Statistics by subject – Education, training and learning

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  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003011
    Description:

    This report presents a rethinking of the fundamental concepts used to guide statistical work on postsecondary education.

    Release date: 2003-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003001
    Release date: 2003-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036703
    Description:

    This article examines the changing educational attainment profile of Canadians using census data.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036701
    Description:

    This article examines how the educational profiles of francophones, anglophones and allophones have changed over the past 30 years, and the factors that have contributed to many of these changes.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003010
    Description:

    This paper presents data for children aged 0 to 18 years on three important elements of educational planning related to postsecondary education: a home context that promotes and supports postsecondary education, children's academic abilities and perceptions of school, and saving and financial planning for postsecondary education. It uses data collected by the Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), 2002.

    Release date: 2003-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020036671
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of part-time university and college academic staff. It uses Part-time University and College Academic Staff Survey.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020036672
    Description:

    This report examines incidence and duration of training for immigrants and compares their circumstances with Canadians in general. It uses data from the Adult Education and Training Survey.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003008
    Description:

    This report estimates the impact of participating in adult education and training on the employment and earnings of Canadians, using the data from the 1998 Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS).

    Release date: 2003-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003009
    Description:

    This paper examines how the Canadian Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) can be used to study participation in and impacts of education and training activities for adults.

    Release date: 2003-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003210
    Description:

    The relationship between family income and postsecondary participation is studied in order to determine the extent to which higher education in Canada has increasingly become the domain of students from well-to-do families. An analysis of two separate data sets suggests that individuals from higher income families are much more likely to attend university, but this has been a long-standing tendency and the participation gap between students from the highest and lowest income families has in fact narrowed. The relationship between family income and postsecondary participation did become stronger during the early to mid 1990s, but weakened thereafter. This pattern reflects the fact that policy changes increasing the maximum amount of a student loan as well as increases in other forms of support occurred only after tuition fees had already started increasing.

    Release date: 2003-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003200
    Description:

    Using a dataset which combines the 1982-1997 tax records and administrative records of British Columbia bachelor's graduates from the classes of 1974-1996, this study examine the real annual earnings of graduates across 20 major fields of study for significant changes in earnings across cohorts. Male graduates in more recent cohorts had lower mean earnings after graduation but higher returns to experience. Recent cohorts of women graduates had equal earnings levels after graduation and higher returns to experience. Mean earnings differed among fields of study, favouring applied degrees in teacher training, commerce, engineering, nursing and medical sciences, but cohort effects were statistically identical for graduates from all fields of study. These results show no evidence of a major change in earnings consistent with a decline in returns to a university education, or a shift in demand favouring specific degrees.

    Release date: 2003-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003007
    Description:

    This report presents information collected by the new Postsecondary Education Participation Survey (PEPS) on three themes: access, persistence and financing.

    Release date: 2003-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003006
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to identify three pathways taken by high school graduates by the time they are 20 years old and to examine the factors related to one pathway versus another. The three pathways consist of participation in postsecondary education right after high school, delayed post-secondary participation, and non-participation in postsecondary education. The young people who took these pathways are referred to as right-awayers, delayers and no-goers, respectively.

    The data were analysed in two phases. The first phase was a descriptive analysis that compared delayers and no-goers with right-awayers, with respect to demographics and family-related, school-related and postsecondary financing factors. The second phase used separate logistic regression models to evaluate how the factors predicted that someone might be a delayer instead of a right-awayer, or a no-goer rather than a right-awayer.

    The study found that several factors were significant predictors of either delayed post-secondary education enrolment or non-enrolment in a post-secondary program.

    Release date: 2003-07-04

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-597-X
    Description:

    This paper provides a descriptive analysis of issues related to the access and use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) among Canadian youth. In particular, this research examines the extent to which inequities in the use and access of ICT exist among Canadian high school students, based on gender, socio-economic status and rural-urban location. Three datasets have been used to study this issue: the Canadian portion of the Second International Technology in Education Study (SITES), an international survey which measures schools' use of technological resources; the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), which was conducted in conjunction with the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA); and Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS), which focusses specifically on issues related to ICT access and use.The results of these analyses suggest that there is a 'digital divide' among Canadian youth, in terms of access to and experience with ICT. Rural youth are less likely to have access to computers in the home; however, frequency of use and perceived competency levels are not compromised by this trend. Female youth and those from families with low levels of parental education are also less likely to have access to computers in their homes. These groups tend to spend less time on the computer and report lower levels of computer skills competency.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002005
    Description:

    The educational attainment of Canadians has risen considerably over the last two decades. The average years of schooling of the population aged 25 to 54 has grown from 11.8 years in 1981 to 13.3 years in 1996. Yet it is generally perceived that spatial disparities in educational attainment remain substantial. This bulletin investigates the spatial patterns in educational attainment and how they have changed since 1981. A better understanding of subprovincial patterns and trends can support federal and provincial policy making in this area of concern.

    Release date: 2003-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020026526
    Description:

    This study examines the labour market outcomes of university and college graduates who entered the work force at three points of the economic cycle: 1986, 1990 and 1995. It uses data from the National Graduates Survey.

    Release date: 2003-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020026524
    Description:

    This study examines universities' responses to reductions in government funding and changes in operating revenue and expenditures over the past 15 years, using the Financial Information of Universities and Colleges Survey.

    Release date: 2003-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020026525
    Description:

    This report discusses the methodology for the development of two school engagement scales using items from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) teachers' questionnaire.

    Release date: 2003-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016530
    Description:

    This study looks at Canadian 15-year-old students' use of information and communication technologies at home and at school.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003201
    Description:

    Previous research suggests that high-school students living beyond commuting distance from a university are far less likely to attend, especially if they are from a lower-income family. This study asks three follow-up questions. First, do students who live too far to attend university 'make-up' for this disadvantage by attending college (if one is nearby)? Second, how does this uptake in college participation differ by class of income? And finally, does distance to school deter students from attending college?

    After controlling for various factors associated with postsecondary participation, including sex, province, family income, and parental education, students living near a college are more likely to attend college than those students living near both a university and a college. The magnitude of this uptake in college participation almost completely counterbalances the difference in university participation, yielding similar postsecondary participation rates between the two groups. It was found that the uptake in college participation in outlying areas mainly occurs within groups of students who are from lower- and middle-income families, and who live far away from universities. Although there are very few students living beyond commuting distance from a college, research has shown that these students are far less likely to attend college, especially if they are from a lower-income family.

    Release date: 2003-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003005
    Description:

    This paper develops technical procedures that may enable ministries of education to link provincial tests with national and international tests in order to compare standards and report results on a common scale.

    Release date: 2003-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003004
    Description:

    This study investigates the link between having a job in high school and quitting school. It uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS).

    Release date: 2003-05-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 96F0030X
    Description:

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Daily in the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2003005
    Description:

    This paper studies the determinants of worker and workplace participation in training. It also present an analysis of the proportion of employees trained to evaluate the level of commitment of the employer to training.

    Release date: 2003-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046499
    Description:

    This article examines what happens to the time use of young people when they add a job to their daily schedule.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

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