Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (4)

All (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-001-X20070019644
    Description:

    The North American experience with international migration stands in unique contrast to much of the rest of the world. This paper uses microdata drawn from the national censuses of Canada, the United States, and Mexico, and applies the same methodological framework to these data to examine the impact of international migration on the labour market. We find a numerically comparable and statistically significant inverse relation between immigrant-induced shifts in labour supply and wages in each of the three countries: A 10% labour supply shift is associated with about a 3% to 4% opposite-signed change in wages. Despite the similarity in the wage elasticity, the impact of international migration on the wage structure differs significantly across countries. In Canada, international migration substantially narrowed wage inequality because immigrants in Canada tend to be disproportionately high-skilled. In the United States, international migration substantially increased wage inequality because immigrants in the United States tend to be disproportionately low-skilled. In Mexico, however, emigration rates are highest in the middle of the skill distribution and lowest at the extremes. As a result, international migration greatly increased relative wages in the middle of the Mexican skill distribution and lowered relative wages at the extremes. Paradoxically, the large-scale migration of workers from Mexico may have slightly reduced the relative wage of the low-skill workers remaining in that country.

    Release date: 2007-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070029571
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016336
    Description:

    This paper compares immigrants with the Canadian-born population in terms of depression and alcohol dependence. It explores whether the 'healthy immigrant effect' observed for physical health also holds true for mental health. Several sources of diversity among immigrants are also considered.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

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Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-001-X20070019644
    Description:

    The North American experience with international migration stands in unique contrast to much of the rest of the world. This paper uses microdata drawn from the national censuses of Canada, the United States, and Mexico, and applies the same methodological framework to these data to examine the impact of international migration on the labour market. We find a numerically comparable and statistically significant inverse relation between immigrant-induced shifts in labour supply and wages in each of the three countries: A 10% labour supply shift is associated with about a 3% to 4% opposite-signed change in wages. Despite the similarity in the wage elasticity, the impact of international migration on the wage structure differs significantly across countries. In Canada, international migration substantially narrowed wage inequality because immigrants in Canada tend to be disproportionately high-skilled. In the United States, international migration substantially increased wage inequality because immigrants in the United States tend to be disproportionately low-skilled. In Mexico, however, emigration rates are highest in the middle of the skill distribution and lowest at the extremes. As a result, international migration greatly increased relative wages in the middle of the Mexican skill distribution and lowered relative wages at the extremes. Paradoxically, the large-scale migration of workers from Mexico may have slightly reduced the relative wage of the low-skill workers remaining in that country.

    Release date: 2007-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070029571
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016336
    Description:

    This paper compares immigrants with the Canadian-born population in terms of depression and alcohol dependence. It explores whether the 'healthy immigrant effect' observed for physical health also holds true for mental health. Several sources of diversity among immigrants are also considered.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

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