Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (10)

All (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002002
    Description:

    In 1996, 17% of Canada's total population were immigrants, and 88% of them were living in urban regions. The three provinces with the largest urban centres attracted most immigrants: 55% went to Ontario, 18% to British Columbia and 13% to Quebec, a pattern that has remained constant for immigrants who have arrived since 1961. The remaining 12% (or 580,000 people) were living in predominantly rural regions. They can be characterized by the period in which they arrived in Canada.

    Recent and new immigrants were better educated than pre-1981 immigrants, particularly in terms of university education. But pre-1981 immigrants had the highest employment rate and were more likely to have professional service occupations than the Canadian-born. Visible minority immigrants fared worse, in socio-economic terms, than non-visible minority immigrants; these differences were more pronounced in predominantly rural regions. The profiles of immigrants in predominantly rural regions were similar to those in predominantly urban regions. However, the few immigrants who resided in rural northern regions had a very different and more favourable profile.

    Release date: 2002-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S2002001
    Description:

    This is the third in the series of annual reports published by Statistics Canada on the health of Canadians. This supplement highlights communities, with new information that is mainly from the 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). Communities are viewed from several perspectives: geographically, with analyses of the health regions that have been created by provincial health departments; culturally, with articles examining two specific communities-Aboriginal Canadians living off-reserve and immigrants; and socio-economically, with studies of urban neighbourhoods defined by their level of income.

    Canada's 139 health regions are grouped into 10 "peer groups" with similar socio-demographic profiles. Health outcomes and risk factors are compared among and within peer groups.

    Life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy estimates are based on data from the 1996 Census of Canada and the Canadian Vital Statistics Database. Risk factor estimates are based on data from the 2000/01 CCHS.

    Release date: 2002-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002195
    Description:

    Many studies have examined the relative success of immigrant men in the (primarily paid) workforce. Despite the fact that they represent approximately one-sixth of the immigrant workforce, self-employed immigrants are a relatively understudied group. This study uses the 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1996 Census files to assess the success of self-employed immigrant men (compared with self-employed native-born men), using the relative success of paid immigrant men as the benchmark.

    After controlling for various other factors, recent immigrants (those arriving within the last five years) are as likely to be self-employed as the native-born and, over time spent in the country, are more likely to become self-employed. Recent immigrants in the 1990s were far more likely to be self-employed than the native-born. Successive cohorts of recent immigrants have fared progressively worse in the paid labour market compared with paid native-born workers. This is not the case in the self-employed workforce. Although self-employed recent immigrants typically report lower net self-employment income upon entry than the self-employed native-born, the gap has not grown. Instead, it has followed a cyclical movement: narrowing at the peak, and widening in times of weaker economic activity.

    Release date: 2002-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002182
    Description:

    International migration is a joint outcome of the individual's desire to migrate and the host country's selection process. First, the potential migrants apply to a host country, then the host country chooses migrants from the applicant pool. The theoretical focus of the earlier literature was centred on the desire to migrate, while the empirical literature focused on the actual migrants, while migration is the product of these two factors. The objective of this paper is to identify the components of this two-step, decision-making process

    Parameters in the migration model relate directly to policy instruments such as the points awarded for various characteristics. Given the parameter estimates of the model and the general analysis of immigration policy, a study of the factors determining the individual's decision to apply can be done in a way that has not been possible up until now. Using samples of migrants and non-migrants, the model is estimated for migration from two different source countries, the United States and the United Kingdom, to Canada.

    For migrants, a newly available longitudinal data set, the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), has been used. The richness of this database, which surveys immigrants to Canada over a long period and contains information on both their application and subsequent earnings, permits the investigation of a large range of questions that could not be fruitfully addressed before. Estimation of the two-step framework provides important insights on the effects of factors, such as education and income, that help establish this selection process.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20010016268
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    This paper deals with non-response bias, discussing a few approaches in this field. It is demonstrated that non-response bias as to voter turnout is lower in a survey on living conditions than in a purely political survey. In addition, auxiliary information from registrations is used to investigate non-response and its bias among ethnic groups. Response rates among ethnic minority groups are rather low, but there is no evidence that response rates are less in lower social class areas. Correcting for limited socioeconomic deviations does not affect the distributions of political preference.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X2002101
    Description:

    This is the third in the series of annual reports published by Statistics Canada on the health of Canadians. This supplement highlights communities, with new information that is mainly from the 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). Communities are viewed from several perspectives: geographically, with analyses of the health regions that have been created by provincial health departments; culturally, with articles examining two specific communities-Aboriginal Canadians living off-reserve and immigrants; and socio-economically, with studies of urban neighbourhoods defined by their level of income.

    Canada's 139 health regions are grouped into 10 "peer groups" with similar socio-demographic profiles. Health outcomes and risk factors are compared among and within peer groups.

    Life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy estimates are based on data from the 1996 Census of Canada and the Canadian Vital Statistics Database. Risk factor estimates are based on data from the 2000/01 CCHS.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016335
    Description:

    This article compares the health of immigrants at different times since immigration with that of the Canadian-born population, in terms of chronic conditions in general, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer. Health behaviour outcomes are also explored, as is their role in explaining observed health outcomes.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016336
    Description:

    This paper compares immigrants with the Canadian-born population in terms of depression and alcohol dependence. It explores whether the 'healthy immigrant effect' observed for physical health also holds true for mental health. Several sources of diversity among immigrants are also considered.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021058443
    Description:

    Using the Labour Market Activity Survey and the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this article examines the extent to which registered pension plan coverage of immigrants and members of visible minorities differed from that of other Canadians between 1988 and 1998.

    Release date: 2002-05-16

  • Table: 97F0023X
    Description:

    The Topic Bundles (22) are a series of tables that were released as the variables from the 2001 Census of Population became available. Each Topic Bundle contains cross-tabulations for selected levels of geography.

    The release dats of the variables are listed below:Population and Dwelling Counts - March 12, 2002Age and Sex - July 16, 2002Marital Status, Common-law Status, Families, Dwellings and Households - October 22, 2002Language, Mobility and Migration - December 10, 2002Citizenship, Immigration, Birthplace, Generation Status, Ethnic Origin, Visible Minorities, Aboriginal Peoples - January 21, 2003Labour Force Activity, Class of worker, Occupation, Industry, Place of Work, Mode of Transportation, Language of Work, Unpaid Work - February 11, 2003School Attendance, Education, Field of Study, Highest Level of Schooling, Earnings - March 11, 2003Religion, Income of Individuals, Families and Households, Social and Economic Characteristics of Individuals, Families and Households and Housing Costs - May 13, 2003

    Release date: 2002-03-12

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 97F0023X
    Description:

    The Topic Bundles (22) are a series of tables that were released as the variables from the 2001 Census of Population became available. Each Topic Bundle contains cross-tabulations for selected levels of geography.

    The release dats of the variables are listed below:Population and Dwelling Counts - March 12, 2002Age and Sex - July 16, 2002Marital Status, Common-law Status, Families, Dwellings and Households - October 22, 2002Language, Mobility and Migration - December 10, 2002Citizenship, Immigration, Birthplace, Generation Status, Ethnic Origin, Visible Minorities, Aboriginal Peoples - January 21, 2003Labour Force Activity, Class of worker, Occupation, Industry, Place of Work, Mode of Transportation, Language of Work, Unpaid Work - February 11, 2003School Attendance, Education, Field of Study, Highest Level of Schooling, Earnings - March 11, 2003Religion, Income of Individuals, Families and Households, Social and Economic Characteristics of Individuals, Families and Households and Housing Costs - May 13, 2003

    Release date: 2002-03-12

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002002
    Description:

    In 1996, 17% of Canada's total population were immigrants, and 88% of them were living in urban regions. The three provinces with the largest urban centres attracted most immigrants: 55% went to Ontario, 18% to British Columbia and 13% to Quebec, a pattern that has remained constant for immigrants who have arrived since 1961. The remaining 12% (or 580,000 people) were living in predominantly rural regions. They can be characterized by the period in which they arrived in Canada.

    Recent and new immigrants were better educated than pre-1981 immigrants, particularly in terms of university education. But pre-1981 immigrants had the highest employment rate and were more likely to have professional service occupations than the Canadian-born. Visible minority immigrants fared worse, in socio-economic terms, than non-visible minority immigrants; these differences were more pronounced in predominantly rural regions. The profiles of immigrants in predominantly rural regions were similar to those in predominantly urban regions. However, the few immigrants who resided in rural northern regions had a very different and more favourable profile.

    Release date: 2002-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S2002001
    Description:

    This is the third in the series of annual reports published by Statistics Canada on the health of Canadians. This supplement highlights communities, with new information that is mainly from the 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). Communities are viewed from several perspectives: geographically, with analyses of the health regions that have been created by provincial health departments; culturally, with articles examining two specific communities-Aboriginal Canadians living off-reserve and immigrants; and socio-economically, with studies of urban neighbourhoods defined by their level of income.

    Canada's 139 health regions are grouped into 10 "peer groups" with similar socio-demographic profiles. Health outcomes and risk factors are compared among and within peer groups.

    Life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy estimates are based on data from the 1996 Census of Canada and the Canadian Vital Statistics Database. Risk factor estimates are based on data from the 2000/01 CCHS.

    Release date: 2002-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002195
    Description:

    Many studies have examined the relative success of immigrant men in the (primarily paid) workforce. Despite the fact that they represent approximately one-sixth of the immigrant workforce, self-employed immigrants are a relatively understudied group. This study uses the 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1996 Census files to assess the success of self-employed immigrant men (compared with self-employed native-born men), using the relative success of paid immigrant men as the benchmark.

    After controlling for various other factors, recent immigrants (those arriving within the last five years) are as likely to be self-employed as the native-born and, over time spent in the country, are more likely to become self-employed. Recent immigrants in the 1990s were far more likely to be self-employed than the native-born. Successive cohorts of recent immigrants have fared progressively worse in the paid labour market compared with paid native-born workers. This is not the case in the self-employed workforce. Although self-employed recent immigrants typically report lower net self-employment income upon entry than the self-employed native-born, the gap has not grown. Instead, it has followed a cyclical movement: narrowing at the peak, and widening in times of weaker economic activity.

    Release date: 2002-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002182
    Description:

    International migration is a joint outcome of the individual's desire to migrate and the host country's selection process. First, the potential migrants apply to a host country, then the host country chooses migrants from the applicant pool. The theoretical focus of the earlier literature was centred on the desire to migrate, while the empirical literature focused on the actual migrants, while migration is the product of these two factors. The objective of this paper is to identify the components of this two-step, decision-making process

    Parameters in the migration model relate directly to policy instruments such as the points awarded for various characteristics. Given the parameter estimates of the model and the general analysis of immigration policy, a study of the factors determining the individual's decision to apply can be done in a way that has not been possible up until now. Using samples of migrants and non-migrants, the model is estimated for migration from two different source countries, the United States and the United Kingdom, to Canada.

    For migrants, a newly available longitudinal data set, the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), has been used. The richness of this database, which surveys immigrants to Canada over a long period and contains information on both their application and subsequent earnings, permits the investigation of a large range of questions that could not be fruitfully addressed before. Estimation of the two-step framework provides important insights on the effects of factors, such as education and income, that help establish this selection process.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X2002101
    Description:

    This is the third in the series of annual reports published by Statistics Canada on the health of Canadians. This supplement highlights communities, with new information that is mainly from the 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). Communities are viewed from several perspectives: geographically, with analyses of the health regions that have been created by provincial health departments; culturally, with articles examining two specific communities-Aboriginal Canadians living off-reserve and immigrants; and socio-economically, with studies of urban neighbourhoods defined by their level of income.

    Canada's 139 health regions are grouped into 10 "peer groups" with similar socio-demographic profiles. Health outcomes and risk factors are compared among and within peer groups.

    Life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy estimates are based on data from the 1996 Census of Canada and the Canadian Vital Statistics Database. Risk factor estimates are based on data from the 2000/01 CCHS.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016335
    Description:

    This article compares the health of immigrants at different times since immigration with that of the Canadian-born population, in terms of chronic conditions in general, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer. Health behaviour outcomes are also explored, as is their role in explaining observed health outcomes.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016336
    Description:

    This paper compares immigrants with the Canadian-born population in terms of depression and alcohol dependence. It explores whether the 'healthy immigrant effect' observed for physical health also holds true for mental health. Several sources of diversity among immigrants are also considered.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021058443
    Description:

    Using the Labour Market Activity Survey and the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this article examines the extent to which registered pension plan coverage of immigrants and members of visible minorities differed from that of other Canadians between 1988 and 1998.

    Release date: 2002-05-16

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20010016268
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    This paper deals with non-response bias, discussing a few approaches in this field. It is demonstrated that non-response bias as to voter turnout is lower in a survey on living conditions than in a purely political survey. In addition, auxiliary information from registrations is used to investigate non-response and its bias among ethnic groups. Response rates among ethnic minority groups are rather low, but there is no evidence that response rates are less in lower social class areas. Correcting for limited socioeconomic deviations does not affect the distributions of political preference.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

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