Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (18)

All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401014099
    Description:

    This study uses the linked 2006 Census-Hospital Discharge Abstract Database to examine hospitalization during the 2004-to-2006 period, by immigrant status of Ontario seniors.

    Release date: 2014-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111669
    Description:

    This article examines donating and volunteering among immigrants in Canada: their reasons for doing so or not, the amounts of money and time they give and the types of organizations that they support. It compares immigrants to other Canadians and considers how the philanthropic behaviour of immigrants changes as they establish themselves in Canada. The data are from the 2010 Survey of Giving Volunteering and Participating.

    Release date: 2012-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211592
    Description:

    Recent immigrants are having more difficulty adjusting to the Canadian economy than did their predecessors. It is taking newcomers longer to achieve employment and income levels similar to those of the Canadian-born. Using the General Social Survey conducted in 2008, this article examines whether personal networks, along with more typically-used measures of human capital, might explain differences in employment and income levels between immigrants and other Canadians. Are more limited personal networks associated with lower employment rates and incomes among Canada's more recent immigrants?

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211536
    Description:

    Young adults with one or two parents who are university-educated are much more likely to have a degree themselves than those whose parents are less well-educated. This article determines whether intergenerational mobility in university education is increasing. Specifically, whether people whose parents did not complete university are themselves more likely to have finished university than nearly 25 years ago is examined, as is whether the gap between them and people whose parents completed university has narrowed over time.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211166
    Description:

    This study examines the growing number of non-permanent residents who work temporarily in Canada. They are compared with permanent residents in terms of demographic characteristics, location, occupations and earnings. Census data show that while the numbers destined to skilled work has been increasing, most non-permanent residents are found in relatively unskilled occupations. Reflecting the occupations in which they work, foreign nationals working temporarily in Canada tend to be paid less than are comparable Canadian born and established immigrant workers

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110770
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 2006 Census of Canada to look at the use of non-official languages at work among immigrants. Owing to the growing contribution that immigrants are making to Canada's labour force, languages other than English and French are being used more often in Canadian work places. The article examines which languages are used most often. It also looks at the impact of age, gender, year of immigration, education, official language ability and the presence of others who speak the mother tongue in the community where they work, on the likelihood that immigrants will use a non-official language on the job.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110771
    Description:

    This article explores the implications of working in a language other than English or French for immigrants in Canada. It looks at the occupations and industries in which immigrants who use non-official languages on the job are found. Holding other factors constant, it also looks at the impact on employment earnings and the financial returns to education for immigrants who work in languages other than English or French.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049127
    Description:

    Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS), this article examines the preservation of ancestral languages by looking at the extent to which allophone immigrants (i.e. those whose mother tongue is neither English nor French) have transmitted their mother tongue to their Canadian-born children. The analysis focuses on the factors associated with the probability of the ancestral language being the respondent's mother tongue, the respondent's ability to speak the ancestral language, and his or her regular use of this language in the home.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038966
    Description:

    Studies of the postsecondary attainment of young adults are informative, but it is also useful to examine the educational aspirations of teenagers. Such studies profile the value placed on different types of formal education by youth as well as perceived opportunities for upward occupational mobility. This article explores the educational aspirations of 15-year-old visible minority immigrant students and compares them with those of Canadian-born youth who are not part of a visible minority group. It then identifies the most important factors that explain the large ethnocultural differences in university aspirations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048041
    Description:

    This article describes the prevalence of self-reported overweight and obesity in different ethnic groups and examines the influence of time since immigration on the prevalence of overweight within and between ethnic groups. The results are based on data from the 2000/01 and 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047774
    Description:

    The people of Canada have a long tradition of identifying themselves according to the land or nation of their sometimes remote ancestors. Over the past few decades, however, a rapidly growing number have begun describing themselves in the census as Canadians. The proportion of the population claiming some element of Canadian ethno-cultural ancestry climbed from fewer than 1% in 1986 to nearly 40% in 2001, making it by far the most common ethno-cultural ancestry reported on the census.

    Using data from the censuses of population, this article explores the potential reasons behind these changes. It begins by discussing our understanding of ethnicity and how it has changed over time. The article then reviews some of the meanings attached specifically to Canadian ethnicity and follows by examining the characteristics of individuals who, according to the 2001 Census, reported having a Canadian ethnic background.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047778
    Description:

    Chinese in Canada now comprise the country's largest visible minority group, surpassing one million for the first time, following successive waves of immigration. They are a diverse group, reporting a variety of countries of birth, mother tongues, home languages and religious affiliation. But they are linked by a common ethnicity. And while earlier Chinese immigrants came as manual labourers, recent arrivals tend to come with education and human capital. This article examines the history of the Chinese in Canada, its diverse population and its contribution to the nation's rich multicultural mosaic.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047775
    Description:

    Canada has a large and varied immigrant population, a diverse culture and vast distances. But whether individuals are Canadian citizens by birth or by naturalization, they are granted the same rights and responsibilities. Canadian citizenship may thus be viewed as something that creates a shared sense of belonging or an indication of allegiance to Canada. For the foreign-born, acquiring citizenship may be symbolic of the final stage of the migration process, their inclusion into the electoral process and a declaration of their commitment to Canada, their adopted homeland.

    This study explores the characteristics associated with becoming a Canadian citizen among immigrants who have resided in Canada for various periods of time.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016874
    Description:

    This article (1) examines employment and unemployment rates of visible and non-visible minority groups, (2) compares Canadian-born and foreign-born visible minorities with their non-visible minority counterparts and (3) examines employment and unemployment rates separately by gender.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040048403
    Description:

    This Juristat presents the results of the Hate Crime Pilot Survey undertaken by the CCJS in collaboration with 12 major police forces across the country. This paper also draws on other available data sources in order to provide contextual information on hate crime and quantify its occurrence.

    Release date: 2004-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046802
    Description:

    This analysis examines the historical and current residential settlement patterns of Blacks, and the places of birth of Black immigrants, especially those who arrived during the 1990s. In addition, the labour market experience of Blacks, and some family characteristics, are explored.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010015704
    Description:

    This article examines the migratory behaviour of individuals in the context of a family strategy.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

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Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401014099
    Description:

    This study uses the linked 2006 Census-Hospital Discharge Abstract Database to examine hospitalization during the 2004-to-2006 period, by immigrant status of Ontario seniors.

    Release date: 2014-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111669
    Description:

    This article examines donating and volunteering among immigrants in Canada: their reasons for doing so or not, the amounts of money and time they give and the types of organizations that they support. It compares immigrants to other Canadians and considers how the philanthropic behaviour of immigrants changes as they establish themselves in Canada. The data are from the 2010 Survey of Giving Volunteering and Participating.

    Release date: 2012-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211592
    Description:

    Recent immigrants are having more difficulty adjusting to the Canadian economy than did their predecessors. It is taking newcomers longer to achieve employment and income levels similar to those of the Canadian-born. Using the General Social Survey conducted in 2008, this article examines whether personal networks, along with more typically-used measures of human capital, might explain differences in employment and income levels between immigrants and other Canadians. Are more limited personal networks associated with lower employment rates and incomes among Canada's more recent immigrants?

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211536
    Description:

    Young adults with one or two parents who are university-educated are much more likely to have a degree themselves than those whose parents are less well-educated. This article determines whether intergenerational mobility in university education is increasing. Specifically, whether people whose parents did not complete university are themselves more likely to have finished university than nearly 25 years ago is examined, as is whether the gap between them and people whose parents completed university has narrowed over time.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211166
    Description:

    This study examines the growing number of non-permanent residents who work temporarily in Canada. They are compared with permanent residents in terms of demographic characteristics, location, occupations and earnings. Census data show that while the numbers destined to skilled work has been increasing, most non-permanent residents are found in relatively unskilled occupations. Reflecting the occupations in which they work, foreign nationals working temporarily in Canada tend to be paid less than are comparable Canadian born and established immigrant workers

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110770
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 2006 Census of Canada to look at the use of non-official languages at work among immigrants. Owing to the growing contribution that immigrants are making to Canada's labour force, languages other than English and French are being used more often in Canadian work places. The article examines which languages are used most often. It also looks at the impact of age, gender, year of immigration, education, official language ability and the presence of others who speak the mother tongue in the community where they work, on the likelihood that immigrants will use a non-official language on the job.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110771
    Description:

    This article explores the implications of working in a language other than English or French for immigrants in Canada. It looks at the occupations and industries in which immigrants who use non-official languages on the job are found. Holding other factors constant, it also looks at the impact on employment earnings and the financial returns to education for immigrants who work in languages other than English or French.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049127
    Description:

    Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS), this article examines the preservation of ancestral languages by looking at the extent to which allophone immigrants (i.e. those whose mother tongue is neither English nor French) have transmitted their mother tongue to their Canadian-born children. The analysis focuses on the factors associated with the probability of the ancestral language being the respondent's mother tongue, the respondent's ability to speak the ancestral language, and his or her regular use of this language in the home.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038966
    Description:

    Studies of the postsecondary attainment of young adults are informative, but it is also useful to examine the educational aspirations of teenagers. Such studies profile the value placed on different types of formal education by youth as well as perceived opportunities for upward occupational mobility. This article explores the educational aspirations of 15-year-old visible minority immigrant students and compares them with those of Canadian-born youth who are not part of a visible minority group. It then identifies the most important factors that explain the large ethnocultural differences in university aspirations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048041
    Description:

    This article describes the prevalence of self-reported overweight and obesity in different ethnic groups and examines the influence of time since immigration on the prevalence of overweight within and between ethnic groups. The results are based on data from the 2000/01 and 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047774
    Description:

    The people of Canada have a long tradition of identifying themselves according to the land or nation of their sometimes remote ancestors. Over the past few decades, however, a rapidly growing number have begun describing themselves in the census as Canadians. The proportion of the population claiming some element of Canadian ethno-cultural ancestry climbed from fewer than 1% in 1986 to nearly 40% in 2001, making it by far the most common ethno-cultural ancestry reported on the census.

    Using data from the censuses of population, this article explores the potential reasons behind these changes. It begins by discussing our understanding of ethnicity and how it has changed over time. The article then reviews some of the meanings attached specifically to Canadian ethnicity and follows by examining the characteristics of individuals who, according to the 2001 Census, reported having a Canadian ethnic background.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047778
    Description:

    Chinese in Canada now comprise the country's largest visible minority group, surpassing one million for the first time, following successive waves of immigration. They are a diverse group, reporting a variety of countries of birth, mother tongues, home languages and religious affiliation. But they are linked by a common ethnicity. And while earlier Chinese immigrants came as manual labourers, recent arrivals tend to come with education and human capital. This article examines the history of the Chinese in Canada, its diverse population and its contribution to the nation's rich multicultural mosaic.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047775
    Description:

    Canada has a large and varied immigrant population, a diverse culture and vast distances. But whether individuals are Canadian citizens by birth or by naturalization, they are granted the same rights and responsibilities. Canadian citizenship may thus be viewed as something that creates a shared sense of belonging or an indication of allegiance to Canada. For the foreign-born, acquiring citizenship may be symbolic of the final stage of the migration process, their inclusion into the electoral process and a declaration of their commitment to Canada, their adopted homeland.

    This study explores the characteristics associated with becoming a Canadian citizen among immigrants who have resided in Canada for various periods of time.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016874
    Description:

    This article (1) examines employment and unemployment rates of visible and non-visible minority groups, (2) compares Canadian-born and foreign-born visible minorities with their non-visible minority counterparts and (3) examines employment and unemployment rates separately by gender.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040048403
    Description:

    This Juristat presents the results of the Hate Crime Pilot Survey undertaken by the CCJS in collaboration with 12 major police forces across the country. This paper also draws on other available data sources in order to provide contextual information on hate crime and quantify its occurrence.

    Release date: 2004-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046802
    Description:

    This analysis examines the historical and current residential settlement patterns of Blacks, and the places of birth of Black immigrants, especially those who arrived during the 1990s. In addition, the labour market experience of Blacks, and some family characteristics, are explored.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010015704
    Description:

    This article examines the migratory behaviour of individuals in the context of a family strategy.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

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