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All (42) (25 of 42 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-604-X
    Description:

    Literacy for Life, is the second report from the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey. It presents additional results on the nature and magnitude of the literacy gaps faced by OECD countries and how these gaps have evolved over the medium term.

    It offers new insights into the factors that influence the formation of adult skills in various settings - at home and at work - for the eleven countries participating in the first and last round of data collection between 2003 and 2008. The study offers comparative evidence on the impact of various factors on the supply of skill. The study offers a special focus on numeracy skills and problem solving skills. It explores the relationships between numeracy and key socio-demographic factors as well as labour market outcomes and earnings.

    It highlights the importance of problem solving skills by defining this foundational skill and by exploring its determinants as well as its relative role in influencing important labour market outcomes.

    The report offers also an analysis of performance across multiple skill domains. It investigates the skill profiles of various population groups defined in terms of the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of those who score at levels deemed to be low in one or more skill domains and explores the resulting consequences.

    The report concludes by investigating the issue of skill mismatch in the labour market and its relationship to adult learning. The extent and distribution of mismatch between the day to day literacy related requirements of workers and the literacy skills they have obtained is an important issue that is being explored in this study.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Index and guides: 81-582-G2011002
    Description:

    This handbook, based on the first edition, entitled Education Indicators in Canada: Handbook for the Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program 2007, was developed to update the general descriptions for the indicators of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) as new sets of tables are released. It complements the tables and both share a common objective: to provide consistent and high-quality information on education in Canada. The up-to-date array of indicators helps support informed decision-making, policy formulation and program development throughout the country.

    This companion Handbook is a reference document that gives readers a broad understanding of each indicator, rather than the very specific methodological descriptions that would be necessary to reproduce the indicator using the raw data.

    PCEIP is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Canadian Council of Ministers of Education.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Table: 81-582-X2011002
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) provides a statistical portrait of the elementary, secondary and postsecondary education systems through the following products:

    Tables - These tables update or add to those published in previous issues of Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program.

    Fact sheets - The Education Indicators in Canada: Fact Sheets series provides an "at-a-glance" overview of particular aspects of education in Canada and summarizes key data trends in selected tables.

    Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective - This annual report combines international statistics from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) with comparable provincial and territorial figures. The first report was published in September 2009.

    Handbook - Education Indicators in Canada: Handbook for the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program provides brief, general descriptions of the data sources and methodology behind the indicators.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada. PCEIP products are prepared by the two organizations in collaboration with the provincial and territorial departments and ministries responsible for education and training. They are aimed at policy makers, practitioners and the general public.

    The previous PCEIP publications evolved into this new line of products, beginning in 2009.

    Tables for the following education indicators have been updated:

    A portrait of the school-age population: Indicator A3, Low income

    Financing education systems: Indicator B2, Public and private expenditure on education

    Elementary-secondary education: Indicator C2, Elementary-secondary school: enrolments and educators.

    Postsecondary education: Indicator D1, Enrolment in postsecondary education; Indicator D2, Postsecondary completions and graduation rates; and Indicator D3, University educators.

    Transitions and outcomes: Indicator E1, Transitions to postsecondary education; Indicator E2, Transitions to the labour market.

    Reference statistics: F1, Reference statistics for use in the calculation of indicators

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411594
    Description:

    A typical and direct path to postsecondary education involves high school graduates completing high school in May or June of any given year and then entering postsecondary education in September, resulting in a typical gap of about three months or less. However, not all young people follow this direct path, choosing instead to delay the start of postsecondary studies. This article summarizes the main findings of a recent research report that measured median delay times between high school graduation and starting a first postsecondary program and identified the factors associated with either speeding up or slowing down this transition.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411595
    Description:

    This article summarizes the key findings of a recent research report that examined the characteristics of young people who are most likely to go on to college or university following high school graduation and the factors that play a role in that decision. The focus of that research is on: youth from lower-income families; those from families with no parental history of attending postsecondary education; those living in rural areas; first- and second-generation children of immigrants; those from single parent (or other non-traditional) families; and Aboriginal youth.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111542
    Description:

    This chapter examines different education-related indicators. We begin with a general profile of women's educational attainment, followed by the evolution of their situation in time compared to that of men. We then present more detailed data on the different stages of education, from elementary and high school through to university.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011096
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the final set of tables which contain salary information for the year 2009/2010. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2011-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011095
    Description:

    The report provides elementary and secondary school public data at the provincial, territorial and Canada-wide levels for key education statistics, such as enrolment, graduates, finance, and educator. Data is collected for a five-year period which allows for extensive review of the data going back to 1997, the first school year that elementary-secondary education statistics are on file. Private school data for years 2007/2008 to 2009/2010 covers enrolment, graduates and educators.

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011336
    Description:

    This paper examines the education outcomes (including the chances of being a high school drop-out) of a cohort of immigrants who arrived in Canada as children using the 2006 Census. The research documents the degree to which high school graduation for immigrant children may change discretely after a particular age at arrival in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011094
    Description:

    Unlike the waves of immigrants who arrived in the 1950s and 1960s, those arriving in Canada since the 1970s have possessed relatively high educational levels, making an enormous contribution to the pool of individuals in Canada with postsecondary qualifications. Upon their arrival however, many immigrants initially face difficulties finding employment related to their field of study as well as finding jobs that pay relatively high wages.

    Using data from the 2006 Census of Population, the report presents a profile of internationally-educated paid workers and focus on the different characteristics and determinants more closely associated with an easier integration in the Canadian labour market: How likely are they to be working in their field of study or in an equivalent occupation? What is their likelihood of having employment earnings at or above the median level of earnings associated with the occupation corresponding best to their field of study?

    Different aspects are taken into account when examining these labour market outcomes. These include the time elapsed since landing, region of education, type of credential, as well as diverse socio-demographic characteristics such as sex, age group, marital status, presence of children, province, territory and area of residence, language ability, and visible minority status. Results for internationally-educated immigrant paid workers are compared to their counterparts with a postsecondary credential earned in Canada and to the Canadian-born paid workers with a postsecondary education.

    Release date: 2011-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011092
    Description:

    PISA is a collaborative effort among member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and is designed to provide policy-oriented indicators of the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students. PISA data shed light on a range of factors that contribute to successful students, schools and education systems. This report summarises the results from PISA 2009 for students in the minority-language school systems in Canada within the 7 provinces that reported data for both their English and French language school systems (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia). The purpose of the following analyses was to develop a profile of minority-language students in Canada (French outside of Quebec, English in Quebec) and the schools they attend.

    Release date: 2011-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100311532
    Description:

    This article summarizes the results of the Programme for International Student Assessment 2009 for students in minority-language school systems in the seven provinces that reported data for both their English- and French-language school systems (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia). The minority-language student population consists of Anglophone students in Quebec and Francophone students outside of Quebec.

    Release date: 2011-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100311538
    Description:

    This article examines trends in registered apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2009 period, using information from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). Though data are available for all 22 major trade groups, this article focuses on the top four in terms of total number of apprentices in 2009: electricians, carpenters, automotive service technicians, and plumbers, pipefitters and steamfitters. The analysis first looks at trends in the total number of apprenticeship registrations for each of these four major trade groups and then discusses trends in new registrations, completions and discontinuations.

    Release date: 2011-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011093
    Description:

    This report uses data from the 2006 Census of Population to examine the extent to which the location completion of highest postsecondary diploma/degree completion affects the relative labour market success of immigrants to in Canada. Using descriptive and multivariate techniques, different immigrant cohorts are compared to the Canadian-born with respect to labour force status, earnings and the match between occupation and required schooling. In line with prior Canadian research, we find that in comparison with the Canadian-born, immigrants, especially very-recent immigrants, are more likely to be out of the labour force and less likely to be paid employees, even after accounting for a set of pertinent variables drawn from prior research. When employed, they are much more likely to be overeducated and less likely to be correctly matched or self-employed. They are also more likely to face an earnings disadvantage in Canada's labour markets. Location of study plays a role. Those who completed their postsecondary education in the United Kingdom, France, the United States or, to some extent in Germany, were much more likely to do well on Canada's labour markets in terms of employment ratios and earnings, regardless of immigration cohort, compared to those who completed their postsecondary studies in any other foreign country, especially China, the Russian Federation, Pakistan or South Korea. This finding leads us to conclude that many prospective employers who use education to assess the potential productivity of prospective labour market participants may perceive the 'outcomes' of the British, American, French and German postsecondary education systems as having components that are more easily transferable to Canada than the 'outcomes' of the Chinese, Russian Federation, Pakistani and South Korean postsecondary education systems. Our results lend support to the idea that many Canadian employers and several other stakeholders (such as regulatory bodies, assessment agencies, etc.) may not value postsecondary educational qualifications from all source regions equally.

    Release date: 2011-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011091
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information for the year 2010/2011. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by June 2011. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included in this bulletin but are available by special request.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311539
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training taken by immigrant employees in Canada. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), it examines the incidence, subject and objectives of, and satisfaction with, job-related training of immigrant and Canadian-born employees. Differences among sub-groups of immigrants are compared, as well as other characteristics related to the incidence of training. Perceptions of barriers to training among immigrants and the Canadian-born are also explored.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211536
    Description:

    Young adults with one or two parents who are university-educated are much more likely to have a degree themselves than those whose parents are less well-educated. This article determines whether intergenerational mobility in university education is increasing. Specifically, whether people whose parents did not complete university are themselves more likely to have finished university than nearly 25 years ago is examined, as is whether the gap between them and people whose parents completed university has narrowed over time.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211493
    Description:

    According to the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), nearly 8 million adults between the ages of 25 and 64 took part in formal training activities or education between July 2007 and June 2008, and most of them did so for career- or job-related reasons. This article examines the participation of adult workers in formal, job-related training activities or education. The participation rates of adult workers are analyzed in relation to their demographic characteristics, occupation, employer characteristics, training objectives and learning obstacles.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211490
    Description:

    Previous analysis based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) has shown that reading proficiency, as measured in the Programme for the International Student Assessment (PISA) at age 15, is strongly associated with both high school graduation and postsecondary participation. This article uses the most recent data from YITS, collected when youth were age 25, to examine educational, labour market, income and family formation outcomes associated with reading proficiency levels on PISA at age 15. The intent of the analysis is to identify any life-path differences that were associated with reading proficiency levels at age 15. The analysis is descriptive and exploratory in nature. Further analysis is needed to identify causal relationships in the data.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311505
    Description:

    Even though immigrants who arrived in Canada in recent decades are more educated than other Canadians, they enrol in postsecondary educational institutions in proportionally greater numbers after their arrival. This article examines a cohort of immigrants who were between 25 and 44 years of age when they arrived in Canada in 1998 and 1999. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), changes in immigrants' employment income over an eight-year period are studied based on whether these individuals pursued postsecondary education in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2011007
    Description:

    This fact sheet offers brief outlines of spending on postsecondary education, based on data from three Statistics Canada data sources: the Survey of Household Spending (SHS); the Tuition and Living Accommodation Costs for Full-time Students at Canadian Degree-granting Institutions (TLAC) survey; and the Financial Information of Universities and Colleges (FIUC) survey. Information on household spending on postsecondary tuition, on university tuition fees paid by students, and on student fees as a proportion of university revenues is presented for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2011-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011090
    Description:

    Not all high school graduates who attend a post-secondary institution go immediately after completing their diploma. An ever-increasing number of Canadian youth choose to remain out of the education system for a period of time prior to re-entering. A great deal of what we know about a gap year comes from other countries, particularly the United Kingdom. Who delays and for how long are, however, two questions that remain to be answered in the Canadian context. The current paper uses all five cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to address the scant attention paid in the Canadian literature to the delay of the start of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Kaplan Meier results show that the median length of time between high school graduation and start of the first post-secondary (PSE) program is 4 months; however, this appears to be substantially longer for males, First Nations youth, Anglophones, youth from Ontario and youth whose parents have low levels of educational attainment. Equally influential were characteristics during the high school years. For example, youth with low marks, who worked many hours in paid employment while in high school, who skipped classes regularly, who took part in a lot of extracurricular activities not organized by the school, and whose close friends said they were not planning on going to PSE had median gap times between high school graduation and the start of postsecondary studies that were much longer than the average. Cox Proportional Hazard models confirm the robustness of several of the descriptive findings, including the effects of gender, province of high school, parental education, working during high school, marks, extracurricular activities, and the education plans of close friends.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100111433
    Description:

    This article uses data from the most recent Elementary Secondary Education Survey to examine broad trends in enrolment and educators in publicly-funded elementary and secondary schools over the 2000/2001 to 2008/2009 period, by province and territory Specifically, it examines trends in enrolments and the number of graduates; enrolment in second-language immersion and minority-language education; enrolment in courses where an Aboriginal language is the subject of instruction; and trends in the number of educators and in the student-educator ratio.

    Release date: 2011-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100111432
    Description:

    The value of education and the benefits that flow from it are substantial for many Canadian families. Previous research has found that Canadian parents are strongly committed to their children's postsecondary education. However, many parents of children under the age of 18 are confronted with a number of competing savings priorities. Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this article examines who saves for postsecondary education and how they do so.

    Release date: 2011-05-19

Data (8)

Data (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Table: 81-582-X2011002
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) provides a statistical portrait of the elementary, secondary and postsecondary education systems through the following products:

    Tables - These tables update or add to those published in previous issues of Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program.

    Fact sheets - The Education Indicators in Canada: Fact Sheets series provides an "at-a-glance" overview of particular aspects of education in Canada and summarizes key data trends in selected tables.

    Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective - This annual report combines international statistics from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) with comparable provincial and territorial figures. The first report was published in September 2009.

    Handbook - Education Indicators in Canada: Handbook for the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program provides brief, general descriptions of the data sources and methodology behind the indicators.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada. PCEIP products are prepared by the two organizations in collaboration with the provincial and territorial departments and ministries responsible for education and training. They are aimed at policy makers, practitioners and the general public.

    The previous PCEIP publications evolved into this new line of products, beginning in 2009.

    Tables for the following education indicators have been updated:

    A portrait of the school-age population: Indicator A3, Low income

    Financing education systems: Indicator B2, Public and private expenditure on education

    Elementary-secondary education: Indicator C2, Elementary-secondary school: enrolments and educators.

    Postsecondary education: Indicator D1, Enrolment in postsecondary education; Indicator D2, Postsecondary completions and graduation rates; and Indicator D3, University educators.

    Transitions and outcomes: Indicator E1, Transitions to postsecondary education; Indicator E2, Transitions to the labour market.

    Reference statistics: F1, Reference statistics for use in the calculation of indicators

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Public use microdata: 95M0029X
    Description:

    This hierarchical file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2006 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2006 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. The individual file was released on March 4, 2010 and the hierarchical file is available as of today, May 2, 2011.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    This product, offered on CD-ROM, contains the data file (in ASCII format), user documentation and SAS and SPSS program source codes to enable you to read the set of records. Note: users will require knowledge of data manipulation and retrieval software such as SAS or SPSS to be able to use this product.

    Release date: 2011-05-02

  • Table: 81-582-X2011001
    Description:

    Tables for the following education indicators have been updated: Financing education systems: Indicator B2, Public and private expenditure on education Elementary-secondary education: Indicator C1, Early years and school readiness; Indicator C2, Elementary-secondary school: enrolments and educators; Indicator C4, Student achievement. Postsecondary education: Indicator D1, Enrolment in postsecondary education; Indicator D2, Postsecondary completions and graduation rates; Indicator D4, Research and development; and Indicator D6, Educational attainment of the population aged 25 to 64. Transitions and outcomes: Indicator E3, Labour market outcomes. Reference statistics: F1, Reference statistics for use in the calculation of indicators

    Release date: 2011-04-29

  • Thematic map: 82-583-X201000111210
    Description:

    This map shows the distribution, by health region, of the proportion of high school graduates between the ages of 25 to 29.

    Release date: 2011-02-28

  • Thematic map: 82-583-X201000111215
    Description:

    This map shows the distribution, by health region, of the proportion of post-secondary graduates between the ages of 25 to 54.

    Release date: 2011-02-28

  • Public use microdata: 11-625-X
    Description:

    This subscription-based service offers institutional access to the collection of available Statistics Canada public use microdata files (PUMF). For a yearly fee, designated contacts at subscribing institutions can have unlimited access to all microdata and documentation available in the PUMF collection. Public use microdata files contain anonymized, non-aggregated data. Using statistical software, the end user can group and manipulate data variables in these files to suit data and research requirements.

    Release date: 2011-01-17

Analysis (32)

Analysis (32) (25 of 32 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-604-X
    Description:

    Literacy for Life, is the second report from the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey. It presents additional results on the nature and magnitude of the literacy gaps faced by OECD countries and how these gaps have evolved over the medium term.

    It offers new insights into the factors that influence the formation of adult skills in various settings - at home and at work - for the eleven countries participating in the first and last round of data collection between 2003 and 2008. The study offers comparative evidence on the impact of various factors on the supply of skill. The study offers a special focus on numeracy skills and problem solving skills. It explores the relationships between numeracy and key socio-demographic factors as well as labour market outcomes and earnings.

    It highlights the importance of problem solving skills by defining this foundational skill and by exploring its determinants as well as its relative role in influencing important labour market outcomes.

    The report offers also an analysis of performance across multiple skill domains. It investigates the skill profiles of various population groups defined in terms of the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of those who score at levels deemed to be low in one or more skill domains and explores the resulting consequences.

    The report concludes by investigating the issue of skill mismatch in the labour market and its relationship to adult learning. The extent and distribution of mismatch between the day to day literacy related requirements of workers and the literacy skills they have obtained is an important issue that is being explored in this study.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411594
    Description:

    A typical and direct path to postsecondary education involves high school graduates completing high school in May or June of any given year and then entering postsecondary education in September, resulting in a typical gap of about three months or less. However, not all young people follow this direct path, choosing instead to delay the start of postsecondary studies. This article summarizes the main findings of a recent research report that measured median delay times between high school graduation and starting a first postsecondary program and identified the factors associated with either speeding up or slowing down this transition.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411595
    Description:

    This article summarizes the key findings of a recent research report that examined the characteristics of young people who are most likely to go on to college or university following high school graduation and the factors that play a role in that decision. The focus of that research is on: youth from lower-income families; those from families with no parental history of attending postsecondary education; those living in rural areas; first- and second-generation children of immigrants; those from single parent (or other non-traditional) families; and Aboriginal youth.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111542
    Description:

    This chapter examines different education-related indicators. We begin with a general profile of women's educational attainment, followed by the evolution of their situation in time compared to that of men. We then present more detailed data on the different stages of education, from elementary and high school through to university.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011096
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the final set of tables which contain salary information for the year 2009/2010. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2011-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011095
    Description:

    The report provides elementary and secondary school public data at the provincial, territorial and Canada-wide levels for key education statistics, such as enrolment, graduates, finance, and educator. Data is collected for a five-year period which allows for extensive review of the data going back to 1997, the first school year that elementary-secondary education statistics are on file. Private school data for years 2007/2008 to 2009/2010 covers enrolment, graduates and educators.

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011336
    Description:

    This paper examines the education outcomes (including the chances of being a high school drop-out) of a cohort of immigrants who arrived in Canada as children using the 2006 Census. The research documents the degree to which high school graduation for immigrant children may change discretely after a particular age at arrival in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011094
    Description:

    Unlike the waves of immigrants who arrived in the 1950s and 1960s, those arriving in Canada since the 1970s have possessed relatively high educational levels, making an enormous contribution to the pool of individuals in Canada with postsecondary qualifications. Upon their arrival however, many immigrants initially face difficulties finding employment related to their field of study as well as finding jobs that pay relatively high wages.

    Using data from the 2006 Census of Population, the report presents a profile of internationally-educated paid workers and focus on the different characteristics and determinants more closely associated with an easier integration in the Canadian labour market: How likely are they to be working in their field of study or in an equivalent occupation? What is their likelihood of having employment earnings at or above the median level of earnings associated with the occupation corresponding best to their field of study?

    Different aspects are taken into account when examining these labour market outcomes. These include the time elapsed since landing, region of education, type of credential, as well as diverse socio-demographic characteristics such as sex, age group, marital status, presence of children, province, territory and area of residence, language ability, and visible minority status. Results for internationally-educated immigrant paid workers are compared to their counterparts with a postsecondary credential earned in Canada and to the Canadian-born paid workers with a postsecondary education.

    Release date: 2011-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011092
    Description:

    PISA is a collaborative effort among member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and is designed to provide policy-oriented indicators of the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students. PISA data shed light on a range of factors that contribute to successful students, schools and education systems. This report summarises the results from PISA 2009 for students in the minority-language school systems in Canada within the 7 provinces that reported data for both their English and French language school systems (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia). The purpose of the following analyses was to develop a profile of minority-language students in Canada (French outside of Quebec, English in Quebec) and the schools they attend.

    Release date: 2011-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100311532
    Description:

    This article summarizes the results of the Programme for International Student Assessment 2009 for students in minority-language school systems in the seven provinces that reported data for both their English- and French-language school systems (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia). The minority-language student population consists of Anglophone students in Quebec and Francophone students outside of Quebec.

    Release date: 2011-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100311538
    Description:

    This article examines trends in registered apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2009 period, using information from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). Though data are available for all 22 major trade groups, this article focuses on the top four in terms of total number of apprentices in 2009: electricians, carpenters, automotive service technicians, and plumbers, pipefitters and steamfitters. The analysis first looks at trends in the total number of apprenticeship registrations for each of these four major trade groups and then discusses trends in new registrations, completions and discontinuations.

    Release date: 2011-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011093
    Description:

    This report uses data from the 2006 Census of Population to examine the extent to which the location completion of highest postsecondary diploma/degree completion affects the relative labour market success of immigrants to in Canada. Using descriptive and multivariate techniques, different immigrant cohorts are compared to the Canadian-born with respect to labour force status, earnings and the match between occupation and required schooling. In line with prior Canadian research, we find that in comparison with the Canadian-born, immigrants, especially very-recent immigrants, are more likely to be out of the labour force and less likely to be paid employees, even after accounting for a set of pertinent variables drawn from prior research. When employed, they are much more likely to be overeducated and less likely to be correctly matched or self-employed. They are also more likely to face an earnings disadvantage in Canada's labour markets. Location of study plays a role. Those who completed their postsecondary education in the United Kingdom, France, the United States or, to some extent in Germany, were much more likely to do well on Canada's labour markets in terms of employment ratios and earnings, regardless of immigration cohort, compared to those who completed their postsecondary studies in any other foreign country, especially China, the Russian Federation, Pakistan or South Korea. This finding leads us to conclude that many prospective employers who use education to assess the potential productivity of prospective labour market participants may perceive the 'outcomes' of the British, American, French and German postsecondary education systems as having components that are more easily transferable to Canada than the 'outcomes' of the Chinese, Russian Federation, Pakistani and South Korean postsecondary education systems. Our results lend support to the idea that many Canadian employers and several other stakeholders (such as regulatory bodies, assessment agencies, etc.) may not value postsecondary educational qualifications from all source regions equally.

    Release date: 2011-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011091
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information for the year 2010/2011. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by June 2011. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included in this bulletin but are available by special request.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311539
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training taken by immigrant employees in Canada. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), it examines the incidence, subject and objectives of, and satisfaction with, job-related training of immigrant and Canadian-born employees. Differences among sub-groups of immigrants are compared, as well as other characteristics related to the incidence of training. Perceptions of barriers to training among immigrants and the Canadian-born are also explored.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211536
    Description:

    Young adults with one or two parents who are university-educated are much more likely to have a degree themselves than those whose parents are less well-educated. This article determines whether intergenerational mobility in university education is increasing. Specifically, whether people whose parents did not complete university are themselves more likely to have finished university than nearly 25 years ago is examined, as is whether the gap between them and people whose parents completed university has narrowed over time.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211493
    Description:

    According to the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), nearly 8 million adults between the ages of 25 and 64 took part in formal training activities or education between July 2007 and June 2008, and most of them did so for career- or job-related reasons. This article examines the participation of adult workers in formal, job-related training activities or education. The participation rates of adult workers are analyzed in relation to their demographic characteristics, occupation, employer characteristics, training objectives and learning obstacles.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211490
    Description:

    Previous analysis based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) has shown that reading proficiency, as measured in the Programme for the International Student Assessment (PISA) at age 15, is strongly associated with both high school graduation and postsecondary participation. This article uses the most recent data from YITS, collected when youth were age 25, to examine educational, labour market, income and family formation outcomes associated with reading proficiency levels on PISA at age 15. The intent of the analysis is to identify any life-path differences that were associated with reading proficiency levels at age 15. The analysis is descriptive and exploratory in nature. Further analysis is needed to identify causal relationships in the data.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311505
    Description:

    Even though immigrants who arrived in Canada in recent decades are more educated than other Canadians, they enrol in postsecondary educational institutions in proportionally greater numbers after their arrival. This article examines a cohort of immigrants who were between 25 and 44 years of age when they arrived in Canada in 1998 and 1999. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), changes in immigrants' employment income over an eight-year period are studied based on whether these individuals pursued postsecondary education in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2011007
    Description:

    This fact sheet offers brief outlines of spending on postsecondary education, based on data from three Statistics Canada data sources: the Survey of Household Spending (SHS); the Tuition and Living Accommodation Costs for Full-time Students at Canadian Degree-granting Institutions (TLAC) survey; and the Financial Information of Universities and Colleges (FIUC) survey. Information on household spending on postsecondary tuition, on university tuition fees paid by students, and on student fees as a proportion of university revenues is presented for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2011-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011090
    Description:

    Not all high school graduates who attend a post-secondary institution go immediately after completing their diploma. An ever-increasing number of Canadian youth choose to remain out of the education system for a period of time prior to re-entering. A great deal of what we know about a gap year comes from other countries, particularly the United Kingdom. Who delays and for how long are, however, two questions that remain to be answered in the Canadian context. The current paper uses all five cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to address the scant attention paid in the Canadian literature to the delay of the start of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Kaplan Meier results show that the median length of time between high school graduation and start of the first post-secondary (PSE) program is 4 months; however, this appears to be substantially longer for males, First Nations youth, Anglophones, youth from Ontario and youth whose parents have low levels of educational attainment. Equally influential were characteristics during the high school years. For example, youth with low marks, who worked many hours in paid employment while in high school, who skipped classes regularly, who took part in a lot of extracurricular activities not organized by the school, and whose close friends said they were not planning on going to PSE had median gap times between high school graduation and the start of postsecondary studies that were much longer than the average. Cox Proportional Hazard models confirm the robustness of several of the descriptive findings, including the effects of gender, province of high school, parental education, working during high school, marks, extracurricular activities, and the education plans of close friends.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100111433
    Description:

    This article uses data from the most recent Elementary Secondary Education Survey to examine broad trends in enrolment and educators in publicly-funded elementary and secondary schools over the 2000/2001 to 2008/2009 period, by province and territory Specifically, it examines trends in enrolments and the number of graduates; enrolment in second-language immersion and minority-language education; enrolment in courses where an Aboriginal language is the subject of instruction; and trends in the number of educators and in the student-educator ratio.

    Release date: 2011-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100111432
    Description:

    The value of education and the benefits that flow from it are substantial for many Canadian families. Previous research has found that Canadian parents are strongly committed to their children's postsecondary education. However, many parents of children under the age of 18 are confronted with a number of competing savings priorities. Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this article examines who saves for postsecondary education and how they do so.

    Release date: 2011-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011334
    Description:

    In this study, the long-term impact on earnings of attending post-secondary education institutions following job loss is estimated using a large longitudinal administrative database of Canadian workers. A difference-in-difference model is used for this purpose. The results suggest that, over the period spanning five years preceding and nine years following job loss, workers who attended post-secondary education shortly after displacement saw their earnings increase by almost $7,000 more than displaced workers who did not. Significant benefits are found by sex, age, marital status, and union coverage, with the exception of men aged 35 to 44 years. Despite the benefits of education, job displacement is found to be associated with only a modest increase in post-secondary education attendance for all groups examined.

    Release date: 2011-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011333
    Description:

    The number of registered apprentices in Canada more than doubled between 1995 and 2007, yet successful completion of apprenticeship programs increased by only about one-third as much. Uncovering the factors related to low completion rates is a necessary first step to ensuring that today's skilled labour is replaced in the future. This study utilizes the 2007 National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) to investigate the completion behaviour of individuals enrolled in apprenticeship programs. These behaviours include continuing, discontinuing (or quitting), and completing programs. The NAS contains detailed demographic information regarding respondents' backgrounds and the characteristics of apprenticeship programs. The results show that program completion is positively related to a variety of demographic characteristics, including being married and having completed at least a high school education prior to beginning an apprenticeship. Males and females have similar completion probabilities. Completion is negatively related to time in the apprenticeship program (beyond the normal program length) and the number of employers during training. Type of technical training and having a journeyperson always present enhance the probability of completion. The regional unemployment rate has little effect on whether an individual completes an apprenticeship program or not. There are also large provincial and trade group differences.

    This is a revised version of an earlier paper circulated under the same title (Laporte and Mueller 2010). We thank the Canadian Labour Market and Skills Researcher Network (CLSRN) and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) for supporting this research. We would also like to thank an anonymous reviewer, Grant Schellenberg, and Pamela White for useful comments as well as participants at the January 2010 HRSDC-CLSRN Apprenticeship Workshop in Vancouver and many colleagues at Statistics Canada and HRSDC.

    Release date: 2011-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011331
    Description:

    This paper reviews recent research on the determinants of the labour market outcomes of the children of immigrants in Canada and in the U.S. New research on outcomes in Canada is also presented. In the aggregate, and with no controls, the labour market outcomes of the second generation-the children of immigrants-are equal to, or better than, those of the third-and-higher generations-the children of domestic-born parents. However, the story is somewhat different after one has accounted for the superior educational levels and the residential locations of the second generation. In the U.S, the second generation's advantage in labour market outcomes disappears; in Canada, among second-generation members of a visible-minority group, the advantage turns marginally negative. Ethnic group/source region differences in outcomes loom large in both countries. The important determinants of the earnings gap between the second generation and the third-and-higher generations include educational attainment, which accounts for about half of the wage gap, residential location, ethnic background, the degree of "ethnic capital," and the educational and earnings mobility between immigrants and their children.

    Release date: 2011-03-03

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Index and guides: 81-582-G2011002
    Description:

    This handbook, based on the first edition, entitled Education Indicators in Canada: Handbook for the Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program 2007, was developed to update the general descriptions for the indicators of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) as new sets of tables are released. It complements the tables and both share a common objective: to provide consistent and high-quality information on education in Canada. The up-to-date array of indicators helps support informed decision-making, policy formulation and program development throughout the country.

    This companion Handbook is a reference document that gives readers a broad understanding of each indicator, rather than the very specific methodological descriptions that would be necessary to reproduce the indicator using the raw data.

    PCEIP is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Canadian Council of Ministers of Education.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Index and guides: 81-582-G2011001
    Description:

    This handbook, based on the first edition, entitled Education Indicators in Canada: Handbook for the Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program 2007, was developed to update the general descriptions for the indicators of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) as new sets of tables are released. It complements the tables and both share a common objective: to provide consistent and high-quality information on education in Canada. The up-to-date array of indicators helps support informed decision-making, policy formulation and program development throughout the country.

    This new companion Handbook is a reference document that gives readers a broad understanding of each indicator, rather than the very specific methodological descriptions that would be necessary to reproduce the indicator using the raw data. PCEIP is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Canadian Council of Ministers of Education.

    Release date: 2011-04-29

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