Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (19)

All (19) (19 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114345
    Description:

    This article analyzes the impact of immigration on the size and ethnocultural composition of future cohorts of seniors in Canada, using data from the Population Estimates Program, the Population Projections Program and other sources of demographic data.

    Release date: 2016-03-09

  • Table: 99-010-X201100311791
    Description:

    These three short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Generation status: Canadian-born children of immigrants, the second, Obtaining Canadian citizenship and the third, Mixed unions in Canada.

    Release date: 2013-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311693
    Description:

    This study describes an area-based method of calculating standardized, comparable hospitalization rates for areas with varying concentrations of foreign-born, at national and subnational levels.

    Release date: 2012-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111528
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the immigrant women in Canada. Drawing data from the censuses and administrative sources, the chapter looked at the socio-demographic trends of the female population who came to live in Canada as immigrants. The information included growth and geographic distribution of the female immigrant population, the changing make-up of immigrant women in terms of their language profile, country of birth and visible minority status, as well as the categories under which female permanent residents were admitted to Canada. The socio-economic conditions of immigrant women, such as educational attainment, field of study, occupational group, labour market participation, earnings and component of income were examined and compared with women who were born in Canada. While census was the main data source for the analysis of the population's socio-economic situations, where applicable, data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Immigration Data Base were also included.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210689
    Description:

    Using data from the 2007 General Social Survey, this article investigates new national level data on caregiving. It is well established that family and friends provide care to ailing seniors. Focusing on caregivers aged 45 and over, the article examines whether family and friend care differs by the type of health problem the senior has (be it physical or mental), or whether the care was provided to a senior living in a private household or care facility. We also look at who provides care to seniors, which tasks are provided and how often, how caregivers cope, and where they turn in order to seek support. Included is a profile of the seniors 65 years and over with a long-term health problem who were receiving care from these caregivers.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019181
    Description:

    This article uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) and the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) to track the religious views and practices of Canadians and identify those groups most likely to be religious. An index of religiosity is developed based on the presence of religious affiliation, frequency of attendance at religious services, frequency of private religious practices and the importance of religion to the respondent.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047778
    Description:

    Chinese in Canada now comprise the country's largest visible minority group, surpassing one million for the first time, following successive waves of immigration. They are a diverse group, reporting a variety of countries of birth, mother tongues, home languages and religious affiliation. But they are linked by a common ethnicity. And while earlier Chinese immigrants came as manual labourers, recent arrivals tend to come with education and human capital. This article examines the history of the Chinese in Canada, its diverse population and its contribution to the nation's rich multicultural mosaic.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047775
    Description:

    Canada has a large and varied immigrant population, a diverse culture and vast distances. But whether individuals are Canadian citizens by birth or by naturalization, they are granted the same rights and responsibilities. Canadian citizenship may thus be viewed as something that creates a shared sense of belonging or an indication of allegiance to Canada. For the foreign-born, acquiring citizenship may be symbolic of the final stage of the migration process, their inclusion into the electoral process and a declaration of their commitment to Canada, their adopted homeland.

    This study explores the characteristics associated with becoming a Canadian citizen among immigrants who have resided in Canada for various periods of time.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030026807
    Description:

    The pattern of suicide among immigrants is closer to that in their countries of birth than to that of the Canadian-born population. Suicide rates of immigrants are about half those of the Canadian-born. Among immigrants, suicide rates increase with age, but among people born in Canada, rates are highest in middle age.

    Release date: 2004-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026633
    Description:

    This article looks at the early employment experiences of three groups of working age immigrants: those who arrived in 1981, in 1991 and in 1996.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024660
    Description:

    This article examines Canada's growing visible minority population in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011778
    Description:

    Immigration is a major source of new workers. This article profiles Canada's "newest" workers and compares their characteristics with those of Canadian-born workers.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199300438
    Description:

    This article explains Statistics Canada's role in furnishing benchmark data for employment equity purposes.

    Release date: 1993-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X1991002158
    Description:

    In 1986, visible minorities accounted for 6% of the Canadian labour force. Since then, visible minorities have accounted for an increasing share of immigration. This article profiles visible minorities in the labour market using the 1986 Census.

    Release date: 1991-05-15

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 99-010-X201100311791
    Description:

    These three short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Generation status: Canadian-born children of immigrants, the second, Obtaining Canadian citizenship and the third, Mixed unions in Canada.

    Release date: 2013-05-08

Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114345
    Description:

    This article analyzes the impact of immigration on the size and ethnocultural composition of future cohorts of seniors in Canada, using data from the Population Estimates Program, the Population Projections Program and other sources of demographic data.

    Release date: 2016-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311693
    Description:

    This study describes an area-based method of calculating standardized, comparable hospitalization rates for areas with varying concentrations of foreign-born, at national and subnational levels.

    Release date: 2012-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111528
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the immigrant women in Canada. Drawing data from the censuses and administrative sources, the chapter looked at the socio-demographic trends of the female population who came to live in Canada as immigrants. The information included growth and geographic distribution of the female immigrant population, the changing make-up of immigrant women in terms of their language profile, country of birth and visible minority status, as well as the categories under which female permanent residents were admitted to Canada. The socio-economic conditions of immigrant women, such as educational attainment, field of study, occupational group, labour market participation, earnings and component of income were examined and compared with women who were born in Canada. While census was the main data source for the analysis of the population's socio-economic situations, where applicable, data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Immigration Data Base were also included.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210689
    Description:

    Using data from the 2007 General Social Survey, this article investigates new national level data on caregiving. It is well established that family and friends provide care to ailing seniors. Focusing on caregivers aged 45 and over, the article examines whether family and friend care differs by the type of health problem the senior has (be it physical or mental), or whether the care was provided to a senior living in a private household or care facility. We also look at who provides care to seniors, which tasks are provided and how often, how caregivers cope, and where they turn in order to seek support. Included is a profile of the seniors 65 years and over with a long-term health problem who were receiving care from these caregivers.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019181
    Description:

    This article uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) and the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) to track the religious views and practices of Canadians and identify those groups most likely to be religious. An index of religiosity is developed based on the presence of religious affiliation, frequency of attendance at religious services, frequency of private religious practices and the importance of religion to the respondent.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047778
    Description:

    Chinese in Canada now comprise the country's largest visible minority group, surpassing one million for the first time, following successive waves of immigration. They are a diverse group, reporting a variety of countries of birth, mother tongues, home languages and religious affiliation. But they are linked by a common ethnicity. And while earlier Chinese immigrants came as manual labourers, recent arrivals tend to come with education and human capital. This article examines the history of the Chinese in Canada, its diverse population and its contribution to the nation's rich multicultural mosaic.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047775
    Description:

    Canada has a large and varied immigrant population, a diverse culture and vast distances. But whether individuals are Canadian citizens by birth or by naturalization, they are granted the same rights and responsibilities. Canadian citizenship may thus be viewed as something that creates a shared sense of belonging or an indication of allegiance to Canada. For the foreign-born, acquiring citizenship may be symbolic of the final stage of the migration process, their inclusion into the electoral process and a declaration of their commitment to Canada, their adopted homeland.

    This study explores the characteristics associated with becoming a Canadian citizen among immigrants who have resided in Canada for various periods of time.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030026807
    Description:

    The pattern of suicide among immigrants is closer to that in their countries of birth than to that of the Canadian-born population. Suicide rates of immigrants are about half those of the Canadian-born. Among immigrants, suicide rates increase with age, but among people born in Canada, rates are highest in middle age.

    Release date: 2004-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026633
    Description:

    This article looks at the early employment experiences of three groups of working age immigrants: those who arrived in 1981, in 1991 and in 1996.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024660
    Description:

    This article examines Canada's growing visible minority population in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011778
    Description:

    Immigration is a major source of new workers. This article profiles Canada's "newest" workers and compares their characteristics with those of Canadian-born workers.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199300438
    Description:

    This article explains Statistics Canada's role in furnishing benchmark data for employment equity purposes.

    Release date: 1993-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X1991002158
    Description:

    In 1986, visible minorities accounted for 6% of the Canadian labour force. Since then, visible minorities have accounted for an increasing share of immigration. This article profiles visible minorities in the labour market using the 1986 Census.

    Release date: 1991-05-15

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