Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (17)

All (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2017-09-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-209-X
    Description:

    The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada analyses recent demographic patterns at the national, provincial and subprovincial levels. Trends in population growth and the evolution of the various components of Canada's population growth - fertility, mortality and migration (interprovincial and international) - as well as marital status, are examined. The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada has been published annually or biennially since 1985. Beginning in 2011, the Report is available as a dynamic, internet-only publication in order to provide the most recent data and analyses on Canadian demographics as soon as they are available.

    Release date: 2017-07-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-551-X
    Description:

    These analytical products present projections of the diversity of the Canadian population. The purpose of these projections is to paint a potential portrait of the composition of Canada’s population according to different ethnocultural and language characteristics, if certain population growth scenarios were to become reality in the future. Produced using Demosim, a microsimulation model, these projections cover characteristics such as place of birth, generation status, visible minority group, religion and mother tongue.

    Release date: 2017-01-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-003-X
    Description:

    Canadian Demographics at a glance is designed to gather a maximum of demographic information in a single document, giving users an easily and quickly accessible up-to-date picture of the Canadian population. It presents data on demographic growth, fertility, mortality, migratory movements, aging and ethno-cultural diversity of the population in the form of tables and graphs accompanied by a brief analytical commentary.

    Release date: 2016-02-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-606-X
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    Release date: 2012-12-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-641-X
    Description:

    This report concerns French-language immigration outside Quebec and its recent evolution, focusing on its numbers, its geographic distribution and its demographic and social characteristics. This statistical portrait will mainly use the concept of first official language spoken (FOLS), which is now widely used as a criterion for a person's linguistic identity in studies on official language minorities. The Francophone immigrant population outside Quebec is comprised of two groups: those who have only French as their first official language spoken (French FOLS immigrants) and those who have both French and English (French-English FOLS immigrants).

    The Francophone immigrant population living outside Quebec is fairly small, both in absolute numbers and in relation to either the French-speaking population or the immigrant population as a whole. However, the relative weight of Francophone immigrants within the French-speaking population has increased, going from 6.2% to 10% between 1991 and 2006, while their weight within the overall immigrant population has varied more moderately, and in 2006 it was, at most, less than 2%.

    The majority of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec 70% are concentrated in Ontario. Furthermore, two-thirds of French-speaking immigrants live in three metropolitan areas: Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In Canada outside Quebec, French-English FOLS immigrants, numbering 76,100 in the 2006 Census, are slightly more numerous than French FOLS immigrants, who number 60,900. In some cities, especially Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary, this characteristic is more prevalent, with French-English FOLS immigrants outnumbering their French FOLS counterparts by almost two to one. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these two FOLS groups are sometimes quite different.

    International immigration to Canada has undergone a rapid transformation in recent decades. Immigrants of European origin have tended to give way to immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this regard, French FOLS immigrants stand out from other immigrants in that a large proportion of them come from Africa. One of the consequences of this trend has been to change the composition of the French FOLS immigrant population; in 2006, Blacks made up 26% of that population, compared to 5% of the other two immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-229-X
    Description:

    This report examines the health of Canadians by focusing on demography, health status, health behaviours, and the environment. The aging of the population provides a context for the report. Measures that reflect physical, mental and social well-being are presented, followed by indicators of positive and negative behaviours that are known to influence health status. Finally, indicators of the social and physical environments in which we live and work are examined. Together, these Health Indicators highlight the health of Canadians at a national and provincial/territorial level. They provide benchmarks for comparisons over time and place, from regional to international levels.

    This report celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Health Indicators project. Since 1999, Statistics Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information have collaborated on developing and providing a broad range of indicators for health regions across Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-639-X
    Description:

    Beginning in late 2006, the Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division of Statistics Canada embarked on the process of review of questions used in the Census and in surveys to produce data about Aboriginal peoples (North American Indian, Métis and Inuit). This process is essential to ensure that Aboriginal identification questions are valid measures of contemporary Aboriginal identification, in all its complexity. Questions reviewed included the following (from the Census 2B questionnaire):- the Ethnic origin / Aboriginal ancestry question;- the Aboriginal identity question;- the Treaty / Registered Indian question; and- the Indian band / First Nation Membership question.

    Additional testing was conducted on Census questions with potential Aboriginal response options: the population group question (also known as visible minorities), and the Religion question. The review process to date has involved two major steps: regional discussions with data users and stakeholders, and qualitative testing. The regional discussions with over 350 users of Aboriginal data across Canada were held in early 2007 to examine the four questions used on the Census and other surveys of Statistics Canada. Data users included National Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Provincial and Territorial Organizations, Federal, Provincial and local governments, researchers and Aboriginal service organizations. User feedback showed that main areas of concern were data quality, undercoverage, the wording of questions, and the importance of comparability over time.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-630-X
    Description:

    Matter of Fact is an analytic series highlighting what the General Social Survey (GSS) has contributed to understanding Canadian society over the last 20 years.

    The 20 years of GSS data is an opportunity to look back over our years of data and ask: What have we learned about Canadian society over those 20 years?

    This series will include short, focused, single-theme analysis documents. Over the course of the series analysis will include topics on: How satisfied are Canadians with their life in general? What is the relationship between education, work and retirement? What motivates people to retire or to continue working? How do people prepare for retirement? How is the Internet changing the way Canadians live? How are Canadians using their time? What do Canadian families look like? How have they changed in recent years? How are Canadians engaged with their families, neighbours, communities and coworkers? Which Canadians are caring for others? What is the impact of care-giving on people's work, families, leisure time and health? What are the victimization rates for Canadians, and who is most at risk of victimization? How have housing trends changed over the past 20 years? And how have religious practices changed over the past 20 years?

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-624-X
    Description:

    Immigrants to Canada must face numerous difficulties during their first years in the country, the two most important being to find an appropriate job and language barrier. But does a better knowledge of official languages increase the chances for an immigrant of occupying a high-skilled job, a job in the intended occupation, a job similar to the one they had before immigrating, a job related to their training or field of study, or to have a higher hourly rate?

    In an attempt to answer this question, the data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) were used. In the LSIC, a cohort of immigrants was interviewed at three points in time being 6 months, 2 years and 4 years after arrival in the country. For this study, we used the information about the job occupied at the time of each interview, as well as the English and French self-assessed spoken ability levels at each of these moments.

    Release date: 2007-04-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-581-X
    Description:

    This report briefly describes over 100 long-term medical follow-up studies covering topics over the complete life cycle including most age groups and diseases. The research projects examine delayed health outcomes in relation to occupational, environmental, lifestyle, medical and socio-economic factors.

    This inventory of projects carried out since 1978, searchable by themes, will aid in determining earlier research completed using record linkage plus national birth, cancer and death databases for Canada. It outlines the agencies involved, the main investigators at the time of the work, the size of the study population, and provides citations to published findings. This report will be useful for those who make or influence policies, regulations and medical guidelines, and carry out research that affects the health of the population at the industry, community, regional, national or international level.

    Release date: 2006-02-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-615-X
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), conducted jointly by Statistics Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada under the Policy Research Initiative, is a comprehensive survey designed to study the process by which new immigrants adapt to Canadian society. About 12,000 immigrants aged 15 and older who arrived in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001 were interviewed. By late 2005, when all three waves of interviews will have been completed, the survey will provide a better understanding of how the settlement process unfolds for new immigrants.

    The results of this survey will provide valuable information on how immigrants are meeting various challenges associated with integration and what resources are most helpful to their settlement in Canada. The main topics being investigated include housing, education, foreign credentials recognition, employment, income, the development and use of social networks, language skills, health, values and attitudes, and satisfaction with the settlement experience.

    Results from the first wave of the LSIC had shown that labour market integration was a particularly critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. This paper therefore focuses on this issue. The release addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2005-10-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-541-X
    Description:

    This report presents the main results of population projections according to some ethnocultural variables (visible minority group, immigrant status, religion, mother tongue) for Canada, provinces and selected metropolitan areas. Based on the January 1st 2001 estimation of the permanent resident population, results of five projection scenarios from a micro-simulation model that take into account differentials in behaviors and intergenerational transfers are presented for the years 2001 to 2017.

    Release date: 2005-03-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 96-326-X
    Description:

    This work is an updated version of a study published under the same title following the population censuses of 1991 and 1996. The text and tables have been adapted to reflect the more complete data from the 2001 Census, in which the usual questions on knowledge of languages, mother tongue, and language spoken 'most often' at home are supplemented by a question on languages spoken 'regularly' at home , and a two-part question on language use at work, that is, the language used 'most often,' and other languages used 'regularly,' in the workplace. This enrichment of the content has allowed us to expand our analysis while remaining true to the initial goal of presenting in a straightfoward manner basic statistics on the country's demolinguistic reality.

    Release date: 2004-12-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-593-X
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) was developed by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Department of Canadian Heritage in order to provide new and important information on the ethnic and cultural background of people in Canada and how it relates to their lives in Canada today.

    The survey followed the 2001 Census with the census providing the frame for the sample. The target population for the survey was persons aged 15 years or older living in private households in the 10 provinces. The population did not include persons living in collective dwellings, persons living on Indian reserves, persons of Aboriginal origins living off-reserve, or persons living in Northern and remote areas. There was a separate post-censal survey designed for Aboriginal peoples, the Aboriginal Peoples Survey, which was conducted in 2001 and 2002.

    Using the EDS data, this article examines Canada's ethno-cultural mosaic in 2002, providing a portrait of the different generations of Canadians who today make up this country. It also analyses the level of attachment that people in the different generations and ethnic groups have to their own ethno-cultural backgrounds and to the broader Canadian society.

    Release date: 2003-09-29

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Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2017-09-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-209-X
    Description:

    The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada analyses recent demographic patterns at the national, provincial and subprovincial levels. Trends in population growth and the evolution of the various components of Canada's population growth - fertility, mortality and migration (interprovincial and international) - as well as marital status, are examined. The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada has been published annually or biennially since 1985. Beginning in 2011, the Report is available as a dynamic, internet-only publication in order to provide the most recent data and analyses on Canadian demographics as soon as they are available.

    Release date: 2017-07-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-551-X
    Description:

    These analytical products present projections of the diversity of the Canadian population. The purpose of these projections is to paint a potential portrait of the composition of Canada’s population according to different ethnocultural and language characteristics, if certain population growth scenarios were to become reality in the future. Produced using Demosim, a microsimulation model, these projections cover characteristics such as place of birth, generation status, visible minority group, religion and mother tongue.

    Release date: 2017-01-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-003-X
    Description:

    Canadian Demographics at a glance is designed to gather a maximum of demographic information in a single document, giving users an easily and quickly accessible up-to-date picture of the Canadian population. It presents data on demographic growth, fertility, mortality, migratory movements, aging and ethno-cultural diversity of the population in the form of tables and graphs accompanied by a brief analytical commentary.

    Release date: 2016-02-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-606-X
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    Release date: 2012-12-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-641-X
    Description:

    This report concerns French-language immigration outside Quebec and its recent evolution, focusing on its numbers, its geographic distribution and its demographic and social characteristics. This statistical portrait will mainly use the concept of first official language spoken (FOLS), which is now widely used as a criterion for a person's linguistic identity in studies on official language minorities. The Francophone immigrant population outside Quebec is comprised of two groups: those who have only French as their first official language spoken (French FOLS immigrants) and those who have both French and English (French-English FOLS immigrants).

    The Francophone immigrant population living outside Quebec is fairly small, both in absolute numbers and in relation to either the French-speaking population or the immigrant population as a whole. However, the relative weight of Francophone immigrants within the French-speaking population has increased, going from 6.2% to 10% between 1991 and 2006, while their weight within the overall immigrant population has varied more moderately, and in 2006 it was, at most, less than 2%.

    The majority of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec 70% are concentrated in Ontario. Furthermore, two-thirds of French-speaking immigrants live in three metropolitan areas: Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In Canada outside Quebec, French-English FOLS immigrants, numbering 76,100 in the 2006 Census, are slightly more numerous than French FOLS immigrants, who number 60,900. In some cities, especially Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary, this characteristic is more prevalent, with French-English FOLS immigrants outnumbering their French FOLS counterparts by almost two to one. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these two FOLS groups are sometimes quite different.

    International immigration to Canada has undergone a rapid transformation in recent decades. Immigrants of European origin have tended to give way to immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this regard, French FOLS immigrants stand out from other immigrants in that a large proportion of them come from Africa. One of the consequences of this trend has been to change the composition of the French FOLS immigrant population; in 2006, Blacks made up 26% of that population, compared to 5% of the other two immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-229-X
    Description:

    This report examines the health of Canadians by focusing on demography, health status, health behaviours, and the environment. The aging of the population provides a context for the report. Measures that reflect physical, mental and social well-being are presented, followed by indicators of positive and negative behaviours that are known to influence health status. Finally, indicators of the social and physical environments in which we live and work are examined. Together, these Health Indicators highlight the health of Canadians at a national and provincial/territorial level. They provide benchmarks for comparisons over time and place, from regional to international levels.

    This report celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Health Indicators project. Since 1999, Statistics Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information have collaborated on developing and providing a broad range of indicators for health regions across Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-639-X
    Description:

    Beginning in late 2006, the Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division of Statistics Canada embarked on the process of review of questions used in the Census and in surveys to produce data about Aboriginal peoples (North American Indian, Métis and Inuit). This process is essential to ensure that Aboriginal identification questions are valid measures of contemporary Aboriginal identification, in all its complexity. Questions reviewed included the following (from the Census 2B questionnaire):- the Ethnic origin / Aboriginal ancestry question;- the Aboriginal identity question;- the Treaty / Registered Indian question; and- the Indian band / First Nation Membership question.

    Additional testing was conducted on Census questions with potential Aboriginal response options: the population group question (also known as visible minorities), and the Religion question. The review process to date has involved two major steps: regional discussions with data users and stakeholders, and qualitative testing. The regional discussions with over 350 users of Aboriginal data across Canada were held in early 2007 to examine the four questions used on the Census and other surveys of Statistics Canada. Data users included National Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Provincial and Territorial Organizations, Federal, Provincial and local governments, researchers and Aboriginal service organizations. User feedback showed that main areas of concern were data quality, undercoverage, the wording of questions, and the importance of comparability over time.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-630-X
    Description:

    Matter of Fact is an analytic series highlighting what the General Social Survey (GSS) has contributed to understanding Canadian society over the last 20 years.

    The 20 years of GSS data is an opportunity to look back over our years of data and ask: What have we learned about Canadian society over those 20 years?

    This series will include short, focused, single-theme analysis documents. Over the course of the series analysis will include topics on: How satisfied are Canadians with their life in general? What is the relationship between education, work and retirement? What motivates people to retire or to continue working? How do people prepare for retirement? How is the Internet changing the way Canadians live? How are Canadians using their time? What do Canadian families look like? How have they changed in recent years? How are Canadians engaged with their families, neighbours, communities and coworkers? Which Canadians are caring for others? What is the impact of care-giving on people's work, families, leisure time and health? What are the victimization rates for Canadians, and who is most at risk of victimization? How have housing trends changed over the past 20 years? And how have religious practices changed over the past 20 years?

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-624-X
    Description:

    Immigrants to Canada must face numerous difficulties during their first years in the country, the two most important being to find an appropriate job and language barrier. But does a better knowledge of official languages increase the chances for an immigrant of occupying a high-skilled job, a job in the intended occupation, a job similar to the one they had before immigrating, a job related to their training or field of study, or to have a higher hourly rate?

    In an attempt to answer this question, the data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) were used. In the LSIC, a cohort of immigrants was interviewed at three points in time being 6 months, 2 years and 4 years after arrival in the country. For this study, we used the information about the job occupied at the time of each interview, as well as the English and French self-assessed spoken ability levels at each of these moments.

    Release date: 2007-04-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-581-X
    Description:

    This report briefly describes over 100 long-term medical follow-up studies covering topics over the complete life cycle including most age groups and diseases. The research projects examine delayed health outcomes in relation to occupational, environmental, lifestyle, medical and socio-economic factors.

    This inventory of projects carried out since 1978, searchable by themes, will aid in determining earlier research completed using record linkage plus national birth, cancer and death databases for Canada. It outlines the agencies involved, the main investigators at the time of the work, the size of the study population, and provides citations to published findings. This report will be useful for those who make or influence policies, regulations and medical guidelines, and carry out research that affects the health of the population at the industry, community, regional, national or international level.

    Release date: 2006-02-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-615-X
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), conducted jointly by Statistics Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada under the Policy Research Initiative, is a comprehensive survey designed to study the process by which new immigrants adapt to Canadian society. About 12,000 immigrants aged 15 and older who arrived in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001 were interviewed. By late 2005, when all three waves of interviews will have been completed, the survey will provide a better understanding of how the settlement process unfolds for new immigrants.

    The results of this survey will provide valuable information on how immigrants are meeting various challenges associated with integration and what resources are most helpful to their settlement in Canada. The main topics being investigated include housing, education, foreign credentials recognition, employment, income, the development and use of social networks, language skills, health, values and attitudes, and satisfaction with the settlement experience.

    Results from the first wave of the LSIC had shown that labour market integration was a particularly critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. This paper therefore focuses on this issue. The release addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2005-10-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-541-X
    Description:

    This report presents the main results of population projections according to some ethnocultural variables (visible minority group, immigrant status, religion, mother tongue) for Canada, provinces and selected metropolitan areas. Based on the January 1st 2001 estimation of the permanent resident population, results of five projection scenarios from a micro-simulation model that take into account differentials in behaviors and intergenerational transfers are presented for the years 2001 to 2017.

    Release date: 2005-03-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 96-326-X
    Description:

    This work is an updated version of a study published under the same title following the population censuses of 1991 and 1996. The text and tables have been adapted to reflect the more complete data from the 2001 Census, in which the usual questions on knowledge of languages, mother tongue, and language spoken 'most often' at home are supplemented by a question on languages spoken 'regularly' at home , and a two-part question on language use at work, that is, the language used 'most often,' and other languages used 'regularly,' in the workplace. This enrichment of the content has allowed us to expand our analysis while remaining true to the initial goal of presenting in a straightfoward manner basic statistics on the country's demolinguistic reality.

    Release date: 2004-12-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-593-X
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) was developed by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Department of Canadian Heritage in order to provide new and important information on the ethnic and cultural background of people in Canada and how it relates to their lives in Canada today.

    The survey followed the 2001 Census with the census providing the frame for the sample. The target population for the survey was persons aged 15 years or older living in private households in the 10 provinces. The population did not include persons living in collective dwellings, persons living on Indian reserves, persons of Aboriginal origins living off-reserve, or persons living in Northern and remote areas. There was a separate post-censal survey designed for Aboriginal peoples, the Aboriginal Peoples Survey, which was conducted in 2001 and 2002.

    Using the EDS data, this article examines Canada's ethno-cultural mosaic in 2002, providing a portrait of the different generations of Canadians who today make up this country. It also analyses the level of attachment that people in the different generations and ethnic groups have to their own ethno-cultural backgrounds and to the broader Canadian society.

    Release date: 2003-09-29

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