Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (17)

All (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114299
    Description:

    This article provides information about the number and characteristics of international students in Canada, and about their rate of transition into permanent residence. The article also examines the extent to which the transition rate varied across characteristics and cohorts, and whether these variations affected the profile of immigrants who are former international students. It does so by using a new administrative database—the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD).

    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114247
    Description:

    This article examines regional differences in the math and reading skills of immigrant children aged 15 based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). It also examines regional differences in high-school and university completion rates among young immigrants who came to Canada before the age of 15 using National Household Survey (NHS) data. Throughout the article, comparisons are made with the children of the Canadian-born (third- or higher-generation Canadians).

    Release date: 2015-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114217
    Description:

    Over the last century, millions of women, either alone or with their families, have travelled from abroad to make Canada their home. These newcomers form a diverse group, arriving from regions spanning the globe and speaking close to 200 languages between them. As newcomers to Canada, the socio-demographic profile of immigrant women in Canada differs from that of the Canadian-born population in some ways, while it is relatively similar in others. This chapter compares these two socio-demographic profiles from a gender-based perspective. It also discusses changing trends in immigration, and the influence of these trends on the demographic characteristics of the immigrant population in Canada.

    Release date: 2015-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114221
    Description:

    This article examines the differences in the location of study of immigrant adults aged 25 to 64 with a university education (i.e., with at least a bachelor’s degree). It provides results by period of immigration (pre-1990, the 1990s, and the 2000s) and provides a more in-depth analysis of factors that are linked to the location of study for the most recent cohort of immigrants (i.e., those who immigrated in 2000 or later).

    Release date: 2015-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311500
    Description:

    Self-employment is an important source of jobs for immigrants, more so than for non-immigrants. This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine how self-employed immigrants differ from their non-immigrant counterparts across a number of personal and job characteristics. It also compares the reasons immigrants and non-immigrants report for entering and staying in self-employment, based on data from the Survey of Self-Employment.

    Release date: 2011-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211453
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent of transmission of immigrant languages between 1981 and 2006. It compares immigrant mothers having a non-official mother tongue and their children born in Canada using a cross-sectional approach. Then a longitudinal approach is used to compare immigrant mothers in 1981 with their second-generation daughters in 2006. The article is based on census data from 1981 and 2006.

    Release date: 2011-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913257
    Description:

    Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, this study sheds light on a specific aspect of newcomers' settlement-recognition of their foreign credentials and work experience in relation to their individual characteristics. These characteristics range from class of immigrant (skilled-worker principal applicants, family class, refugees, etc.), education and field of study to country where the highest credential was earned, and knowledge of English or French. The study also examines foreign credential and work experience recognition at three time points over a four-year period-six months, two years and four years after landing.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911211055
    Description:

    The decline in earnings among immigrants over the past quarter century is well-documented, but its impact on various segments of the immigrant population is less well-known. This study examines long-term trends in the incidence of low income among working-age immigrants, immigrant seniors and the children of immigrants. The study looks at two main factors that contribute to the incidence of low income: market income and government transfers.

    Release date: 2009-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810713213
    Description:

    During their initial years in Canada, a significant minority of new immigrants send money to family members in their country of origin. The incidence of remitting among immigrants from different countries ranges from less than 10% to over 60%, and the annual amounts from about $500 to almost $3,000. While financial and family characteristics are consistently significant with the remittance activities of immigrants from all world regions, factors such as sex and education are significant only for immigrants from some regions but not others.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20040018735
    Description:

    This paper describes analyses on nonresponse among ethnic minorities in the Netherlands. These analyses show that the response effect is mediated by the degree of urbanisation. A negative impact is observed among ethnic minorities.

    Release date: 2005-10-27

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007442
    Description:

    This study examines the expansion of visible minority neighbourhoods in Canada's three largest metropolitan areas from 1981 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040027004
    Description:

    This article explores the growing evidence that even some highly skilled immigrant workers are facing employment barriers that may increase their likelihood of leaving Canada. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), landed immigrants are examined who arrived between 1990 and 1998 and intended to work as IT workers, physicians and health care managers or trades workers.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016874
    Description:

    This article (1) examines employment and unemployment rates of visible and non-visible minority groups, (2) compares Canadian-born and foreign-born visible minorities with their non-visible minority counterparts and (3) examines employment and unemployment rates separately by gender.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046803
    Description:

    This article examines the expansion of visible minority neighbourhoods in Canada's three largest census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and explores how visible minority neighbourhoods were formed.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044420
    Description:

    This article explores the labour market experiences of recent immigrants in the 25- to 44-year age group from 1986 to 1996.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

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Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114299
    Description:

    This article provides information about the number and characteristics of international students in Canada, and about their rate of transition into permanent residence. The article also examines the extent to which the transition rate varied across characteristics and cohorts, and whether these variations affected the profile of immigrants who are former international students. It does so by using a new administrative database—the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD).

    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114247
    Description:

    This article examines regional differences in the math and reading skills of immigrant children aged 15 based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). It also examines regional differences in high-school and university completion rates among young immigrants who came to Canada before the age of 15 using National Household Survey (NHS) data. Throughout the article, comparisons are made with the children of the Canadian-born (third- or higher-generation Canadians).

    Release date: 2015-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114217
    Description:

    Over the last century, millions of women, either alone or with their families, have travelled from abroad to make Canada their home. These newcomers form a diverse group, arriving from regions spanning the globe and speaking close to 200 languages between them. As newcomers to Canada, the socio-demographic profile of immigrant women in Canada differs from that of the Canadian-born population in some ways, while it is relatively similar in others. This chapter compares these two socio-demographic profiles from a gender-based perspective. It also discusses changing trends in immigration, and the influence of these trends on the demographic characteristics of the immigrant population in Canada.

    Release date: 2015-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114221
    Description:

    This article examines the differences in the location of study of immigrant adults aged 25 to 64 with a university education (i.e., with at least a bachelor’s degree). It provides results by period of immigration (pre-1990, the 1990s, and the 2000s) and provides a more in-depth analysis of factors that are linked to the location of study for the most recent cohort of immigrants (i.e., those who immigrated in 2000 or later).

    Release date: 2015-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311500
    Description:

    Self-employment is an important source of jobs for immigrants, more so than for non-immigrants. This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine how self-employed immigrants differ from their non-immigrant counterparts across a number of personal and job characteristics. It also compares the reasons immigrants and non-immigrants report for entering and staying in self-employment, based on data from the Survey of Self-Employment.

    Release date: 2011-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211453
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent of transmission of immigrant languages between 1981 and 2006. It compares immigrant mothers having a non-official mother tongue and their children born in Canada using a cross-sectional approach. Then a longitudinal approach is used to compare immigrant mothers in 1981 with their second-generation daughters in 2006. The article is based on census data from 1981 and 2006.

    Release date: 2011-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913257
    Description:

    Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, this study sheds light on a specific aspect of newcomers' settlement-recognition of their foreign credentials and work experience in relation to their individual characteristics. These characteristics range from class of immigrant (skilled-worker principal applicants, family class, refugees, etc.), education and field of study to country where the highest credential was earned, and knowledge of English or French. The study also examines foreign credential and work experience recognition at three time points over a four-year period-six months, two years and four years after landing.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911211055
    Description:

    The decline in earnings among immigrants over the past quarter century is well-documented, but its impact on various segments of the immigrant population is less well-known. This study examines long-term trends in the incidence of low income among working-age immigrants, immigrant seniors and the children of immigrants. The study looks at two main factors that contribute to the incidence of low income: market income and government transfers.

    Release date: 2009-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810713213
    Description:

    During their initial years in Canada, a significant minority of new immigrants send money to family members in their country of origin. The incidence of remitting among immigrants from different countries ranges from less than 10% to over 60%, and the annual amounts from about $500 to almost $3,000. While financial and family characteristics are consistently significant with the remittance activities of immigrants from all world regions, factors such as sex and education are significant only for immigrants from some regions but not others.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040027004
    Description:

    This article explores the growing evidence that even some highly skilled immigrant workers are facing employment barriers that may increase their likelihood of leaving Canada. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), landed immigrants are examined who arrived between 1990 and 1998 and intended to work as IT workers, physicians and health care managers or trades workers.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016874
    Description:

    This article (1) examines employment and unemployment rates of visible and non-visible minority groups, (2) compares Canadian-born and foreign-born visible minorities with their non-visible minority counterparts and (3) examines employment and unemployment rates separately by gender.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046803
    Description:

    This article examines the expansion of visible minority neighbourhoods in Canada's three largest census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and explores how visible minority neighbourhoods were formed.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044420
    Description:

    This article explores the labour market experiences of recent immigrants in the 25- to 44-year age group from 1986 to 1996.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

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Reference (2) (2 results)

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