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All (42)

All (42) (25 of 42 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050048984
    Description:

    This article uses Labour Force Survey data for the 1990-1991 to 2004-2005 school years to examine trends in the high school drop-out rate for Canada and the provinces, for males compared to and females and for census metropolitan areas compared to rural areas. A high school drop-out is defined as the share of 20-to-24-year-olds who are not attending school and who have not graduated from high school.

    Release date: 2005-12-16

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005019
    Description:

    This publication is an explanation of the estimation procedures used to calculate 2003-2004 research and development (R&D) expenditures in the higher education sector. This estimation procedure was revised in 2000 as R&D activities in the higher education sector have increased in importance to policy developers, major funders of these activities, and also to the performing institutions themselves. In 2003-2004 the R&D expenditures for higher education were estimated to total $8.1 billion, an increase of 9% over 2002-2003 revised estimates.

    Release date: 2005-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038966
    Description:

    Studies of the postsecondary attainment of young adults are informative, but it is also useful to examine the educational aspirations of teenagers. Such studies profile the value placed on different types of formal education by youth as well as perceived opportunities for upward occupational mobility. This article explores the educational aspirations of 15-year-old visible minority immigrant students and compares them with those of Canadian-born youth who are not part of a visible minority group. It then identifies the most important factors that explain the large ethnocultural differences in university aspirations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2005012
    Description:

    This paper investigates relationships between adult literacy skills and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs). Using the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), it becomes possible to compare respondents' ICT use, based on self-assessed ICT use patterns and attitudes toward computers, with literacy skills and a number of socio-demographic characteristics, including age, gender and educational attainment. The paper offers data for Canada, its provinces and territories, as well as five other countries (Bermuda, the United States, Italy, Norway and Switzerland), allowing international and inter-provincial comparisons. An important objective of the paper is to examine outcomes associated with literacy skills in combination with patterns of ICT use, and this is achieved by profiling these characteristics and studying their relationships with respondent income. In addition, it offers a portrait of adults' computer and Internet use, including purposes of use, attitudes toward computers, and use of other ICTs, and analyzes such use, with a detailed focus on Canada.

    Patterns of Internet and computer access confirm the existence of "digital divides" both within and between nations. Apart from Italy, differences between the countries included in this study are not large. However, as found elsewhere, large divides exist within countries when examining respondents grouped by their level of income. In Canada, the Western provinces, the territories, and Ontario emerge as leaders in ICT use, although regional patterns are complex and vary depending on the specific technology examined.

    Many other factors are also strongly associated with respondents' ICT use. Age, gender, educational attainment, and level of literacy proficiency help predict whether a respondent is a "high-intensity" computer user. A significant decline in ICT use is found to occur after age 45 in all countries. The findings for ICT use by gender, however, were mixed. In the European countries included in this study (Italy, Norway and Switzerland), clear gender differences emerge but no such gap exists in North America. Respondents with less than upper-secondary education are significantly less likely to use computers for a range of purposes, and this pattern is most pronounced in Italy and Bermuda. In addition, scales that measure individuals' use of computers and the Internet, and attitudes toward computers, tend to increase with the literacy proficiency of respondents.

    Finally, literacy and computer use profiles are strongly related to the likelihood that respondents have high earnings. In most countries included in this study, adults who have average or higher literacy skills and who are intensive computer users have about three to six times the odds of being in the top quartile of personal income, compared to respondents with below average literacy skills and less intensive computer use.

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005271
    Description:

    The age distributions of professors at Canadian universities without mandatory retirement and those at universities with mandatory retirement at age 65 have diverged over time with a higher fraction of professors over the age of 65 being at universities without mandatory retirement. An analysis of a discrete time hazard model indicates that faculty members at universities with mandatory retirement at age 65 have exit rates at age 65 that are 30 to 35 percentage points higher than those of their counterparts at universities without mandatory retirement. Similar results are found for both men and women; however, the magnitude of this effect is somewhat smaller for women. This does not support the view that mandatory retirement is a more severe constraint on the behaviour of female academics

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-617-X
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey, undertaken in 2003, measured the proficiencies of a representative sample of Canadian adults aged 16 and over in four domains: prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving, and benchmarked performance against an international standard. The proficiency scores are compared between provinces, territories and nations, and over time. Moreover, literacy performance is examined in relation to differences in variables such as educational attainment, employment and unemployment, earnings and self-assessed health. Analyses of the literacy performance of groups of special interest, including women and men, young adults and seniors, recent and established immigrants, and Aboriginal populations are included.

    Release date: 2005-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005035
    Description:

    Potential shortages in specific trades and specific areas of the country are forecast for the coming years in Canada. One particular aspect being examined is the perceived low completion rates of Registered Apprentices (RA). This pilot study follows a longitudinal cohort of registered apprentices, who first started their programs in 1992, over a period of 11 years. The report discusses the quality of, and gaps in, current administrative data available to measure completion rates. Finally, it presents methodological work to highlight pros and cons of different approaches to calculating a completion rate.

    Release date: 2005-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005270
    Description:

    This paper adopts the decomposition technique of DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (DFL, 1996) to decompose provincial differences in the distribution of Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) test scores and assesses the relative contribution of provincial differences in the distribution of "class size" and time-in-term, other school factors and student background factors. Class size and time-in-term are both important school choice variables and we examine how provincial achievement differences would change if the Alberta distribution of class size and time-in-term prevailed in the other provinces. Results differ by province, and for provinces where mean achievement gaps would be lower, not all students would benefit.

    Release date: 2005-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038765
    Description:

    The international mobility of highly-qualified workers has never been higher and shows no signs of slowing. In fact, although the mix of graduates appears to be different, the US and Canada are losing similar proportions of their doctoral graduates. The analysis focuses on the demographic and educational characteristics of doctoral graduates, how they financed their education, as well as their plans for further study, employment and where they intend to live in the period immediately following graduation.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005036
    Description:

    This report builds on previous research examining the role of family income in postsecondary education. The paper attempts to address three broad questions using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). First, has the postsecondary education participation pattern changed in the recent past either for college and university participation, or for youth of various backgrounds? Second, how are the socio-economic factors related to postsecondary participation? Does the impact of socio-economic factors differ for college and university participation? Thirdly, for those who did pursue postsecondary education, which factors are more important in the choice of institution - university versus college?

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005263
    Description:

    Previous studies investigating the role of rising tuition fees in university enrolment by socio-economic background have focused on the fee changes registered among undergraduate programs over the 1990s. Over this period, no changes in enrolment patterns were observed, possibly because the tuition fee increases were small in absolute terms and gradual. This study examines the impact of a very large and sudden deregulation of tuition fees in Ontario professional programs in the late 1990s. The findings suggest that the enrolment gap between students from higher and lower socio-economic backgrounds rose substantially in Ontario, where the deregulation of professional programs was more prominent. In provinces like Quebec and British Columbia, where tuition fees remained stable, no change in the enrolment gap was registered.

    Release date: 2005-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005264
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: The impact of tuition fees on university access: Evidence from a large-scale price deregulation in professional programs.

    Release date: 2005-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050038611
    Description:

    This article reports on results from the 2003 Survey of Earned Doctorates, providing information on the labour market plans of graduates, how doctoral candidates fund their graduate studies, how much time was required to complete a doctoral degree as well as basic data on the demographic characteristics of the graduates.

    Release date: 2005-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050038612
    Description:

    Drawing on data from the Census and from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this article examines the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the Aboriginal population residing in selected CMAs over the 1981 to 2001 period. The focus is on trends in educational attainment among the Aboriginal population and how those trends compare to those observed for the non-Aboriginal population.

    Release date: 2005-09-07

  • Index and guides: 92-133-X
    Description:

    This report describes changes planned for the 2006 Census education questions. Education questions are a part of the Form 2B (the long form) of the census. This form is completed by 20% of all households. These changes were tested in the May 2004 Census test of over 300,000 households. The changes aim to address data limitations in the 2001 Census questions and to enhance their relevance to education studies by allowing a better reflection of the range of educational pathways taken by Canadians. The report includes an explanation of the reasons for modifying the 2006 Census education content, a detailed look at each of the changes, and a discussion on historical consistency.

    Release date: 2005-08-31

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030028448
    Description:

    This profile gives provincial level information on the presence of teacher-librarians, library technicians and other library staff in Canadian schools.

    Release date: 2005-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005034
    Description:

    This report presents information on the information and communications technologies (ICT) infrastructure and reach in all responding First Nations schools in Canada. It uses data from the 2003/04 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey.

    Release date: 2005-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005033
    Description:

    The private, for-profit Education Services sector plays a key role in developing the knowledge and skills of the Canadian labour force. As awareness of the importance of lifelong learning has increased, so has interest in the contribution of private, for-profit Education Services to increasing skills and knowledge, productivity, innovation and competitiveness.

    Little statistical information, from either the supply or demand side of the Educational Services sector, is available in Canada. Several federal and provincial ministries, academic researchers and industry participants have expressed a need for more comprehensive statistical information on the sector. As the national statistical agency, Statistics Canada has an interest in filling these information needs.

    This report provides an overview of the Education Services sector in Canada. Drawing on available sources of statistical information, it also looks at whether it is possible to shed light on the size and characteristics of the private, for-profit Education Services sector.

    The study was funded by the Policy Research Initiative.

    Release date: 2005-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005032
    Description:

    This report presents information about doctoral degree recipients who graduated from Canadian universities between July 1, 2003 and June 30, 2004 as collected by the Survey of Earned Doctorates. The analysis focuses on the demographic and educational characteristics of doctoral graduates, how they financed their education, as well as their plans for further study, employment and where they intend to live in the period immediately following graduation.

    Release date: 2005-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050028050
    Description:

    Drawing on the 2003 Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey, this article compares literacy score levels by educational attainment and by age. The research shows that individuals who have completed college or university not only begin their working lives with higher skill levels, they also maintain those skills at a high level into their advanced years.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050028051
    Description:

    This article draws on the 2003-2004 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey to examine the contributions of teacher-librarians in Canadian elementary and secondary schools as a learning resource for both students and for their fellow teachers.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005031
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the final set of tables which contain salary information for the year 2003-2004. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2005-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005030
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information for the year 2004-2005. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded quickly to the survey. This information is collected annually under the "University and College Academic Staff Survey" and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2005-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005251
    Description:

    Compulsory school laws have existed in Canada for more than a hundred years, and policies to mandate further education continue to be discussed. This paper examines the impact of these laws on education attainment and on subsequent social economic outcomes for individuals compelled to stay in school. The findings indicate that mandating education substantially increased adult income and substantially decreased the likelihood of being below the low income cut-off, unemployed, and in a manual occupation. Considering possible costs incurred while attending school, these findings suggest compulsory schooling legislation was effective in generating large lifetime gains to would-be-dropouts.

    Release date: 2005-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005029
    Description:

    The system of postsecondary education in Manitoba plays an important role in the social and economic health of the province. Colleges and universities strive to meet the lifelong learning needs of Manitobans and to ensure the availability of individuals with the right skills to support a growing and changing economy.

    This report uses data from the National Graduates Survey (Class of 2000) and asks who are the graduates of Manitoba's universities and colleges, what do they do after graduation, and how well do they integrate into the labour market? In particular, the report provides a portrait of the graduates from Manitoba's postsecondary institutions, analyses the mobility of students and graduates into and out of the province, looks at graduates' outcomes in the work force, and examines the student debt load of graduates. In addition, the report includes a special analysis of Aboriginal graduates.

    Release date: 2005-05-18

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Public use microdata: 81M0017X
    Description:

    The Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), conducted and developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, provides detailed information about approaches to educational planning in Canada. The survey provides information on how parents are involved with their children's education, their hopes and plans for their children's postsecondary education, how they expect to pay for their children's postsecondary education and their current education savings.

    Release date: 2005-02-03

Analysis (37)

Analysis (37) (25 of 37 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050048984
    Description:

    This article uses Labour Force Survey data for the 1990-1991 to 2004-2005 school years to examine trends in the high school drop-out rate for Canada and the provinces, for males compared to and females and for census metropolitan areas compared to rural areas. A high school drop-out is defined as the share of 20-to-24-year-olds who are not attending school and who have not graduated from high school.

    Release date: 2005-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038966
    Description:

    Studies of the postsecondary attainment of young adults are informative, but it is also useful to examine the educational aspirations of teenagers. Such studies profile the value placed on different types of formal education by youth as well as perceived opportunities for upward occupational mobility. This article explores the educational aspirations of 15-year-old visible minority immigrant students and compares them with those of Canadian-born youth who are not part of a visible minority group. It then identifies the most important factors that explain the large ethnocultural differences in university aspirations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2005012
    Description:

    This paper investigates relationships between adult literacy skills and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs). Using the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), it becomes possible to compare respondents' ICT use, based on self-assessed ICT use patterns and attitudes toward computers, with literacy skills and a number of socio-demographic characteristics, including age, gender and educational attainment. The paper offers data for Canada, its provinces and territories, as well as five other countries (Bermuda, the United States, Italy, Norway and Switzerland), allowing international and inter-provincial comparisons. An important objective of the paper is to examine outcomes associated with literacy skills in combination with patterns of ICT use, and this is achieved by profiling these characteristics and studying their relationships with respondent income. In addition, it offers a portrait of adults' computer and Internet use, including purposes of use, attitudes toward computers, and use of other ICTs, and analyzes such use, with a detailed focus on Canada.

    Patterns of Internet and computer access confirm the existence of "digital divides" both within and between nations. Apart from Italy, differences between the countries included in this study are not large. However, as found elsewhere, large divides exist within countries when examining respondents grouped by their level of income. In Canada, the Western provinces, the territories, and Ontario emerge as leaders in ICT use, although regional patterns are complex and vary depending on the specific technology examined.

    Many other factors are also strongly associated with respondents' ICT use. Age, gender, educational attainment, and level of literacy proficiency help predict whether a respondent is a "high-intensity" computer user. A significant decline in ICT use is found to occur after age 45 in all countries. The findings for ICT use by gender, however, were mixed. In the European countries included in this study (Italy, Norway and Switzerland), clear gender differences emerge but no such gap exists in North America. Respondents with less than upper-secondary education are significantly less likely to use computers for a range of purposes, and this pattern is most pronounced in Italy and Bermuda. In addition, scales that measure individuals' use of computers and the Internet, and attitudes toward computers, tend to increase with the literacy proficiency of respondents.

    Finally, literacy and computer use profiles are strongly related to the likelihood that respondents have high earnings. In most countries included in this study, adults who have average or higher literacy skills and who are intensive computer users have about three to six times the odds of being in the top quartile of personal income, compared to respondents with below average literacy skills and less intensive computer use.

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005271
    Description:

    The age distributions of professors at Canadian universities without mandatory retirement and those at universities with mandatory retirement at age 65 have diverged over time with a higher fraction of professors over the age of 65 being at universities without mandatory retirement. An analysis of a discrete time hazard model indicates that faculty members at universities with mandatory retirement at age 65 have exit rates at age 65 that are 30 to 35 percentage points higher than those of their counterparts at universities without mandatory retirement. Similar results are found for both men and women; however, the magnitude of this effect is somewhat smaller for women. This does not support the view that mandatory retirement is a more severe constraint on the behaviour of female academics

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-617-X
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey, undertaken in 2003, measured the proficiencies of a representative sample of Canadian adults aged 16 and over in four domains: prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving, and benchmarked performance against an international standard. The proficiency scores are compared between provinces, territories and nations, and over time. Moreover, literacy performance is examined in relation to differences in variables such as educational attainment, employment and unemployment, earnings and self-assessed health. Analyses of the literacy performance of groups of special interest, including women and men, young adults and seniors, recent and established immigrants, and Aboriginal populations are included.

    Release date: 2005-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005035
    Description:

    Potential shortages in specific trades and specific areas of the country are forecast for the coming years in Canada. One particular aspect being examined is the perceived low completion rates of Registered Apprentices (RA). This pilot study follows a longitudinal cohort of registered apprentices, who first started their programs in 1992, over a period of 11 years. The report discusses the quality of, and gaps in, current administrative data available to measure completion rates. Finally, it presents methodological work to highlight pros and cons of different approaches to calculating a completion rate.

    Release date: 2005-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005270
    Description:

    This paper adopts the decomposition technique of DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (DFL, 1996) to decompose provincial differences in the distribution of Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) test scores and assesses the relative contribution of provincial differences in the distribution of "class size" and time-in-term, other school factors and student background factors. Class size and time-in-term are both important school choice variables and we examine how provincial achievement differences would change if the Alberta distribution of class size and time-in-term prevailed in the other provinces. Results differ by province, and for provinces where mean achievement gaps would be lower, not all students would benefit.

    Release date: 2005-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038765
    Description:

    The international mobility of highly-qualified workers has never been higher and shows no signs of slowing. In fact, although the mix of graduates appears to be different, the US and Canada are losing similar proportions of their doctoral graduates. The analysis focuses on the demographic and educational characteristics of doctoral graduates, how they financed their education, as well as their plans for further study, employment and where they intend to live in the period immediately following graduation.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005036
    Description:

    This report builds on previous research examining the role of family income in postsecondary education. The paper attempts to address three broad questions using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). First, has the postsecondary education participation pattern changed in the recent past either for college and university participation, or for youth of various backgrounds? Second, how are the socio-economic factors related to postsecondary participation? Does the impact of socio-economic factors differ for college and university participation? Thirdly, for those who did pursue postsecondary education, which factors are more important in the choice of institution - university versus college?

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005263
    Description:

    Previous studies investigating the role of rising tuition fees in university enrolment by socio-economic background have focused on the fee changes registered among undergraduate programs over the 1990s. Over this period, no changes in enrolment patterns were observed, possibly because the tuition fee increases were small in absolute terms and gradual. This study examines the impact of a very large and sudden deregulation of tuition fees in Ontario professional programs in the late 1990s. The findings suggest that the enrolment gap between students from higher and lower socio-economic backgrounds rose substantially in Ontario, where the deregulation of professional programs was more prominent. In provinces like Quebec and British Columbia, where tuition fees remained stable, no change in the enrolment gap was registered.

    Release date: 2005-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005264
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: The impact of tuition fees on university access: Evidence from a large-scale price deregulation in professional programs.

    Release date: 2005-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050038611
    Description:

    This article reports on results from the 2003 Survey of Earned Doctorates, providing information on the labour market plans of graduates, how doctoral candidates fund their graduate studies, how much time was required to complete a doctoral degree as well as basic data on the demographic characteristics of the graduates.

    Release date: 2005-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050038612
    Description:

    Drawing on data from the Census and from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this article examines the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the Aboriginal population residing in selected CMAs over the 1981 to 2001 period. The focus is on trends in educational attainment among the Aboriginal population and how those trends compare to those observed for the non-Aboriginal population.

    Release date: 2005-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030028448
    Description:

    This profile gives provincial level information on the presence of teacher-librarians, library technicians and other library staff in Canadian schools.

    Release date: 2005-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005034
    Description:

    This report presents information on the information and communications technologies (ICT) infrastructure and reach in all responding First Nations schools in Canada. It uses data from the 2003/04 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey.

    Release date: 2005-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005033
    Description:

    The private, for-profit Education Services sector plays a key role in developing the knowledge and skills of the Canadian labour force. As awareness of the importance of lifelong learning has increased, so has interest in the contribution of private, for-profit Education Services to increasing skills and knowledge, productivity, innovation and competitiveness.

    Little statistical information, from either the supply or demand side of the Educational Services sector, is available in Canada. Several federal and provincial ministries, academic researchers and industry participants have expressed a need for more comprehensive statistical information on the sector. As the national statistical agency, Statistics Canada has an interest in filling these information needs.

    This report provides an overview of the Education Services sector in Canada. Drawing on available sources of statistical information, it also looks at whether it is possible to shed light on the size and characteristics of the private, for-profit Education Services sector.

    The study was funded by the Policy Research Initiative.

    Release date: 2005-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005032
    Description:

    This report presents information about doctoral degree recipients who graduated from Canadian universities between July 1, 2003 and June 30, 2004 as collected by the Survey of Earned Doctorates. The analysis focuses on the demographic and educational characteristics of doctoral graduates, how they financed their education, as well as their plans for further study, employment and where they intend to live in the period immediately following graduation.

    Release date: 2005-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050028050
    Description:

    Drawing on the 2003 Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey, this article compares literacy score levels by educational attainment and by age. The research shows that individuals who have completed college or university not only begin their working lives with higher skill levels, they also maintain those skills at a high level into their advanced years.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050028051
    Description:

    This article draws on the 2003-2004 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey to examine the contributions of teacher-librarians in Canadian elementary and secondary schools as a learning resource for both students and for their fellow teachers.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005031
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the final set of tables which contain salary information for the year 2003-2004. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2005-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005030
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information for the year 2004-2005. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded quickly to the survey. This information is collected annually under the "University and College Academic Staff Survey" and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2005-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005251
    Description:

    Compulsory school laws have existed in Canada for more than a hundred years, and policies to mandate further education continue to be discussed. This paper examines the impact of these laws on education attainment and on subsequent social economic outcomes for individuals compelled to stay in school. The findings indicate that mandating education substantially increased adult income and substantially decreased the likelihood of being below the low income cut-off, unemployed, and in a manual occupation. Considering possible costs incurred while attending school, these findings suggest compulsory schooling legislation was effective in generating large lifetime gains to would-be-dropouts.

    Release date: 2005-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005029
    Description:

    The system of postsecondary education in Manitoba plays an important role in the social and economic health of the province. Colleges and universities strive to meet the lifelong learning needs of Manitobans and to ensure the availability of individuals with the right skills to support a growing and changing economy.

    This report uses data from the National Graduates Survey (Class of 2000) and asks who are the graduates of Manitoba's universities and colleges, what do they do after graduation, and how well do they integrate into the labour market? In particular, the report provides a portrait of the graduates from Manitoba's postsecondary institutions, analyses the mobility of students and graduates into and out of the province, looks at graduates' outcomes in the work force, and examines the student debt load of graduates. In addition, the report includes a special analysis of Aboriginal graduates.

    Release date: 2005-05-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-603-X
    Description:

    "Learning a living: First results of the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey" presents new evidence on the nature and magnitude of the literacy gaps faced by OECD countries and how these gaps have evolved over the medium term.

    The fundamental goal of the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) is to shed new light on the twin processes of skill gain and loss. The survey is sponsored by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

    The report offers new insights into the factors that influence the formation and loss of adult skills in various settings - at home and at work - for the seven countries participating in the first round of data collection. The study offers the first comparative evidence on the impact of formal adult education and informal learning on the supply of skill. It also provides unique insight into the distribution of information and communication technology skills, and how these have amplified both productivity and wage inequality.

    It is meant to assist decision makers in formulating policy in four areas:-Policies aimed at removing skill deficits that act as barriers to innovation, productivity and high rates of economic growth;-Policies designed to limit and reverse social exclusion and income inequality; -Policies that seek to reduce the unit cost of delivering public health care and education services;-Policies conceived to improve quality in all spheres, from public services to quality of life, individual fulfillment and happiness.

    Release date: 2005-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005028
    Description:

    This paper examines student-educator ratios and per-capita education expenditures within the context of the presence of a teacher-librarian. The presence of library staff such as teacher-librarians or library technicians is reviewed by province, on a per school and per student basis. In addition, the presence of school libraries in rural and urban schools and public versus private schools is considered.

    Release date: 2005-05-04

Reference (4)

Reference (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005019
    Description:

    This publication is an explanation of the estimation procedures used to calculate 2003-2004 research and development (R&D) expenditures in the higher education sector. This estimation procedure was revised in 2000 as R&D activities in the higher education sector have increased in importance to policy developers, major funders of these activities, and also to the performing institutions themselves. In 2003-2004 the R&D expenditures for higher education were estimated to total $8.1 billion, an increase of 9% over 2002-2003 revised estimates.

    Release date: 2005-12-07

  • Index and guides: 92-133-X
    Description:

    This report describes changes planned for the 2006 Census education questions. Education questions are a part of the Form 2B (the long form) of the census. This form is completed by 20% of all households. These changes were tested in the May 2004 Census test of over 300,000 households. The changes aim to address data limitations in the 2001 Census questions and to enhance their relevance to education studies by allowing a better reflection of the range of educational pathways taken by Canadians. The report includes an explanation of the reasons for modifying the 2006 Census education content, a detailed look at each of the changes, and a discussion on historical consistency.

    Release date: 2005-08-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20030017697
    Description:

    This paper outlines the two pillars of Statistics Canada's Education Outreach Program: an interactive website offering free online information, learning tools and resources specifically designed for the education community, and a network of education representatives in the regional offices providing expertise and support at a grassroots level.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20030017698
    Description:

    This paper reviews the implementation of the international CensusAtSchool and related projects. It emphasizes how to the involvement and support of various levels of government statistical services have contributed to the project's success.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

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