Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (27)

All (27) (25 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700714843
    Description:

    The analysis used two population-based linked databases (the Immigrant Landing File and the Discharge Abstract Database) to estimate age-standardized hospitalization rates overall and for leading causes among economic class principal applicant subcategories, by sex, compared with their Canadian-born counterparts.

    Release date: 2017-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601214688
    Description:

    This study uses information from the Immigrant Landing File and the 2006 Census of Population linked to the Discharge Abstract Database to compare age-standardized hospitalization rates of refugees with those of other immigrants and the Canadian-born population.

    Release date: 2016-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600814648
    Description:

    This study reports the initial results of the recent Immigrant Landing File-to-Discharge Abstract Database linkage – specifically, a bivariate overview of acute care hospitalization rates by immigration category, landing year, and source world region at the national level.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201600114615
    Description:

    This chapter of the Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada shows recent trends related to international immigration in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114639
    Description:

    This study examines the extent to which young adults aged 20 to 29 live with their parents across various ethnocultural and socioeconomic characteristics. The results are based on data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) as well as data from previous censuses.

    Release date: 2016-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114345
    Description:

    This article analyzes the impact of immigration on the size and ethnocultural composition of future cohorts of seniors in Canada, using data from the Population Estimates Program, the Population Projections Program and other sources of demographic data.

    Release date: 2016-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114154
    Description:

    Even though most grandparents live in separate households from their adult children and grandchildren, sometimes the grandparent and grandchild generations live together. This paper provides information on the number of grandparents who are in this particular situation, along with their living arrangements and their ethnocultural and sociodemographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114152
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada introduces selected socio-demographic and ethnocultural characteristics of the female population in Canada. Accounting for approximately half of the population, women and girls are characterized by different historical social and demographic trajectories that distinguish them from men and boys in this country. In order to effectively plan and develop programs and policy directed toward women and girls, it is necessary to understand trends pertaining to population growth and age structure, as well as the consequences of these patterns on population aging and the composition of the population, and how these might vary by sex. Among the topics to be examined in this chapter are the shares of women and girls in the total population, trends by age, including historical comparisons and some regional differences across the provinces and territories. Selected aspects of diversity within the female population will also be presented, including Aboriginal identity, immigrant status and visible minority status, as well as trends related to residential mobility, marital status, language and religion.

    Release date: 2015-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401014099
    Description:

    This study uses the linked 2006 Census-Hospital Discharge Abstract Database to examine hospitalization during the 2004-to-2006 period, by immigrant status of Ontario seniors.

    Release date: 2014-10-15

  • Table: 99-010-X201100314034
    Description:

    These three short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Generation status: Canadian-born children of immigrants, the second, Obtaining Canadian citizenship and the third, Mixed unions in Canada.

    Release date: 2014-06-17

  • Table: 99-010-X201100311790
    Description:

    These three short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Generation status: Canadian-born children of immigrants, the second, Obtaining Canadian citizenship and the third, Mixed unions in Canada.

    Release date: 2013-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201100111526
    Description:

    This article on international migration will provide an overview of the current demographic situation regarding immigration to Canada analyzed within a historical and international context, where possible. In addition, the category of admission of immigrants to Canada, primarily during the 2008 and 2009 period, with reference to preliminary 2010 data, as well as place of birth, provincial or territorial destination within Canada of immigrants, and a brief section on international adoption will be discussed.

    Release date: 2011-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811210766
    Description:

    During the 1991 to 2006 period, the proportion of immigrants with a university degree in jobs with low educational requirements increased, not only among recent immigrants but also among established ones. The increases for established immigrants suggest that the difficulties, which have long plagued recent immigrants, are not necessarily temporary. Changes in the profile of established immigrants - particularly language and country of origin - accounted for only a quarter of the deterioration for established immigrants.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800510798
    Description:

    In a recent Statistics Canada study, Aneta Bonikowska, David Green and Craig Riddell (2008) use data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to measure the literacy skills of immigrants and the Canadian-born and relate these to earnings outcomes. The analysis takes into account standard demographic information, along with information on where education was obtained and age of migration to further refine their analysis of immigrant/Canadian-born earnings differentials. This article summarizes the results of their research.

    Release date: 2009-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050059112
    Description:

    This article draws on the results of the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to examine the skill profiles of Canadians in four domains: prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving. Skill levels are compared for three groups: the Canadian-born, recent immigrants (those who have been in Canada for 10 years or less) and established immigrants (those who have been in Canada for more than 10 years). Other dimensions considered are age, education and mother tongue.

    Release date: 2006-02-28

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20040018749
    Description:

    In its attempt to measure the mental health of Cambodian refugees in the U.S., Rand Corporation introduces novel methodology for efficiently listing, screening, and identifying households to ultimately yield a random sample of eligible participants.

    Release date: 2005-10-27

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20040018740
    Description:

    The illegal immigration is difficult to sample in Italy since exhaustive sampling frames are generally unavailable. Sampling of centers is a strategy recently developed for surveying immigrant population.

    Release date: 2005-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040047422
    Description:

    This article examines recent evidence on the academic performance of children of people who immigrated to Canada during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410613121
    Description:

    This paper examines the problems new immigrants have when looking for a job in Canada, including non-recognition of their credentials, their education level, and their experience abroad.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040048403
    Description:

    This Juristat presents the results of the Hate Crime Pilot Survey undertaken by the CCJS in collaboration with 12 major police forces across the country. This paper also draws on other available data sources in order to provide contextual information on hate crime and quantify its occurrence.

    Release date: 2004-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046802
    Description:

    This analysis examines the historical and current residential settlement patterns of Blacks, and the places of birth of Black immigrants, especially those who arrived during the 1990s. In addition, the labour market experience of Blacks, and some family characteristics, are explored.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021058443
    Description:

    Using the Labour Market Activity Survey and the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this article examines the extent to which registered pension plan coverage of immigrants and members of visible minorities differed from that of other Canadians between 1988 and 1998.

    Release date: 2002-05-16

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Table: 99-010-X201100314034
    Description:

    These three short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Generation status: Canadian-born children of immigrants, the second, Obtaining Canadian citizenship and the third, Mixed unions in Canada.

    Release date: 2014-06-17

  • Table: 99-010-X201100311790
    Description:

    These three short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Generation status: Canadian-born children of immigrants, the second, Obtaining Canadian citizenship and the third, Mixed unions in Canada.

    Release date: 2013-05-08

Analysis (22)

Analysis (22) (22 of 22 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700714843
    Description:

    The analysis used two population-based linked databases (the Immigrant Landing File and the Discharge Abstract Database) to estimate age-standardized hospitalization rates overall and for leading causes among economic class principal applicant subcategories, by sex, compared with their Canadian-born counterparts.

    Release date: 2017-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601214688
    Description:

    This study uses information from the Immigrant Landing File and the 2006 Census of Population linked to the Discharge Abstract Database to compare age-standardized hospitalization rates of refugees with those of other immigrants and the Canadian-born population.

    Release date: 2016-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600814648
    Description:

    This study reports the initial results of the recent Immigrant Landing File-to-Discharge Abstract Database linkage – specifically, a bivariate overview of acute care hospitalization rates by immigration category, landing year, and source world region at the national level.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201600114615
    Description:

    This chapter of the Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada shows recent trends related to international immigration in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114639
    Description:

    This study examines the extent to which young adults aged 20 to 29 live with their parents across various ethnocultural and socioeconomic characteristics. The results are based on data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) as well as data from previous censuses.

    Release date: 2016-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114345
    Description:

    This article analyzes the impact of immigration on the size and ethnocultural composition of future cohorts of seniors in Canada, using data from the Population Estimates Program, the Population Projections Program and other sources of demographic data.

    Release date: 2016-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114154
    Description:

    Even though most grandparents live in separate households from their adult children and grandchildren, sometimes the grandparent and grandchild generations live together. This paper provides information on the number of grandparents who are in this particular situation, along with their living arrangements and their ethnocultural and sociodemographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114152
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada introduces selected socio-demographic and ethnocultural characteristics of the female population in Canada. Accounting for approximately half of the population, women and girls are characterized by different historical social and demographic trajectories that distinguish them from men and boys in this country. In order to effectively plan and develop programs and policy directed toward women and girls, it is necessary to understand trends pertaining to population growth and age structure, as well as the consequences of these patterns on population aging and the composition of the population, and how these might vary by sex. Among the topics to be examined in this chapter are the shares of women and girls in the total population, trends by age, including historical comparisons and some regional differences across the provinces and territories. Selected aspects of diversity within the female population will also be presented, including Aboriginal identity, immigrant status and visible minority status, as well as trends related to residential mobility, marital status, language and religion.

    Release date: 2015-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401014099
    Description:

    This study uses the linked 2006 Census-Hospital Discharge Abstract Database to examine hospitalization during the 2004-to-2006 period, by immigrant status of Ontario seniors.

    Release date: 2014-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201100111526
    Description:

    This article on international migration will provide an overview of the current demographic situation regarding immigration to Canada analyzed within a historical and international context, where possible. In addition, the category of admission of immigrants to Canada, primarily during the 2008 and 2009 period, with reference to preliminary 2010 data, as well as place of birth, provincial or territorial destination within Canada of immigrants, and a brief section on international adoption will be discussed.

    Release date: 2011-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811210766
    Description:

    During the 1991 to 2006 period, the proportion of immigrants with a university degree in jobs with low educational requirements increased, not only among recent immigrants but also among established ones. The increases for established immigrants suggest that the difficulties, which have long plagued recent immigrants, are not necessarily temporary. Changes in the profile of established immigrants - particularly language and country of origin - accounted for only a quarter of the deterioration for established immigrants.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800510798
    Description:

    In a recent Statistics Canada study, Aneta Bonikowska, David Green and Craig Riddell (2008) use data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to measure the literacy skills of immigrants and the Canadian-born and relate these to earnings outcomes. The analysis takes into account standard demographic information, along with information on where education was obtained and age of migration to further refine their analysis of immigrant/Canadian-born earnings differentials. This article summarizes the results of their research.

    Release date: 2009-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050059112
    Description:

    This article draws on the results of the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to examine the skill profiles of Canadians in four domains: prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving. Skill levels are compared for three groups: the Canadian-born, recent immigrants (those who have been in Canada for 10 years or less) and established immigrants (those who have been in Canada for more than 10 years). Other dimensions considered are age, education and mother tongue.

    Release date: 2006-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040047422
    Description:

    This article examines recent evidence on the academic performance of children of people who immigrated to Canada during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410613121
    Description:

    This paper examines the problems new immigrants have when looking for a job in Canada, including non-recognition of their credentials, their education level, and their experience abroad.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040048403
    Description:

    This Juristat presents the results of the Hate Crime Pilot Survey undertaken by the CCJS in collaboration with 12 major police forces across the country. This paper also draws on other available data sources in order to provide contextual information on hate crime and quantify its occurrence.

    Release date: 2004-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046802
    Description:

    This analysis examines the historical and current residential settlement patterns of Blacks, and the places of birth of Black immigrants, especially those who arrived during the 1990s. In addition, the labour market experience of Blacks, and some family characteristics, are explored.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021058443
    Description:

    Using the Labour Market Activity Survey and the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this article examines the extent to which registered pension plan coverage of immigrants and members of visible minorities differed from that of other Canadians between 1988 and 1998.

    Release date: 2002-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042287
    Description:

    Immigrant workers are over-represented in "product fabricating" occupations, which include, for example, garment workers and mechanics. This profile of immigrants in fabricating jobs looks at age, education, period of immigration and knowledge of English or French. It also compared the employment income of immigrant and non-immigrant workers in product fabricating occupations.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

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