper is to report the results of an empirical analysis that exploits the self-employment status indicator available in the National Graduates Survey (and Follow-Up) databases. It documents and analyses the patterns of self-employment amongst several cohorts of Canadian post-secondary graduates in the first five years following graduation. More specifically, it provides solid empirical documentation of the incidence of self-employment (levels, patterns, trends) amongst recent college and university graduates, overall, and broken down by degree level, sex and year of graduation. This paper also addresses the issue of whether self-employment tends to be the preferred employment option (for those who enter it), or the result of a lack of suitable "conventional" employment opportunities, or some combination of the two.

    There are two over-arching conclusions to be drawn from the analysis. First, the incidence of self-employment was relatively stable for the first three cohorts of graduates covered in the analysis. The overall rates ranged from 6.5 to 11.1 percent amongst male graduates and from 3.2 to 6.7 percent for females. The rates tended to be higher for some (but not all) graduates of the most recent cohort (graduates of 1995). Second, the evidence generally points to self-employment representing a relatively attractive job status on average: For every cohort the rates of self-employment rise from the first interview following graduation (after two years) to the second (after five years), an interval over which job opportunities generally improve significantly for graduates; Simple point-in-time (cross-sectional) comparisons of earnings, the job-education skill match, and job satisfaction levels suggest that although the results are somewhat mixed, there is little evidence that the self-employment status is generally characterized by less favourable outcomes, and is perhaps particularly marked by generally higher (not lower) overall levels of job satisfaction;Finally, both the conventional cross-sectional earnings model and the difference equations which control for various fixed effects with which job status might be correlated, further point to self-employment being a higher-paying (and therefore more attractive) job status than the conventional paid worker status.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021036210
    Description:

    This article examines barriers to job-related training, the groups that experience these obstacles and whether access to training has improved over time.

    Release date: 2002-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010046121
    Description:

    This article examines how people learned their computer skills and which methods they found most important.

    Release date: 2002-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2001009
    Description:

    This study compares the pattern of returns to the education required by an individual's job, including education beyond and below that level, to patterns in other countries. It explores the relationship between literacy skills and the educational requirements of an individual's job.

    Release date: 2002-01-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-591-X
    Description:

    This report provides a descriptive overview of the first results from the 2000 Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 18-20-year-olds in Canada. The YITS, developed through a partnership between Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a longitudinal survey designed to collect a broad range of information on the education and labour market experiences of youth.

    This report provides new information on high school dropout rates as of December 1999 and compares high school graduates and dropouts on a number of dimensions, including family background, parental education and occupation, engagement with school, working during high school, peer influence, and educational aspirations. This report also provides a first look at pathways followed by young people once they are no longer in high school, including their participation in post-secondary education, employment status, self-assessed skills levels, and barriers to post-secondary education.

    Release date: 2002-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-590-X2000001
    Description:

    The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a collaborative effort among member countries of the OECD, designed to assess, on a regular basis, the achievement of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy through a common international test.

    This report presents initial results for Canada, Canadian provinces and selected countries from PISA 2000. Reading literacy is the major focus of PISA 2000, with mathematical and scientific literacy as minor domains.

    This report also includes results from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), a Canadian longitudinal survey designed to examine the patterns of, and influences on, major transitions in young people's lives, particularly with respect to education, training and work.

    Thirty-two countries participated in PISA 2000. In Canada, approximately 30,000 15-year-old students from more than 1,000 schools participated.

    Release date: 2002-01-03

Reference (5)

Reference (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Technical products: 81-593-X
    Description:

    This Pan-Canadian Education Research Agenda (PCERA) 2001 symposium report documents the proceedings of a symposium held at Laval University in Québec on May 22 and 23, 2001. The symposium, which was held in conjunction with the Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE) and the Canadian Society for the Study of Higher Education (CSSHE) during the Annual Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, explored research and policy issues related to the role of teacher education/educator training, teacher/educator supply and demand, teacher/educator professional development, indicators of success, and leadership.

    This report includes summaries of speeches, discussions and research presentations, as well as research paper abstracts and the researchers' biographies. According to the report, new teachers and educators will need more support and resources to succeed. Professional growth plans and other professional development strategies for teachers and educators should be investigated to effectively promote lifelong learning. The report suggests that partnerships between universities and schools could strengthen teacher training programs.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Technical products: 81-592-X
    Description:

    This Pan-Canadian Education Research Agenda (PCERA) 2001 symposium synthesis report was written by Dr. Yvonne Hébert of the University of Calgary. This synthesis report offers a critical review of the research presented at the third PCERA symposium held at Laval University in Québec on May 22 and 23, 2001. The symposium, which was held in conjunction with the Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE) and the Canadian Society for the Study of Higher Education (CSSHE) during the annual Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, explored research and policy issues related to the role of teacher education/educator training, teacher/educator supply and demand, teacher/educator professional development, indicators of success, and leadership.

    This report addresses the major policy issues that were discussed at the event and offers recommendations for future research.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20010016308
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The Census Bureau uses response error analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of survey questions. For a given survey, questions that are deemed critical to the survey or considered problematic from past examination are selected for analysis. New or revised questions are prime candidates for re-interview. Re-interview is a new interview where a subset of questions from the original interview are re-asked to a sample of the survey respondents. For each re-interview question, the proportion of respondents who give inconsistent responses is evaluated. The "Index of Inconsistency" is used as the measure of response variance. Each question is labelled low, moderate, or high in response variance. In high response variance cases, the questions are put through cognitive testing, and modifications to the question are recommended.

    The Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) sponsored by The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), is also investigated for response error analysis and the possible relationships between inconsistent responses and characteristics of the schools and teachers in that survey. Results of this analysis can be used to change survey procedures and improve data quality.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20010016269
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    In surveys with low response rates, non-response bias can be a major concern. While it is not always possible to measure the actual bias due to non-response, there are different approaches that help identify potential sources of non-response bias. In the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), surveys with a response rate lower than 70% must conduct a non-response bias analysis. This paper discusses the different approaches to non-response bias analyses using examples from NCES.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20010016293
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    This paper presents the Second Summit of the Americas Regional Education Indicators Project (PRIE), whose basic goal is to develop a set of comparable indicators for the Americas. This project is led by the Ministry of Education of Chile and has been developed in response to the countries' needs to improve their information systems and statistics. The countries need to construct reliable and relevant indicators to support decisions in education, both within their individual countries and the region as a whole. The first part of the paper analyses the importance of statistics and indicators in supporting educational policies and programs, and describes the present state of the information and statistics systems in these countries. It also discusses the major problems faced by the countries and reviews the countries' experiences in participating in other education indicators' projects or programs, such as the INES Program, WEI Project, MERCOSUR and CREMIS. The second part of the paper examines PRIE's technical co-operation program, its purpose and implementation. The second part also emphasizes how technical co-operation responds to the needs of the countries, and supports them in filling in the gaps in available and reliable data.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

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