Statistics by subject – Visible minorities

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Analysis (43)

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  • Journals and periodicals: 91-551-X
    Description:

    These analytical products present projections of the diversity of the Canadian population. The purpose of these projections is to paint a potential portrait of the composition of Canada’s population according to different ethnocultural and language characteristics, if certain population growth scenarios were to become reality in the future. Produced using Demosim, a microsimulation model, these projections cover characteristics such as place of birth, generation status, visible minority group, religion and mother tongue.

    Release date: 2017-01-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-01-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016383
    Description:

    This study assesses immigrants’ acculturation profiles as measured by their sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It first examines the relative distribution of immigrants who have a strong sense of belonging to both Canada and their source country; a strong sense of belonging to Canada only; a strong sense of belonging to their source country only; and a weak sense of belonging to Canada and their source country. It further examines four sets of determinants of these acculturation profiles, including source-country socioeconomic and cultural characteristics, immigration entry status, post-migration experience, and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2016-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114217
    Description:

    Over the last century, millions of women, either alone or with their families, have travelled from abroad to make Canada their home. These newcomers form a diverse group, arriving from regions spanning the globe and speaking close to 200 languages between them. As newcomers to Canada, the socio-demographic profile of immigrant women in Canada differs from that of the Canadian-born population in some ways, while it is relatively similar in others. This chapter compares these two socio-demographic profiles from a gender-based perspective. It also discusses changing trends in immigration, and the influence of these trends on the demographic characteristics of the immigrant population in Canada.

    Release date: 2015-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-629-X2015032
    Description:

    A look at immigration and diversity in Canada, based on the Demosim Population Projections Program.

    Release date: 2015-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200801010730
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a socio-demographic profile of police officers and individuals working in private security occupations. Using the Census of Population and Housing from 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006 as the primary data sources, employment figures for those working in private security and public policing occupations are provided. Other characteristics of these occupational groups such as gender, age, education, visible minority and Aboriginal status as well as income are also included. The traditional and emerging roles of public police and private security personnel, as well as the systems of governance under which each operates are also discussed.

    Release date: 2008-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008015
    Description:

    Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and self-reported data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, this profile examines certain socio-demographic and economic characteristics of visible minorities in Canada followed by an analysis of the rates and characteristics of violent crimes involving visible minority victims. It also provides information on visible minorities perceptions of safety, discrimination and of the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2008-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038966
    Description:

    Studies of the postsecondary attainment of young adults are informative, but it is also useful to examine the educational aspirations of teenagers. Such studies profile the value placed on different types of formal education by youth as well as perceived opportunities for upward occupational mobility. This article explores the educational aspirations of 15-year-old visible minority immigrant students and compares them with those of Canadian-born youth who are not part of a visible minority group. It then identifies the most important factors that explain the large ethnocultural differences in university aspirations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-541-X
    Description:

    This report presents the main results of population projections according to some ethnocultural variables (visible minority group, immigrant status, religion, mother tongue) for Canada, provinces and selected metropolitan areas. Based on the January 1st 2001 estimation of the permanent resident population, results of five projection scenarios from a micro-simulation model that take into account differentials in behaviors and intergenerational transfers are presented for the years 2001 to 2017.

    Release date: 2005-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047778
    Description:

    Chinese in Canada now comprise the country's largest visible minority group, surpassing one million for the first time, following successive waves of immigration. They are a diverse group, reporting a variety of countries of birth, mother tongues, home languages and religious affiliation. But they are linked by a common ethnicity. And while earlier Chinese immigrants came as manual labourers, recent arrivals tend to come with education and human capital. This article examines the history of the Chinese in Canada, its diverse population and its contribution to the nation's rich multicultural mosaic.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005241
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of ethnic neighbourhoods on wage growth as well as other labour market outcomes of immigrant men in Canada using the 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1996 Censuses. While the primary measure of affiliation is country of birth, ethnicity, language and visible minority status are also examined to determine the robustness of the findings. Consistent with U.S. findings, ethnic neighbourhoods based on country of birth are found to have a negative impact on the ten-year wage growth of immigrants. Further, the model for wage growth is found to be robust to different lengths of time and different base years as well as the specification of language and ethnicity as the affiliation grouping. Using country of birth as the affiliation index, exposure is also found to have a negative impact on the growth of total and weekly earnings as well as the initial wages of entry cohorts. While little evidence is found on the effects of ethnic neighbourhoods on changes in employment, a negative effect of exposure is found on entry employment rates of the most recent landing cohorts. Although the overall effect of ethnic neighbourhoods on wage growth is negative, ethnic neighbourhoods are found to have a divergent effect on different landing cohorts, having a positive impact on the wage growth of the more recent cohorts and a negative impact on earlier cohorts.

    Release date: 2005-02-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 96-326-X
    Description:

    This work is an updated version of a study published under the same title following the population censuses of 1991 and 1996. The text and tables have been adapted to reflect the more complete data from the 2001 Census, in which the usual questions on knowledge of languages, mother tongue, and language spoken 'most often' at home are supplemented by a question on languages spoken 'regularly' at home , and a two-part question on language use at work, that is, the language used 'most often,' and other languages used 'regularly,' in the workplace. This enrichment of the content has allowed us to expand our analysis while remaining true to the initial goal of presenting in a straightfoward manner basic statistics on the country's demolinguistic reality.

    Release date: 2004-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004233
    Description:

    In Canada's federal system for economic (skilled) class immigrant selection, education is treated as if it is homogeneous and only differs in quantity. Some provinces, however, differentiate based on postsecondary field of study. This study explores the economic implications of field of study for each sex, and for two subgroups of immigrants, those educated in Canada and those educated elsewhere .

    Field of study is not observed to explain much of the earnings difference between immigrants and the Canadian born, though it is relatively more important for males than females in doing so. Interestingly, while there are a few exceptions, a general pattern is observed whereby the differences between high- and low-earning fields are not as large for immigrants as for the Canadian born. Similarly, social assistance receipt has smaller variance across fields for immigrants than for the Canadian born. Nevertheless, substantial inter-field differences are observed for each immigrant group.

    Release date: 2004-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004229
    Description:

    This study examines trends in the internal migration of the Canadian-born and long-term immigrants into and out of Canada's three largest metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004221
    Description:

    This study examines the expansion of visible minority neighbourhoods in Canada's three largest metropolitan areas from 1981 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-07-02

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2004004
    Description:

    Immigrants make up a much smaller portion of the population in rural regions than in urban areas. Recent immigrants are even less likely to be found in rural regions. However, according to this bulletin, immigrants living in rural regions had higher levels of education in 1996, a higher rate of employment, and were more likely to work in professional services.

    Release date: 2004-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410413117
    Description:

    This paper examines the economic challenges of moving to a new country.

    Release date: 2004-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016874
    Description:

    This article (1) examines employment and unemployment rates of visible and non-visible minority groups, (2) compares Canadian-born and foreign-born visible minorities with their non-visible minority counterparts and (3) examines employment and unemployment rates separately by gender.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

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