Statistics by subject – Integration of newcomers

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2016002
    Description:

    This study examines the settlement patterns of the immigrant population as well as certain social integration components. It starts by outlining recent trends in the settlement patterns of the immigrant population in Canadian census metropolitan areas, namely Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. Based on data from the 2013 General Social Survey on Social Identity, it then looks at residence characteristics, such as type of municipality and concentration of immigrant population, according to four social integration components: personal network characteristics, relationships with neighbours, social participation and involvement in community activities, and sense of belonging.

    Release date: 2017-05-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-05-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016383
    Description:

    This study assesses immigrants’ acculturation profiles as measured by their sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It first examines the relative distribution of immigrants who have a strong sense of belonging to both Canada and their source country; a strong sense of belonging to Canada only; a strong sense of belonging to their source country only; and a weak sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It further examines four sets of determinants of these acculturation profiles, including source-country socioeconomic and cultural characteristics, immigration entry status, post-migration experience, and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2016-10-18

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-01-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-01-22

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-01-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-01-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-01-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-01-18

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-01-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114299
    Description:

    This article provides information about the number and characteristics of international students in Canada, and about their rate of transition into permanent residence. The article also examines the extent to which the transition rate varied across characteristics and cohorts, and whether these variations affected the profile of immigrants who are former international students. It does so by using a new administrative database—the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD).

    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114217
    Description:

    Over the last century, millions of women, either alone or with their families, have travelled from abroad to make Canada their home. These newcomers form a diverse group, arriving from regions spanning the globe and speaking close to 200 languages between them. As newcomers to Canada, the socio-demographic profile of immigrant women in Canada differs from that of the Canadian-born population in some ways, while it is relatively similar in others. This chapter compares these two socio-demographic profiles from a gender-based perspective. It also discusses changing trends in immigration, and the influence of these trends on the demographic characteristics of the immigrant population in Canada.

    Release date: 2015-10-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114221
    Description:

    This article examines the differences in the location of study of immigrant adults aged 25 to 64 with a university education (i.e., with at least a bachelor’s degree). It provides results by period of immigration (pre-1990, the 1990s, and the 2000s) and provides a more in-depth analysis of factors that are linked to the location of study for the most recent cohort of immigrants (i.e., those who immigrated in 2000 or later).

    Release date: 2015-09-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013032
    Description:

    This article addresses three questions: (1) What were the employment dynamics of a specific cohort of immigrant and native-born workers over the 20 years from 1991 to 2010? (2) To what extent did initial differences in earnings and pension coverage between the two groups narrow during this period? (3) Which factors were associated with the narrowing of these differences? The data are from the linked Census 1991-Longitudinal Worker File and pertain to real annual wages and salaries and pension coverage of immigrants aged 25 to 34 in 1991 who arrived in Canada from 1985 to 1990 and native-born workers of the same age.

    Release date: 2013-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111669
    Description:

    This article examines donating and volunteering among immigrants in Canada: their reasons for doing so or not, the amounts of money and time they give and the types of organizations that they support. It compares immigrants to other Canadians and considers how the philanthropic behaviour of immigrants changes as they establish themselves in Canada. The data are from the 2010 Survey of Giving Volunteering and Participating.

    Release date: 2012-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011336
    Description:

    This paper examines the education outcomes (including the chances of being a high school drop-out) of a cohort of immigrants who arrived in Canada as children using the 2006 Census. The research documents the degree to which high school graduation for immigrant children may change discretely after a particular age at arrival in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913257
    Description:

    Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, this study sheds light on a specific aspect of newcomers' settlement-recognition of their foreign credentials and work experience in relation to their individual characteristics. These characteristics range from class of immigrant (skilled-worker principal applicants, family class, refugees, etc.), education and field of study to country where the highest credential was earned, and knowledge of English or French. The study also examines foreign credential and work experience recognition at three time points over a four-year period-six months, two years and four years after landing.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010322
    Description:

    In this paper, the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) is used to examine how immigrants in the 2000-2001 landing cohort subjectively assess their life in Canada. The paper provides a useful complement to other studies of immigrant outcomes that often focus on employment, income or health. Four years after landing, about three-quarters of LSIC respondents said they were satisfied or very satisfied with their life in Canada, and a comparable proportion said their expectations of life in Canada had been met or exceeded. Nearly 9 out of 10 said that, if given the chance, they would make the same decision again to come to Canada. A broad range of demographic, social and economic characteristics are associated with subjective assessments. Positive assessments of life in Canada are less prevalent among individuals in their thirties and forties, and university graduates and principal applicants in the skilled worker admission category, than they are among other groups. While assessments of life in Canada are correlated with economic factors such as personal income, they are also correlated with social factors such as relationships with neighbours and perceptions of discrimination.

    Release date: 2010-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810113201
    Description:

    Where immigrants choose to settle appears to have an impact on their economic integration. It is much faster outside the large urban centres. In the larger urban centres, immigrants face a large initial income disadvantage and subsequent increases are not enough for them to achieve parity with other Canadians. Better economic integration of immigrants outside the larger urban centres is found even after taking into consideration differences in education, ability in an official language, admission class and country of origin.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711013196
    Description:

    Challenges associated with the integration of immigrants often extend beyond the first generation. If children of immigrants experience similar impediments to social and economic assimilation as their parents did, then low socioeconomic status may be transmitted between generations. Such scenarios of second-class disadvantage may not apply to Canada. Even if immigrant earnings deficits relative to the native-born are increasing, it does not necessarily mean that children of immigrants will be worse off than the children of Canadian-born parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-19

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