Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (13)

All (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810113201
    Description:

    Where immigrants choose to settle appears to have an impact on their economic integration. It is much faster outside the large urban centres. In the larger urban centres, immigrants face a large initial income disadvantage and subsequent increases are not enough for them to achieve parity with other Canadians. Better economic integration of immigrants outside the larger urban centres is found even after taking into consideration differences in education, ability in an official language, admission class and country of origin.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410312
    Description:

    In recent years, the media have highlighted the particular difficulty of foreign-trained physicians who are unable to practice medicine in Canada. Foreign-trained engineers are another professional group encountering similar difficulties in practicing their profession. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population, this article documents the extent to which foreign trained physicians and engineers are not employed in the occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20040018734
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey generated methodological challenges like choosing the sampling plan, developing the questionnaire, collecting the data, weighting the data and estimating the variance.

    Release date: 2005-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028454
    Description:

    Using longitudinal data from Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey (NPHS), this article assesses the health impact of the immigration process, as individuals adjust to life in Canada, by comparing changes in immigrants' self-perceived health status, health care use, and health-related behaviours with those of the Canadian-born population. Information was collected from the same individuals over an eight-year period from 1994-1995 to 2002-2003.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20050018440
    Description:

    This summary provides highlights of an analysis that used eight years of longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994/95 to 2002/03. The analysis was part of an Internet publication Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow? Findings from the National Population Health Survey, Catalogue no. 82-618-MWE.

    The analysis found that recent immigrants from non-European countries are twice as likely as the Canadian-born to experience deterioration in their health.

    Release date: 2005-08-05

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009227
    Description:

    The first assesses how the fertility of immigrant women evolved between 1976-1981 and 1996-2001. It examines whether the fertility behaviour of immigrant women is tending to converge with that of Canadian-born women, and if so, how rapidly this is occurring for different immigrant groups. It also estimates the fertility of immigrants' children, the second-generation of Canadians.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026623
    Description:

    Canada has become increasingly multiethnic and multicultural. Immigration over the past 100 years has shaped the country, and each new wave of immigrants has added to the nation's ethnic and cultural diversity. At the time of the 2001 Census, immigrants represented the highest proportion of the population in 70 years, and immigration accounted for more than two-thirds of the population growth in that year. This article explores the changing composition of Canada's immigrants and visible minority groups over the past number of decades.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000025164
    Description:

    This article looks at the changes in immigration to Canada during the 20th century.

    Release date: 2000-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044420
    Description:

    This article explores the labour market experiences of recent immigrants in the 25- to 44-year age group from 1986 to 1996.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19950009311
    Description:

    The 1990 report compared the situation of the Canadian population with that of the United States, Canada's historical partner in the settlement of North America, showing their similarities and differences and how each has developed over time. Continuing in the same vein, the 1993 report described the Mexican situation in comparison with the population of Canada. It seemed worthwhile to consider why and how Canada's two most densely populated provinces, Quebec and Ontario, are alike and differ.

    Release date: 1996-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042287
    Description:

    Immigrant workers are over-represented in "product fabricating" occupations, which include, for example, garment workers and mechanics. This profile of immigrants in fabricating jobs looks at age, education, period of immigration and knowledge of English or French. It also compared the employment income of immigrant and non-immigrant workers in product fabricating occupations.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

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Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810113201
    Description:

    Where immigrants choose to settle appears to have an impact on their economic integration. It is much faster outside the large urban centres. In the larger urban centres, immigrants face a large initial income disadvantage and subsequent increases are not enough for them to achieve parity with other Canadians. Better economic integration of immigrants outside the larger urban centres is found even after taking into consideration differences in education, ability in an official language, admission class and country of origin.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410312
    Description:

    In recent years, the media have highlighted the particular difficulty of foreign-trained physicians who are unable to practice medicine in Canada. Foreign-trained engineers are another professional group encountering similar difficulties in practicing their profession. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population, this article documents the extent to which foreign trained physicians and engineers are not employed in the occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028454
    Description:

    Using longitudinal data from Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey (NPHS), this article assesses the health impact of the immigration process, as individuals adjust to life in Canada, by comparing changes in immigrants' self-perceived health status, health care use, and health-related behaviours with those of the Canadian-born population. Information was collected from the same individuals over an eight-year period from 1994-1995 to 2002-2003.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20050018440
    Description:

    This summary provides highlights of an analysis that used eight years of longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994/95 to 2002/03. The analysis was part of an Internet publication Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow? Findings from the National Population Health Survey, Catalogue no. 82-618-MWE.

    The analysis found that recent immigrants from non-European countries are twice as likely as the Canadian-born to experience deterioration in their health.

    Release date: 2005-08-05

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009227
    Description:

    The first assesses how the fertility of immigrant women evolved between 1976-1981 and 1996-2001. It examines whether the fertility behaviour of immigrant women is tending to converge with that of Canadian-born women, and if so, how rapidly this is occurring for different immigrant groups. It also estimates the fertility of immigrants' children, the second-generation of Canadians.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026623
    Description:

    Canada has become increasingly multiethnic and multicultural. Immigration over the past 100 years has shaped the country, and each new wave of immigrants has added to the nation's ethnic and cultural diversity. At the time of the 2001 Census, immigrants represented the highest proportion of the population in 70 years, and immigration accounted for more than two-thirds of the population growth in that year. This article explores the changing composition of Canada's immigrants and visible minority groups over the past number of decades.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000025164
    Description:

    This article looks at the changes in immigration to Canada during the 20th century.

    Release date: 2000-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044420
    Description:

    This article explores the labour market experiences of recent immigrants in the 25- to 44-year age group from 1986 to 1996.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19950009311
    Description:

    The 1990 report compared the situation of the Canadian population with that of the United States, Canada's historical partner in the settlement of North America, showing their similarities and differences and how each has developed over time. Continuing in the same vein, the 1993 report described the Mexican situation in comparison with the population of Canada. It seemed worthwhile to consider why and how Canada's two most densely populated provinces, Quebec and Ontario, are alike and differ.

    Release date: 1996-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042287
    Description:

    Immigrant workers are over-represented in "product fabricating" occupations, which include, for example, garment workers and mechanics. This profile of immigrants in fabricating jobs looks at age, education, period of immigration and knowledge of English or French. It also compared the employment income of immigrant and non-immigrant workers in product fabricating occupations.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

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Reference (1) (1 result)

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