Statistics by subject – Education, training and learning

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  • Articles and reports: 81-590-X2004001
    Description:

    The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a collaborative effort among member countries of the OECD, designed to assess, on a regular basis, the achievement of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy through a common international test.

    This report provides results from the PISA 2003 assessment of student performance in mathematics, reading, science and problem solving at the provincial level, and compares the achievement of Canadian students to that of students internationally. PISA 2003 has a special focus on mathematical literacy.

    Forty-one countries participated in PISA 2003, including all 30 OECD countries and 11 non-OECD countries. About 28,000 15-year-olds from more than 1,000 schools took part in Canada.

    Release date: 2004-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004234
    Description:

    This article analyses the relationship between the quality of education that immigrants received in their home country, as measured by international test scores, and their success in the Canadian labour market.

    Release date: 2004-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040057736
    Description:

    This article summarizes the results of the 2003 Programme for International Assessment, providing international comparisons of student performance in mathematics, reading, science and problem-solving.

    Release date: 2004-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040057737
    Description:

    Drawing on data from the 1997 and the 2003 Adult Education and Training Survey, this article compares participation in adult education and training in Canada, by gender, age and education.

    Release date: 2004-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040037735
    Description:

    This article examines the variation between Canada's provinces in the literacy skills of 15-year-old students using data from the 2000 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). It also looks at family background and school factors as potential explanations for these differences. The article has been adapted from Variation in literacy skills among Canadian provinces: Findings from the OECD PISA, Education, Skills and Learning Research Papers, no. 12 (Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 81-595-MIE2004012).

    Release date: 2004-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004235
    Description:

    This paper reports the results of an empirical analysis of the gender earnings gap among recent Canadian bachelor-level university graduates. Hours of work are the single most important influence on the gap; past work experience, job characteristics, family status, province of residence, and language have smaller and more mixed effects.

    Release date: 2004-11-30

  • Index and guides: 92-392-G
    Description:

    This guide presents the census concepts related to schooling and major field of study and describes the evolution of the different issues that concern these concepts. The guide also deals with the comparability of the 2001 Census data on schooling and major field of study with those of previous censuses.

    Release date: 2004-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004026
    Description:

    This report examines factors related to entering college or university as well as to leaving postsecondary education prior to completion.

    Release date: 2004-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040047422
    Description:

    This article examines recent evidence on the academic performance of children of people who immigrated to Canada during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040047423
    Description:

    This article reviews the evidence on the existence of a gender gap in these education indicators: literacy test results, high school drop-out rates and the proportion of each sex enrolled in full-time undergraduate studies.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037428
    Description:

    A new Statistics Canada survey will provide current indicators of post-graduation plans of recent doctorate recipients. Previously, graduates were surveyed only three years after graduation: by then, some had moved out of the country or had gone through several career changes.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004233
    Description:

    In Canada's federal system for economic (skilled) class immigrant selection, education is treated as if it is homogeneous and only differs in quantity. Some provinces, however, differentiate based on postsecondary field of study. This study explores the economic implications of field of study for each sex, and for two subgroups of immigrants, those educated in Canada and those educated elsewhere .

    Field of study is not observed to explain much of the earnings difference between immigrants and the Canadian born, though it is relatively more important for males than females in doing so. Interestingly, while there are a few exceptions, a general pattern is observed whereby the differences between high- and low-earning fields are not as large for immigrants as for the Canadian born. Similarly, social assistance receipt has smaller variance across fields for immigrants than for the Canadian born. Nevertheless, substantial inter-field differences are observed for each immigrant group.

    Release date: 2004-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004017
    Description:

    With the help of data from the censuses of 1981 through 2001, this study examines the evolution of employment incomes (expressed in 2001 constant dollars) of less educated couples and highly educated couples.

    Release date: 2004-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004230
    Description:

    This study explores the labour market performance of low and high educated couples using Census data for the period 1980 to 2000.

    Release date: 2004-10-13

  • Index and guides: 62-560-X
    Description:

    This teacher's kit helps students understand how the Consumer Price Index (CPI) reflects price changes for the goods and services they buy.

    The Custom Inflation Simulator is a Web-based resource that demonstrates how the many consumer goods and services in the 'basket' are used to calculate the CPI, and how consumption patterns differ from person to person. Using the simulator, students can also see the effect of individual price increases on overall inflation, in other words how each item in the basket is 'weighted' to reflect its importance in Canadians' consumption patterns.

    Release date: 2004-10-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004232
    Description:

    This study extends previous work on the evolution of the education premium, and investigates the existence of diverging university/high school earnings ratio trends across industries in the knowledge-based economy. The study also discusses the changing demand for high-skilled workers by comparing relative wages of university graduates holding degrees in "applied" fields to those of other university graduates (the "field" premium).

    Release date: 2004-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2004011
    Description:

    This paper provides key indicators of connectedness for Canada's elementary and secondary schools using data from the Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey.

    Release date: 2004-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410713123
    Description:

    This study looks at the decision of parents to save, and amounts saved, for the future education of children aged under 19 years in 2002. A model is used to estimate cumulative parental savings, taking into consideration characteristics of the family and the child, aspirations and involvement of parents, awareness of saving incentive programs, and expectations about grant programs.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040027003
    Description:

    This article compares the reading achievement of Canadian 15-year-olds enrolled in immersion and non-immersion programs in English-language school systems in the 10 provinces.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040027005
    Description:

    Postsecondary students finance their education in a variety of ways, including employment income, savings, family support, scholarships, and loans from government and private sources. This Canadian Social Trends article discusses student loans: not the most frequently used form of financial support for students, but an important source for those who do borrow.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016740
    Description:

    Controlling for differences in student populations, we examine the contribution of schools to provincial differences in the reading, math and science achievement of 15-year-olds in this paper. Using a semi-parametric decomposition technique developed by DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (1996) for differences in distributions, we find that school differences contribute to provincial differences in different parts of the achievement distribution and that the effect varies by province and by type of skill, even within province. For example, school differences account for about 32% of the difference in mean reading achievement between New Brunswick and Alberta, but reduce the difference in the proportion of students performing at the lowest reading proficiency level. By contrast, school differences account for 94% of the New Brunswick-Alberta gap in the 10th percentile of the science distribution. Our results demonstrate that school effectiveness studies that focus on the first moment of the achievement distribution miss potentially important impacts for specific students.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016726
    Description:

    Although the use of school vouchers is growing in the developing world, the impact of vouchers is an open question. Any sort of long-term assessment of this activity is rare. This paper estimates the long-term effect of Colombia's PACES program, which provided over 125,000 poor children with vouchers that covered half the cost of private secondary school.

    The PACES program presents an unusual opportunity to assess the effect of demand-side education financing in a Latin American country where private schools educate a substantial proportion of pupils. The program is of special interest because many vouchers were assigned by lottery, so program effects can be reliably assessed.

    We use administrative records to assess the long-term impact of PACES vouchers on high school graduation status and test scores. The principal advantage of administrative records is that there is no loss-to-follow-up and the data are much cheaper than a costly and potentially dangerous survey effort. On the other hand, individual ID numbers may be inaccurate, complicating record linkage, and selection bias contaminates the sample of test-takers. We discuss solutions to these problems. The results suggest that the program increased secondary school completion rates, and that college-entrance test scores were higher for lottery winners than losers.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040037018
    Description:

    The past decade has seen rising costs associated with postsecondary education. Drawing on data from the Postsecondary Education Participation Survey, conducted in February and March 2002, this article examines: trends in tuition fees; annual expenditures of students in college or university for tuition, living costs and other expenses; and sources of financing relied on by students to cover costs for the 2001-2002 academic year.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040037017
    Description:

    Drawing on data from the 2003-2004 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey, this article reports on computer and technology access and use in Canadian schools. Information is provided on student-to-computer ratios, technology applications that are available to students, and principals' assessments of the extent to which teachers have the technical skills to use computer technologies for administrative purposes and for effectively incorporating computer technology into teaching practices.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004022
    Description:

    This report provides trends on public school enrolments, educators and expenditures. It uses figures provided by provincial and territorial departments of education on public elementary and secondary schools.

    Release date: 2004-09-08

Data (17)

Data (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Table: 89-597-X
    Description:

    This article presents information on health, education and language for Métis, Inuit and North American Indian children living in non-reserve areas. It uses the 'children and youth' component of the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS).

    Release date: 2004-07-09

  • Public use microdata: 81M0013X
    Description:

    The Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) is Canada's most comprehensive source of data on individual participation in formal adult education and training. It is the only Canadian survey to collect detailed information about the skill development efforts of the entire adult Canadian population. The AETS provides information about the main subject of training activities, their provider, duration and the sources and types of support for training. Furthermore, the AETS allows for the examination of the socio-economic and demographic profiles of both training participants and non-participants. This survey also identifies barriers faced by individuals who wish to take some form of training but cannot. The AETS was administered three times during the 1990s, in 1992, 1994 and 1998, as a supplement to the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    The content of the AETS was revised to take into account recommendations coming from consultation exercises. As a result, more than half of the 2003 survey is made up of new questions and the target population has been modified.

    The main objectives are:1) To measure the incidence and intensity of adults' participation in job-related formal training.2) To profile employer support to job-related formal training.3) To analyze the aspects of job-related training activities such as: training provider, expenses, financial support, motivations, outcomes and difficulties experienced while training.4) To identify the barriers preventing individuals from participating in the job-related formal training they want or need to take.5) To identify reasons explaining adults' lack of participation and of interest in job-related formal training.6) To relate adults' current participation patterns to their past involvement in and plans about future participation in job-related training.7) To measure the incidence and frequency of adults' participation in job-related informal training.8) To examine the interactions between participation in formal and informal job-related training.

    The population covered by the AETS consists of Canadians 25 years of age and older. This is a change from the population previously targeted by the AETS, which consisted of Canadians aged 17 years of age and older. A primary consideration for this change was the practical difficulties in applying the definition of adult education to individuals in the 17 to 24 years of age group. By definition, adult education excludes students who are still involved in their first or initial stage of schooling. As previous AETS did not precisely identify students still in their initial stage of schooling, analyses using these data had to rely on an ad hoc definition of adult learners. According to this definition, individuals aged 17 to 24 who were not in one of the following situations were excluded from the analysis: full-time students subsidized by an employer and full-time students over 19 enrolled in elementary or secondary programs.

    Release date: 2004-05-27

  • Table: 95F0380X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Paid work,' which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups. These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography. It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 95F0381X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Canada's workforce: Paid work,' which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups. These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography. It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 97F0017X2001008
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling,' which presents data on school attendance, the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    'School attendance' refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period from September 2000 to May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits toward a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97F0017XIE2001008.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0022X2001040
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Religions in Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution of religions in Canada.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0022XIE2001040.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0022X2001041
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Religions in Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution of religions in Canada.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0022XIE2001041.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0013X2001041
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Work force: Unpaid Work," which shows 2001 Census data on the unpaid work of the Canadian workforce, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians.

    This information can be used to study that part of the population whose main activity is unpaid household work; to analyze the division of household work between men and women; to better understand the contribution of men and women to the economy; to evaluate the capacity of the unpaid sector to absorb care-giving responsibilities no longer provided by the paid sector; and to analyze how workers balance their job and household responsibilities.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0013XIE2001041.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0013X2001049
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Canada's Work force: Unpaid work,' which shows 2001 Census data on the unpaid work of the Canadian work force, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians.

    This information can be used to study that part of the population whose main activity is unpaid household work; to analyse the division of household work between men and women; to better understand the contribution of men and women to the economy; to evaluate the capacity of the unpaid sector to absorb care-giving responsibilities no longer provided by the paid sector; and to analyse how workers balance their job and household responsibilities.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97F0013XIE2001049.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0013X2001050
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Canada's Work force: Unpaid work,' which shows 2001 Census data on the unpaid work of the Canadian work force, including unpaid household work, unpaid child care and unpaid senior care. These data, together with information on paid work, provide a more complete picture of the work activities of all Canadians.

    This information can be used to study that part of the population whose main activity is unpaid household work; to analyse the division of household work between men and women; to better understand the contribution of men and women to the economy; to evaluate the capacity of the unpaid sector to absorb care-giving responsibilities no longer provided by the paid sector; and to analyse how workers balance their job and household responsibilities.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97F0013XIE2001050.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0012X2001048
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyze labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing for comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0012XIE2001048.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0011X2001058
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Aboriginal Peoples of Canada,' which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey .

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97F0011XIE2001058.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0011X2001059
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Aboriginal Peoples of Canada,' which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey .

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97F0011XIE2001059.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0012X2001050
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyze labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing for comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0012XIE2001050.

    Release date: 2004-03-16

  • Table: 97F0012X2001046
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyze labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing for comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0012XIE2001046.

    Release date: 2004-03-16

  • Table: 97F0012X2001047
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyze labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing for comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0012XIE2001047.

    Release date: 2004-03-16

  • Table: 97F0024X2001016
    Description:

    These data tables present selected variables from the 2001 Census according to the statistical area classification (SAC). The tables allow the user to perform simple rank and sort functions. Data are presented for Canada, provinces and territories.

    The SAC groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ) or of the territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes.

    Release date: 2004-02-27

Analysis (39)

Analysis (39) (25 of 39 results)

Reference (6)

Reference (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Index and guides: 92-392-G
    Description:

    This guide presents the census concepts related to schooling and major field of study and describes the evolution of the different issues that concern these concepts. The guide also deals with the comparability of the 2001 Census data on schooling and major field of study with those of previous censuses.

    Release date: 2004-11-23

  • Index and guides: 62-560-X
    Description:

    This teacher's kit helps students understand how the Consumer Price Index (CPI) reflects price changes for the goods and services they buy.

    The Custom Inflation Simulator is a Web-based resource that demonstrates how the many consumer goods and services in the 'basket' are used to calculate the CPI, and how consumption patterns differ from person to person. Using the simulator, students can also see the effect of individual price increases on overall inflation, in other words how each item in the basket is 'weighted' to reflect its importance in Canadians' consumption patterns.

    Release date: 2004-10-01

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016740
    Description:

    Controlling for differences in student populations, we examine the contribution of schools to provincial differences in the reading, math and science achievement of 15-year-olds in this paper. Using a semi-parametric decomposition technique developed by DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (1996) for differences in distributions, we find that school differences contribute to provincial differences in different parts of the achievement distribution and that the effect varies by province and by type of skill, even within province. For example, school differences account for about 32% of the difference in mean reading achievement between New Brunswick and Alberta, but reduce the difference in the proportion of students performing at the lowest reading proficiency level. By contrast, school differences account for 94% of the New Brunswick-Alberta gap in the 10th percentile of the science distribution. Our results demonstrate that school effectiveness studies that focus on the first moment of the achievement distribution miss potentially important impacts for specific students.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016726
    Description:

    Although the use of school vouchers is growing in the developing world, the impact of vouchers is an open question. Any sort of long-term assessment of this activity is rare. This paper estimates the long-term effect of Colombia's PACES program, which provided over 125,000 poor children with vouchers that covered half the cost of private secondary school.

    The PACES program presents an unusual opportunity to assess the effect of demand-side education financing in a Latin American country where private schools educate a substantial proportion of pupils. The program is of special interest because many vouchers were assigned by lottery, so program effects can be reliably assessed.

    We use administrative records to assess the long-term impact of PACES vouchers on high school graduation status and test scores. The principal advantage of administrative records is that there is no loss-to-follow-up and the data are much cheaper than a costly and potentially dangerous survey effort. On the other hand, individual ID numbers may be inaccurate, complicating record linkage, and selection bias contaminates the sample of test-takers. We discuss solutions to these problems. The results suggest that the program increased secondary school completion rates, and that college-entrance test scores were higher for lottery winners than losers.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2004003
    Description:

    This study profiles Canadian workers with low weekly earnings in their main job in 1996 and examines their upward mobility in 2001, using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2004-03-26

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2004067
    Description:

    This paper assesses the degree of spatial diversity exhibited across Canada by using 1996 Census of Population data, aggregated at the census division (CD) level. The approach taken in this research adopts a broad territorial focus, is exploratory in nature and emphasizes territorial performance in a comparative context.

    The study is based on a range of commonly used and understood demographic, social and economic variables. A factor analysis was conducted in order to identify underlying dimensions that characterize each CD across Canada. The factor analysis resulted in six factors, each of which provides a profile of the CDs on a number of key attributes.

    The research is primarily descriptive and will be of interest to a broad audience. It can be used to facilitate the diffusion of baseline data to a wide range of stakeholders, stimulate discussion on spatial diversity at the subprovincial level and enhance the debate on potential alternative development paths for each region. Note that this research is, in turn, constrained by the nature of the data available. The analysis is also static and focussed on a cross-section. The causes of the observed diversity are not explicitly accounted for in the study.

    Release date: 2004-03-17

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