Statistics by subject – Health status and access to health care

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All (31) (25 of 31 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401014099
    Description:

    This study uses the linked 2006 Census-Hospital Discharge Abstract Database to examine hospitalization during the 2004-to-2006 period, by immigrant status of Ontario seniors.

    Release date: 2014-10-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311693
    Description:

    This study describes an area-based method of calculating standardized, comparable hospitalization rates for areas with varying concentrations of foreign-born, at national and subnational levels.

    Release date: 2012-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100411559
    Description:

    With data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, this analysis examines the relationship between self-reported official language proficiency and transitions to poor self-reported health during the first four years in the country.

    Release date: 2011-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-622-X2011008
    Description:

    The 1991 to 2001 census mortality follow-up study permits analysis of the healthy immigrant effect-the dominant hypothesis in immigrant health research-by world region of birth and for different areas of Canada. This hypothesis suggests that immigrants arrive with better health than the Canadian-born population, but that this health advantage tends to disappear over time. The results of this study provide overall support for this trend. However, similar to earlier research, the analysis of age-standardized mortality rates by world region of origin, period of immigration and residence reveals underlying differences that may not be evident when only the overall results are examined.

    Release date: 2011-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201000111102
    Description:

    For many Canadians, the first point of contact for medical care is their doctor. Not having a regular medical doctor is associated with fewer visits with general practitioners or specialists, who can play a role in screening and treating medical conditions early. Over the past decade, the percentage of Canadians who report having a regular medical doctor has declined.

    Release date: 2010-04-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-229-X
    Description:

    This report examines the health of Canadians by focusing on demography, health status, health behaviours, and the environment. The aging of the population provides a context for the report. Measures that reflect physical, mental and social well-being are presented, followed by indicators of positive and negative behaviours that are known to influence health status. Finally, indicators of the social and physical environments in which we live and work are examined. Together, these Health Indicators highlight the health of Canadians at a national and provincial/territorial level. They provide benchmarks for comparisons over time and place, from regional to international levels.

    This report celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Health Indicators project. Since 1999, Statistics Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information have collaborated on developing and providing a broad range of indicators for health regions across Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-11

  • Table: 89-628-X2009012
    Description:

    The following fact sheet is a profile of Canadians 15 years of age and older, who reported having a hearing limitation. It is important to note that this includes people who are completely deaf, deafened , hard of hearing or have some hearing loss. This fact sheet examines the areas of education, employment, computer usage, and aids and assistive devices.

    Release date: 2009-02-26

  • Table: 89-628-X2009014
    Description:

    The following fact sheet is a profile of Canadians 15 years of age and older, who reported having a learning limitation. The respondents' answers to the limitation questions represent their perception of the situation and are therefore subjective. This fact sheet examines education, employment, help received, aids and assistive devices, and Internet usage. While the information provided in this fact sheet pertains to adults, a brief overview of children with learning limitations is also provided.

    Release date: 2009-02-26

  • Table: 89-628-X2009013
    Description:

    The following fact sheet is a profile of Canadians 15 years of age and older, who reported having a seeing limitation. It is important to note that this includes people who are legally blind, have low vision or have milder seeing conditions. This fact sheet examines the areas of education, employment, computer usage, aids and assistive devices, and transportation.

    Release date: 2009-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210689
    Description:

    Using data from the 2007 General Social Survey, this article investigates new national level data on caregiving. It is well established that family and friends provide care to ailing seniors. Focusing on caregivers aged 45 and over, the article examines whether family and friend care differs by the type of health problem the senior has (be it physical or mental), or whether the care was provided to a senior living in a private household or care facility. We also look at who provides care to seniors, which tasks are provided and how often, how caregivers cope, and where they turn in order to seek support. Included is a profile of the seniors 65 years and over with a long-term health problem who were receiving care from these caregivers.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-581-X
    Description:

    This report briefly describes over 100 long-term medical follow-up studies covering topics over the complete life cycle including most age groups and diseases. The research projects examine delayed health outcomes in relation to occupational, environmental, lifestyle, medical and socio-economic factors.

    This inventory of projects carried out since 1978, searchable by themes, will aid in determining earlier research completed using record linkage plus national birth, cancer and death databases for Canada. It outlines the agencies involved, the main investigators at the time of the work, the size of the study population, and provides citations to published findings. This report will be useful for those who make or influence policies, regulations and medical guidelines, and carry out research that affects the health of the population at the industry, community, regional, national or international level.

    Release date: 2006-02-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028454
    Description:

    Using longitudinal data from Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey (NPHS), this article assesses the health impact of the immigration process, as individuals adjust to life in Canada, by comparing changes in immigrants' self-perceived health status, health care use, and health-related behaviours with those of the Canadian-born population. Information was collected from the same individuals over an eight-year period from 1994-1995 to 2002-2003.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20050018440
    Description:

    This summary provides highlights of an analysis that used eight years of longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994/95 to 2002/03. The analysis was part of an Internet publication Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow? Findings from the National Population Health Survey, Catalogue no. 82-618-MWE.

    The analysis found that recent immigrants from non-European countries are twice as likely as the Canadian-born to experience deterioration in their health.

    Release date: 2005-08-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048041
    Description:

    This article describes the prevalence of self-reported overweight and obesity in different ethnic groups and examines the influence of time since immigration on the prevalence of overweight within and between ethnic groups. The results are based on data from the 2000/01 and 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005247
    Description:

    This study undertakes three comparisons using Cycle 2 (1996-97) data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) in Canada. First, the study compares the health outcomes of children of the Native-born Canadian (NBC) group with those of the immigrant group in general. Differences are also investigated within the three immigrant sub-groups: the American immigrant group, the European immigrant group and Asian immigrant group. Second, this study tests the hypothesis that the children of any immigrant group in Canada would have a higher level of health outcomes for the same level of resources. Third, the study examines the association of time of residency of immigrants in different groups and the health outcomes of their children. An immigrant family is defined as one in which at least one of the parents is foreign-born. Health outcomes are measured by the PMK's (person most knowledgeable about the child) assessment of the child's health. Ordered logit models are employed for estimation. The children selected for analysis are 4 to 13 years of age.

    The NLSCY data suggest that the health outcomes of children in the immigrant families in general are similar to that in the NBC group. However, the health outcomes of the Asian immigrant group are slightly lower and those of the American immigrant group are markedly better. Except for the American immigrant group, there is evidence that the children of any other immigrant group would have lower health status for the same level of resources. Decomposition results indicate that a higher level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for markedly better outcomes for the American immigrant group; while a lower level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for the lower level of outcomes for the Asian immigrant group. On the other hand, health outcomes are higher for the European immigrant group than for the NBC group when variation in resources is considered, while lower when variation in productivity coefficients is examined. Finally, there is statistical evidence that the health status of children of immigrant families would improve with the time of residency of immigrant parents, if it were lower initially. The findings of the study indicate that present health outcomes of children in the immigrant families, on average, are not a great concern. However, those of the Asian immigrant group may be a concern.

    Release date: 2005-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-618-M2005002
    Description:

    This article compares the changes in immigrants' health status over the last decade with that of the Canadian-born population. Based on longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, the article also examines risk factors such as daily cigarette smoking, level of physical activity during leisure time and weight gain, to assess health changes while taking into account some socio-economic factors. This article is part of an Internet publication that provides links to tables, other research articles and information about the National Population Health Survey.

    Release date: 2005-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004228
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between individuals' health status and the socio-economic composition of the neighbourhoods in which they live. It combines individual microdata from Statistics Canada's 1996-97 National Population Health Survey (NPHS) with neighbourhood-level characteristics estimated from the 1996 Census of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030026807
    Description:

    The pattern of suicide among immigrants is closer to that in their countries of birth than to that of the Canadian-born population. Suicide rates of immigrants are about half those of the Canadian-born. Among immigrants, suicide rates increase with age, but among people born in Canada, rates are highest in middle age.

    Release date: 2004-03-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5004
    Release date: 2004-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009227
    Description:

    The first assesses how the fertility of immigrant women evolved between 1976-1981 and 1996-2001. It examines whether the fertility behaviour of immigrant women is tending to converge with that of Canadian-born women, and if so, how rapidly this is occurring for different immigrant groups. It also estimates the fertility of immigrants' children, the second-generation of Canadians.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-611-X
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), conducted jointly by Statistics Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada under the Policy Research Initiative, is a comprehensive survey designed to study the process by which new immigrants adapt to Canadian society. About 12,000 immigrants aged 15 and older who arrived in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001 were interviewed. By late 2005, when all three waves of interviews will have been completed, the survey will provide a better understanding of how the settlement process unfolds for new immigrants.

    The results of this survey will provide valuable information on how immigrants are meeting various challenges associated with integration and what resources are most helpful to their settlement in Canada. The main topics being investigated include housing, education, foreign credentials recognition, employment, income, the development and use of social networks, language skills, health, values and attitudes, and satisfaction with the settlement experience.

    Release date: 2003-09-04

Data (6)

Data (6) (6 of 6 results)

Analysis (23)

Analysis (23) (23 of 23 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401014099
    Description:

    This study uses the linked 2006 Census-Hospital Discharge Abstract Database to examine hospitalization during the 2004-to-2006 period, by immigrant status of Ontario seniors.

    Release date: 2014-10-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311693
    Description:

    This study describes an area-based method of calculating standardized, comparable hospitalization rates for areas with varying concentrations of foreign-born, at national and subnational levels.

    Release date: 2012-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100411559
    Description:

    With data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, this analysis examines the relationship between self-reported official language proficiency and transitions to poor self-reported health during the first four years in the country.

    Release date: 2011-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-622-X2011008
    Description:

    The 1991 to 2001 census mortality follow-up study permits analysis of the healthy immigrant effect-the dominant hypothesis in immigrant health research-by world region of birth and for different areas of Canada. This hypothesis suggests that immigrants arrive with better health than the Canadian-born population, but that this health advantage tends to disappear over time. The results of this study provide overall support for this trend. However, similar to earlier research, the analysis of age-standardized mortality rates by world region of origin, period of immigration and residence reveals underlying differences that may not be evident when only the overall results are examined.

    Release date: 2011-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201000111102
    Description:

    For many Canadians, the first point of contact for medical care is their doctor. Not having a regular medical doctor is associated with fewer visits with general practitioners or specialists, who can play a role in screening and treating medical conditions early. Over the past decade, the percentage of Canadians who report having a regular medical doctor has declined.

    Release date: 2010-04-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-229-X
    Description:

    This report examines the health of Canadians by focusing on demography, health status, health behaviours, and the environment. The aging of the population provides a context for the report. Measures that reflect physical, mental and social well-being are presented, followed by indicators of positive and negative behaviours that are known to influence health status. Finally, indicators of the social and physical environments in which we live and work are examined. Together, these Health Indicators highlight the health of Canadians at a national and provincial/territorial level. They provide benchmarks for comparisons over time and place, from regional to international levels.

    This report celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Health Indicators project. Since 1999, Statistics Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information have collaborated on developing and providing a broad range of indicators for health regions across Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210689
    Description:

    Using data from the 2007 General Social Survey, this article investigates new national level data on caregiving. It is well established that family and friends provide care to ailing seniors. Focusing on caregivers aged 45 and over, the article examines whether family and friend care differs by the type of health problem the senior has (be it physical or mental), or whether the care was provided to a senior living in a private household or care facility. We also look at who provides care to seniors, which tasks are provided and how often, how caregivers cope, and where they turn in order to seek support. Included is a profile of the seniors 65 years and over with a long-term health problem who were receiving care from these caregivers.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-581-X
    Description:

    This report briefly describes over 100 long-term medical follow-up studies covering topics over the complete life cycle including most age groups and diseases. The research projects examine delayed health outcomes in relation to occupational, environmental, lifestyle, medical and socio-economic factors.

    This inventory of projects carried out since 1978, searchable by themes, will aid in determining earlier research completed using record linkage plus national birth, cancer and death databases for Canada. It outlines the agencies involved, the main investigators at the time of the work, the size of the study population, and provides citations to published findings. This report will be useful for those who make or influence policies, regulations and medical guidelines, and carry out research that affects the health of the population at the industry, community, regional, national or international level.

    Release date: 2006-02-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028454
    Description:

    Using longitudinal data from Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey (NPHS), this article assesses the health impact of the immigration process, as individuals adjust to life in Canada, by comparing changes in immigrants' self-perceived health status, health care use, and health-related behaviours with those of the Canadian-born population. Information was collected from the same individuals over an eight-year period from 1994-1995 to 2002-2003.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20050018440
    Description:

    This summary provides highlights of an analysis that used eight years of longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994/95 to 2002/03. The analysis was part of an Internet publication Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow? Findings from the National Population Health Survey, Catalogue no. 82-618-MWE.

    The analysis found that recent immigrants from non-European countries are twice as likely as the Canadian-born to experience deterioration in their health.

    Release date: 2005-08-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048041
    Description:

    This article describes the prevalence of self-reported overweight and obesity in different ethnic groups and examines the influence of time since immigration on the prevalence of overweight within and between ethnic groups. The results are based on data from the 2000/01 and 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005247
    Description:

    This study undertakes three comparisons using Cycle 2 (1996-97) data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) in Canada. First, the study compares the health outcomes of children of the Native-born Canadian (NBC) group with those of the immigrant group in general. Differences are also investigated within the three immigrant sub-groups: the American immigrant group, the European immigrant group and Asian immigrant group. Second, this study tests the hypothesis that the children of any immigrant group in Canada would have a higher level of health outcomes for the same level of resources. Third, the study examines the association of time of residency of immigrants in different groups and the health outcomes of their children. An immigrant family is defined as one in which at least one of the parents is foreign-born. Health outcomes are measured by the PMK's (person most knowledgeable about the child) assessment of the child's health. Ordered logit models are employed for estimation. The children selected for analysis are 4 to 13 years of age.

    The NLSCY data suggest that the health outcomes of children in the immigrant families in general are similar to that in the NBC group. However, the health outcomes of the Asian immigrant group are slightly lower and those of the American immigrant group are markedly better. Except for the American immigrant group, there is evidence that the children of any other immigrant group would have lower health status for the same level of resources. Decomposition results indicate that a higher level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for markedly better outcomes for the American immigrant group; while a lower level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for the lower level of outcomes for the Asian immigrant group. On the other hand, health outcomes are higher for the European immigrant group than for the NBC group when variation in resources is considered, while lower when variation in productivity coefficients is examined. Finally, there is statistical evidence that the health status of children of immigrant families would improve with the time of residency of immigrant parents, if it were lower initially. The findings of the study indicate that present health outcomes of children in the immigrant families, on average, are not a great concern. However, those of the Asian immigrant group may be a concern.

    Release date: 2005-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-618-M2005002
    Description:

    This article compares the changes in immigrants' health status over the last decade with that of the Canadian-born population. Based on longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, the article also examines risk factors such as daily cigarette smoking, level of physical activity during leisure time and weight gain, to assess health changes while taking into account some socio-economic factors. This article is part of an Internet publication that provides links to tables, other research articles and information about the National Population Health Survey.

    Release date: 2005-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004228
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between individuals' health status and the socio-economic composition of the neighbourhoods in which they live. It combines individual microdata from Statistics Canada's 1996-97 National Population Health Survey (NPHS) with neighbourhood-level characteristics estimated from the 1996 Census of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030026807
    Description:

    The pattern of suicide among immigrants is closer to that in their countries of birth than to that of the Canadian-born population. Suicide rates of immigrants are about half those of the Canadian-born. Among immigrants, suicide rates increase with age, but among people born in Canada, rates are highest in middle age.

    Release date: 2004-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009227
    Description:

    The first assesses how the fertility of immigrant women evolved between 1976-1981 and 1996-2001. It examines whether the fertility behaviour of immigrant women is tending to converge with that of Canadian-born women, and if so, how rapidly this is occurring for different immigrant groups. It also estimates the fertility of immigrants' children, the second-generation of Canadians.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S2002001
    Description:

    This is the third in the series of annual reports published by Statistics Canada on the health of Canadians. This supplement highlights communities, with new information that is mainly from the 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). Communities are viewed from several perspectives: geographically, with analyses of the health regions that have been created by provincial health departments; culturally, with articles examining two specific communities-Aboriginal Canadians living off-reserve and immigrants; and socio-economically, with studies of urban neighbourhoods defined by their level of income.

    Canada's 139 health regions are grouped into 10 "peer groups" with similar socio-demographic profiles. Health outcomes and risk factors are compared among and within peer groups.

    Life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy estimates are based on data from the 1996 Census of Canada and the Canadian Vital Statistics Database. Risk factor estimates are based on data from the 2000/01 CCHS.

    Release date: 2002-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X2002101
    Description:

    This is the third in the series of annual reports published by Statistics Canada on the health of Canadians. This supplement highlights communities, with new information that is mainly from the 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). Communities are viewed from several perspectives: geographically, with analyses of the health regions that have been created by provincial health departments; culturally, with articles examining two specific communities-Aboriginal Canadians living off-reserve and immigrants; and socio-economically, with studies of urban neighbourhoods defined by their level of income.

    Canada's 139 health regions are grouped into 10 "peer groups" with similar socio-demographic profiles. Health outcomes and risk factors are compared among and within peer groups.

    Life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy estimates are based on data from the 1996 Census of Canada and the Canadian Vital Statistics Database. Risk factor estimates are based on data from the 2000/01 CCHS.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016336
    Description:

    This paper compares immigrants with the Canadian-born population in terms of depression and alcohol dependence. It explores whether the 'healthy immigrant effect' observed for physical health also holds true for mental health. Several sources of diversity among immigrants are also considered.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016335
    Description:

    This article compares the health of immigrants at different times since immigration with that of the Canadian-born population, in terms of chronic conditions in general, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer. Health behaviour outcomes are also explored, as is their role in explaining observed health outcomes.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5004
    Release date: 2004-03-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-611-X
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), conducted jointly by Statistics Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada under the Policy Research Initiative, is a comprehensive survey designed to study the process by which new immigrants adapt to Canadian society. About 12,000 immigrants aged 15 and older who arrived in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001 were interviewed. By late 2005, when all three waves of interviews will have been completed, the survey will provide a better understanding of how the settlement process unfolds for new immigrants.

    The results of this survey will provide valuable information on how immigrants are meeting various challenges associated with integration and what resources are most helpful to their settlement in Canada. The main topics being investigated include housing, education, foreign credentials recognition, employment, income, the development and use of social networks, language skills, health, values and attitudes, and satisfaction with the settlement experience.

    Release date: 2003-09-04

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