Statistics by subject – Education, training and learning

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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008317
    Description:

    This study estimates the effect of an additional year of schooling (Grade 10) on academic performance, with the particular aim of understanding the role of schooling in shaping the gender and income divides in academic performance. To identify the returns to schooling, the study takes advantage of a setting whereby standardized tests were administered to large samples of students of very close age, but who were in different school grades as a result of school-entry laws, thus creating a sharp discontinuity in school grades. The findings suggest that one additional year of high school (Grade 10) is associated with a large improvement in overall reading and mathematics performance, and that it had a smaller improvement in science performance. However, the improvements are not equally distributed: mathematics scores improve more for boys than for girls, and reading and science scores improve more for lower than for higher income youth. Most importantly, we find no evidence that girls or higher income youth benefit more from an additional year of high school in any test area. These findings suggest that the key to understanding the weaker academic performance of boys and lower income youth may lie in earlier school years, the home or at birth.

    Release date: 2008-11-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008070
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999. Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the first four cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2005 when they were 24 to 26 years of age.

    This report is a follow-up of a previous study of postsecondary participation (Shaienks and Gluszynski, 2007) which found that the overall postsecondary dropout rate was 15%. That rate however, differs across all types of institution and by demographic, family and school characteristics. This paper explores the impact of those characteristics on participation, graduation and dropping out of different types of postsecondary institution.

    Three new variables were developed to account for the type of institution attended by the student and the status in each of them. The university status, the college status and the other postsecondary status allow us to determine independently the outcome of participation in the different types of institution and profile graduates, continuers and especially drop outs according to their specific characteristics.

    Release date: 2008-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008069
    Description:

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral education covering annual data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) from each of the three years of the survey's existence (2003/2004, 2004/2005 and 2005/2006).

    The Survey of Earned Doctorates is a key source of information regarding the training of doctoral graduates in Canada. It provides information on the pathways of these highly qualified graduates through the education system and sheds light into the expectations of graduates as they transition into employment and postdoctoral education.

    In this 2005/2006 report, special attention has been given to the foreign born among the doctoral graduates. Foreign-born graduates represent more than one in every five graduates in the 2005/2006 academic year, and over half of all doctoral graduates living in Canada in 2006. Canada's immigration policy, with its emphasis on educational attainment, ensures that the foreign born will continue to account for a large proportion of Canada's doctorate degree holders. Furthermore, attracting foreign-born talent to Canada will be important if Canada is to increase the number of doctoral degree holders, since growth in the graduates from Canadian institutions has been minimal. One of the key challenges will be to retain graduates, both foreign-born and Canadian-born, in Canada upon the completion of their degree.

    Also unique to this third report, is the ability to discuss trends over the three years of survey data.

    Release date: 2008-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008068
    Description:

    Using major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education and training of Canadians, this publication presents a jurisdictional view of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands?

    As such, this report reveals some important information about what happens before, during and after health education. It focuses on interest in health occupations, the number of students taking and graduating from postsecondary health programs along with their socio-demographic characteristics and those of the faculty teaching these programs, the labour market experiences of recent graduates from these programs - including their mobility after graduation - as well as the ongoing participation of health workers in formal and informal training.

    Release date: 2008-10-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008316
    Description:

    We analyse the intergenerational education mobility of Canadian men and women born to immigrants. A detailed portrait of Canadians is offered, as are estimates of the degree of intergenerational mobility among the children of immigrants. Persistence in the years of schooling across the generations is rather weak between immigrants and their Canadian-born children, and one third as strong as for the general population. Parental earnings are not correlated with years of schooling for second-generation children and, if anything, are negatively correlated. Finally, we find that the intergenerational transmission of education has not changed across the birth cohorts of the post-war period.

    Release date: 2008-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008308
    Description:

    Using the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey, this article examines the group differences by national origin in university educational attainment among the children of immigrants in Canada. We found that children of immigrant parents in most source region groups achieve higher university completion rates than children of Canadian-born parents, partly due to higher education levels of their parents. Children of Chinese and Indian immigrants particularly attain higher academic achievements than children of Canadian-born parents. Parental education was also important in explaining the relatively low university completion rates among the second-generation Portuguese.

    Release date: 2008-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008067
    Description:

    This report provides trends on public school enrolments, educators and expenditures. It uses figures provided by provincial and territorial departments of education on public elementary and secondary schools.

    Release date: 2008-07-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-552-M
    Description:

    The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) was a seven-country initiative conducted in the fall of 1994. Its goal was to create comparable literacy profiles across national, linguistic and cultural boundaries. Successive waves of the survey now encompass close to 30 countries around the world. This monograph series features detailed studies from the IALS database by literacy scholars and experts in Canada and the United States. The research is primarily funded by Human Resources Development Canada. Monographs focus on current policy issues and cover topics such as adult training, literacy skill match and mismatch in the workplace, seniors' literacy skills and health, literacy and economic security, and many others.

    Release date: 2008-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2008020
    Description:

    Considerable research effort has been devoted to understanding earnings differences between immigrant and Canadian-born workers. Previous studies have established that immigrants typically earn less than Canadian-born workers with the same amount of education and work experience. The low earnings of immigrants are often attributed to the specificity of human capital to the country where it originates - in other words, education or work experience in the country of origin cannot be directly transferred to the host country, resulting in well qualified immigrants holding low paying jobs. Another possibility is that employers in the host country discriminate against immigrants. This paper uses data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS), which includes both standard demographic and labour market information for the Canadian born and immigrants and results from tests of literacy, numeracy and problem-solving skills, to investigate these issues. Interpreting the test scores as direct measurements of cognitive skills, the authors provide a closer examination of explanations for low immigrant earnings than has previously been possible. In addition, the data include more precise information on where education was obtained and age of migration than is available in most previous studies, further enabling scrutiny of immigrant-Canadian born earnings differentials.

    Release date: 2008-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413206
    Description:

    Lifelong learning has become a virtual career necessity. Not all pressures to train come from the employer employees have their reasons too. This article looks at how participation in job-related courses changed between 1993 and 2002 across a number of social and demographic characteristics. In particular, the factors affecting training, whether employer supported or self funded, are explored.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810513209
    Description:

    The general view is that teenage childbearing will have long-term negative effects on the well-being of the mother-- she may have more difficulty completing high school, which means she may be less likely to pursue postsecondary education and acquire skills for better jobs. Since low-skilled jobs tend to pay less, teenage mothers would have a higher likelihood of living in low income. This study looks at women aged 30 to 39 to determine whether teenage childbearing is related to lower long-term socioeconomic characteristics, with the focus on educational attainment, labour force participation, and living in low income.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210645
    Description:

    Highly-qualified personnel are an important component of Canada's labour market. Doctoral graduates form the new generation of professors that teach advanced courses at colleges and universities, playing a key role in the transmission of up-to-date knowledge to students. They contribute to research and development in the public and private sectors, generating new knowledge and innovations that contribute to international competitiveness and economic growth. Doctoral graduates also contribute to the social and political spheres of life by offering insights into the functioning of individuals and societies. Given the importance of this segment of postsecondary graduates, it is important to have information about their characteristics, fields of study and plans following graduation. Such information is collected by the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). This article summarizes the key findings of that report, including trends in the number of doctoral graduates and their fields of study, the number of foreign students who are doctoral graduates, the amount of time it takes to complete a PhD degree, and employment plans following graduation, including their plans to move abroad.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210644
    Description:

    This article provides information on employer-sponsored training in Canada. It examines the reasons for participating in adult education and training, the labour force status of participants, the impact of job and workplace characteristics on adult learning and the relationship between skills match-mismatch and participation in adult learning. The findings summarized here are based on analysis of data from the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), undertaken in 1994, and the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), undertaken in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)). The analysis is provided from an international perspective, with the situation in Canada being compared to that of three other countries - Norway, Switzerland and the United States.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008019
    Description:

    University degree holders in large cities are more prevalent and are growing at a more rapid pace than in smaller cities and rural areas. This relatively high rate of growth stems from net migratory flows and/or higher rates of degree attainment in cities. Using data from the 1996 and 2001 Censuses, this paper tests the relative importance of these two sources of human capital growth by decomposing degree-holder growth across cities into net migratory flows (domestic and foreign) and in situ growth: that is, growth resulting from higher rates of degree attainment among the resident populations of cities. We find that both sources are important, with in situ growth being the more dominant force. Hence, it is less the ability of cities to attract human capital than their ability to generate it that underlies the high rates of degree attainment we observe across city populations.

    Release date: 2008-06-02

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800110561
    Description:

    Over the last 30 years or so, a dramatic reversal has taken place on Canadian university campuses. According to the 1971 Census, 68% of 25 to 29 year-old university graduates were male. By 2006, women accounted for 60% of university graduates between the ages of 25 and 29.

    This article summarizes the results of recent research that set out to explain the large gender gap in university participation. The focus of the analysis is on the extent to which differences in the characteristics of boys and girls at age 15 account for the gender gap in university participation at age 19. Factors found to play a key role include differences in school marks at age 15; in standardized test scores in reading at age 15; in study habits; in parental expectations; and in the earnings advantage of university graduates over those with no more than a high school education. The analysis is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), Cycle 3 which collected information from YITS participants in 2003, when they were 19 years old.

    Release date: 2008-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008065
    Description:

    This report presents findings from the 2004/2005 Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The survey was administered to all students graduating from a doctoral program at a Canadian University. The 2004/2005 SED is the second edition of the annual survey.

    In the 2004/2005 academic year there were approximately 4,000 new doctoral graduates, adding to the stock of highly specialized human capital in Canada. Over three quarters of Canada's PhD graduates are completing their studies in a science or engineering field, with the most popular field of study being biological sciences. Although PhD graduates accounted for roughly 0.4% of the population, Canada lags behind many other OECD countries in this regard.

    Most graduates were finding success upon completion of their degrees as a large majority of graduates (73%) had firm plans to be working or continuing their studies by the time of graduation. The proportion of students who graduated without any graduate student debt decreased from the year before to reach 59%. Over three quarters of the graduates plan to stay in Canada to either work or continue their education.

    Release date: 2008-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008063
    Description:

    This study examines the completion and discontinuation trends in apprenticeship programs in Canada for the 1993 cohort of apprentices and compares the results with those for the 1992 cohort. The purpose is to provide indicators of success that will ensure that apprenticeship programs continue to meet the demand for skilled workers in Canada. The study is based on longitudinal data created from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS).

    Release date: 2008-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008055
    Description:

    Dropout rates, defined as the proportion of 20 to 24 year-olds without a high school diploma and not attending school, have been trending downward. Data from the Labour Force Survey shows that the rate for men fell from 21% in 1990/1991 to 14% in 2004/2005; for women, the rates were 16% in 1990/1991 and 9% in 2004/2005. Many dropouts later return to school, taking advantage of the 'second-chance' educational opportunities offered by provinces and institutions across Canada.

    This report uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey to analyze the determinants of the return-to-school. The analysis finds that dropout rates are lower among young women than among young men and that, if they do dropout before completing high school, young women are also more likely to return to school than young men.

    Young male and female dropouts are influenced by different factors in their decision to return to school. For young male dropouts, two of the strongest predictors of the decision to return to school are their parents' education and having taken, in high school, a mathematics course designed to prepare them for postsecondary studies. Young men who dropped out in their last year of high school were more likely to return to school than their counterparts who had dropped out earlier. For young women, time elapsed since leaving school is the most influential factor. However, young women who left school due to personal reasons (most often, pregnancy) are 30% more likely to return than other female dropouts.

    Release date: 2008-04-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008062
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information for the year 2007/2008. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by February 2008. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included in this bulletin but are available by special request.

    Release date: 2008-04-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-590-X2007001
    Description:

    The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a collaborative effort among member countries of the OECD, designed to assess, on a regular basis, the achievement of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy through a common international test. This report provides results from the PISA 2006 assessment of student performance in science, reading and mathematics at the provincial level, and compares the achievement of Canadian students to that of students internationally. PISA 2006 has a special focus on science. Over fifty countries participated in PISA 2006, including all 30 OECD countries. About 22,000 15-year-olds from more than 1,000 schools took part in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700610528
    Description:

    In a recent study, David Green and Craig Riddell investigate the distribution of literacy skills in the Canadian-born population and how those skills are generated. They also investigate the nature of literacy generation in the years after individuals have left formal schooling and are in the labour market, and the relationship between literacy and income. This article summarizes the results of their research. The data sources for the analysis are the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS 1994) and the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS 2003). The focus of the research is on literacy generation in the Canadian economy. As a result, anyone born outside of Canada is excluded from the analysis in order to focus attention on the Canadian educational system. Information on Aboriginal peoples was also excluded from this analysis, being reserved for a separate report.

    Release date: 2008-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008061
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the final set of tables which contain salary information for the year 2005/2006. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2008-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2008019
    Description:

    Using data from the International Survey of Reading Skills, this report identifies the reading profiles of different groups of adult Canadians with low literacy skills, examines in depth their reading abilities, and describes their varied literacy learning needs. The new insights offered will inform the development of more targeted literacy policies and will be useful to both researchers and practitioners in designing and delivering appropriate and effective reading instruction programs for Canadian adults.

    Release date: 2008-01-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700510500
    Description:

    Until very recently, reliable data on the literacy of Aboriginal people in Canada have been scarce. The 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) collected data from large enough samples of Aboriginal people living in urban areas in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, as well as Aboriginal people living in selected communities in the territories, to answer key questions about the literacy proficiency of these populations. The off-reserve Aboriginal population in Manitoba and Saskatchewan is comprised of significant proportions of individuals who self-identify as First Nations and Métis. The IALSS background questionnaire allows researchers to make distinctions on the basis of self-reported Aboriginal identity group.

    This report uses data from the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey to provide a profile of the level and distribution of adult literacy among the off-reserve First Nations and Métis populations residing in urban areas in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Literacy profiles are provided for males and females, for different age groups and by educational attainment. Finally, the article examines the literacy profiles of the employed and unemployed sub-groups within these populations.

    Release date: 2008-01-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700510501
    Description:

    This article uses the first three cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to ask the question: are there any differences in early labour market outcomes following postsecondary graduation for young adults who took a break of more than four months between finishing high school and starting postsecondary studies compared to those who went straight on to postsecondary education? Results suggest that taking time off between high school graduation and postsecondary studies affects university and college educated young adults differently. Moreover, what matters most is not whether youth had delayed starting a postsecondary program following high school graduation, but rather whether they went to a postsecondary program and saw it through to completion. Meanwhile, pertinent background factors include grade-point average, parental education and sex.

    Release date: 2008-01-07

Reference (15)

Reference (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Index and guides: 92-445-X
    Description:

    This kit provides teachers with innovative classroom materials that make use of the results of the 2006 Census. Activities are available for intermediate and secondary schools, are classroom-ready, and have been classroom-tested by professional educators. Minimal preparation time is required.

    Activities are grouped according to subject, using census terminology.

    The 2006 Census Teacher's Kit activities are appropriate for the following subjects: English, Mathematics, Social Sciences, Geography, History, Family Studies and Informatics. Suggested grade levels are indicated on each activity and all necessary tables, charts, graphs and data are included.

    Release date: 2008-11-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008001
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008002
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008003
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008004
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008009
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008005
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008006
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008007
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008008
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Index and guides: 97-560-G2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following demographic variable: Education.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts and data quality. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-08-05

  • Index and guides: 97-560-G
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following demographic variable: Education.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts and data quality. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-08-05

  • Index and guides: 97-563-P2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following variables: After-tax income, Total income and its components, Income status as well as other related variables from the Income and earnings release.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-05-01

  • Index and guides: 97-560-P2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following demographic variable: Education.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-04-08

  • Index and guides: 97-560-P
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following demographic variable: Education.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-04-08

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