Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (168) (25 of 168 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009227
    Description:

    The first assesses how the fertility of immigrant women evolved between 1976-1981 and 1996-2001. It examines whether the fertility behaviour of immigrant women is tending to converge with that of Canadian-born women, and if so, how rapidly this is occurring for different immigrant groups. It also estimates the fertility of immigrants' children, the second-generation of Canadians.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Table: 97F0011X2001046
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001046.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001047
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001047.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001048
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001048.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001040
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001040.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001054
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Aboriginal Peoples of Canada,' which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001054.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001055
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001055.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001045
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001045.

    Release date: 2003-11-19

  • Table: 97F0011X2001044
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001044.

    Release date: 2003-11-19

  • Table: 97F0011X2001050
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001050.

    Release date: 2003-11-19

  • Table: 97F0011X2001051
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB. This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001051.

    Release date: 2003-11-19

  • Table: 97F0011X2001052
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations .

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001052.

    Release date: 2003-11-19

  • Table: 97F0011X2001053
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is also available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001053.

    Release date: 2003-11-19

  • Table: 97F0011X2001042
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001042.

    Release date: 2003-11-19

  • Table: 97F0011X2001043
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001043.

    Release date: 2003-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003197
    Description:

    The economic assimilation of immigrants is a key concern for economists and policy makers. The topic has been widely explored in terms of earnings assimilation of immigrants. Using the 1999 Survey of Financial Security, this study attempts to look at the issue from the wealth perspective.

    Among married families, immigrants have higher wealth than their native-born counterparts from the 40th to 90th percentiles of the distribution, with the wealth gap ranging between $20,000 and $78,000. Among single families, immigrants have higher wealth from the 55th to 95th percentiles, with the wealth gap ranging between $14,000 and $145,000. At the bottom of the distribution, however, evidence suggests that immigrants have lower wealth, although the gap is generally below $10,000. Various decomposition results indicate that the age of the major income recipient (and of the spouse for married families) as well as factors affecting permanent income explain a significant portion of the wealth gap in cases where immigrant families have higher wealth than the native-born. At the bottom of the wealth distribution, however, the wealth gap cannot be explained by the age of the major income recipient, permanent income factors, or family size (or lone-parent status), suggesting that low-wealth immigrant families may behave differently than low-wealth Canadian-born families in their wealth accumulation process.

    The wealth gap is also studied from a cohort perspective. Not surprisingly, recent immigrants have lower wealth than comparable Canadian-born families, and immigrants who arrived before 1976 have higher wealth. While immigrants who arrived in Canada between 1976 and 1985 are widely believed to initially have had more of an earnings disadvantage than their predecessors with respect to the Canadian-born, this study finds that, over the upper segment of the distribution, the wealth of this cohort is not significantly different from that of comparable Canadian-born families. But over the lower portion of the distribution, the cohort has lower wealth.

    Release date: 2003-11-18

  • Table: 97F0010X2001043
    Description:

    This table is part of the 'Ethnocultural Portrait of Canada' topic, which shows 2001 Census data on ethnic groups in Canada, including information on their size, geographic location and demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for Canada's visible minority population.

    Data on the socio-economic characteristics of these populations will be available at a later date. As well, data on religions in Canada will be available in May 2003.

    Additional information on ethnocultural diversity will be available from the Ethnic Diversity Survey in the summer of 2003.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0010XIE2001043.

    Release date: 2003-11-06

  • Table: 97F0010X2001042
    Description:

    This table is part of the 'Ethnocultural Portrait of Canada' topic, which shows 2001 Census data on ethnic groups in Canada, including information on their size, geographic location and demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for Canada's visible minority population.

    Data on the socio-economic characteristics of these populations will be available at a later date. As well, data on religions in Canada will be available in May 2003.

    Additional information on ethnocultural diversity will be available from the Ethnic Diversity Survey in the summer of 2003.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet , Catalogue No. 97F0010XIE2001042.

    Release date: 2003-11-06

  • Table: 97F0010X2001044
    Description:

    This table is part of the 'Ethnocultural Portrait of Canada' topic, which shows 2001 Census data on ethnic groups in Canada, including information on their size, geographic location and demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for Canada's visible minority population.

    Data on the socio-economic characteristics of these populations will be available at a later date. As well, data on religions in Canada will be available in May 2003.

    Additional information on ethnocultural diversity will be available from the Ethnic Diversity Survey in the summer of 2003.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0010XIE2001044.

    Release date: 2003-11-06

  • Table: 97F0010X2001046
    Description:

    This table is part of the 'Ethnocultural Portrait of Canada' topic, which shows 2001 Census data on ethnic groups in Canada, including information on their size, geographic location and demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for Canada's visible minority population.

    Data on the socio-economic characteristics of these populations will be available at a later date. As well, data on religions in Canada will be available in May 2003.

    Additional information on ethnocultural diversity will be available from the Ethnic Diversity Survey in the summer of 2003.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0010XIE2001046.

    Release date: 2003-11-06

  • Table: 97F0010X2001047
    Description:

    This table is part of the 'Ethnocultural Portrait of Canada' topic, which shows 2001 Census data on ethnic groups in Canada, including information on their size, geographic location and demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for Canada's visible minority population.

    Data on the socio-economic characteristics of these populations will be available at a later date. As well, data on religions in Canada will be available in May 2003.

    Additional information on ethnocultural diversity will be available from the Ethnic Diversity Survey in the summer of 2003.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0010XIE2001047.

    Release date: 2003-11-06

  • Table: 97F0009X2001042
    Description:

    This table is part of the 'Immigration and Citizenship' topic, which shows 2001 Census data on immigration trends in Canada. Information is provided on Canada's immigrant or foreign-born population, including its size, origins, geographic distribution and demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for the Canadian-born population and non-permanent residents. Citizenship information from the census shows, for example, the number of immigrants who have acquired Canadian citizenship and the number of Canadians who hold dual citizenship.

    Data on the socio-economic characteristics of these populations are also available.

    The following concepts related to immigration and citizenship are available from the 2001 Census: (1) birthplace of respondent (including province or territory of birth) (2) country of citizenship (3) immigrant status (4) period or year of immigration and (5) age at immigration.

    In addition, for the first time since the 1971 Census, the 2001 Census asked a question on the birthplace of parents. Responses to this question can be used to assess the socio-economic conditions of second-generation Canadians (that is, the Canadian-born children of foreign-born parents).

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0009XIE2001042.

    Release date: 2003-11-06

  • Table: 97F0009X2001043
    Description:

    This table is part of the 'Immigration and Citizenship' topic, which shows 2001 Census data on immigration trends in Canada. Information is provided on Canada's immigrant or foreign-born population, including its size, origins, geographic distribution and demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for the Canadian-born population and non-permanent residents. Citizenship information from the census shows, for example, the number of immigrants who have acquired Canadian citizenship and the number of Canadians who hold dual citizenship.

    Data on the socio-economic characteristics of these populations are also available.

    The following concepts related to immigration and citizenship are available from the 2001 Census: (1) birthplace of respondent (including province or territory of birth) (2) country of citizenship (3) immigrant status (4) period or year of immigration and (5) age at immigration.

    In addition, for the first time since the 1971 Census, the 2001 Census asked a question on the birthplace of parents. Responses to this question can be used to assess the socio-economic conditions of second-generation Canadians (that is, the Canadian-born children of foreign-born parents).

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0009XIE2001043.

    Release date: 2003-11-06

  • Table: 95F0495X2001010
    Description:

    This 2001 Census cumulative profile provides variables for dissolved census subdivisions.

    The profiles are part of the census standard data products, which are data tables extracted from the 2001 Census database. They contain statistical information about all population, household, dwelling and family characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-11-06

  • Table: 97F0010X2001040
    Description:

    This table is part of the 'Ethnocultural Portrait of Canada' topic, which shows 2001 Census data on ethnic groups in Canada, including information on their size, geographic location and demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for Canada's visible minority population.

    Data on the socio-economic characteristics of these populations will be available at a later date. As well, data on religions in Canada will be available in May 2003.

    Additional information on ethnocultural diversity will be available from the Ethnic Diversity Survey in the summer of 2003.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0010XIE2001040.

    Release date: 2003-10-29

Data (152)

Data (152) (25 of 152 results)

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009227
    Description:

    The first assesses how the fertility of immigrant women evolved between 1976-1981 and 1996-2001. It examines whether the fertility behaviour of immigrant women is tending to converge with that of Canadian-born women, and if so, how rapidly this is occurring for different immigrant groups. It also estimates the fertility of immigrants' children, the second-generation of Canadians.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003197
    Description:

    The economic assimilation of immigrants is a key concern for economists and policy makers. The topic has been widely explored in terms of earnings assimilation of immigrants. Using the 1999 Survey of Financial Security, this study attempts to look at the issue from the wealth perspective.

    Among married families, immigrants have higher wealth than their native-born counterparts from the 40th to 90th percentiles of the distribution, with the wealth gap ranging between $20,000 and $78,000. Among single families, immigrants have higher wealth from the 55th to 95th percentiles, with the wealth gap ranging between $14,000 and $145,000. At the bottom of the distribution, however, evidence suggests that immigrants have lower wealth, although the gap is generally below $10,000. Various decomposition results indicate that the age of the major income recipient (and of the spouse for married families) as well as factors affecting permanent income explain a significant portion of the wealth gap in cases where immigrant families have higher wealth than the native-born. At the bottom of the wealth distribution, however, the wealth gap cannot be explained by the age of the major income recipient, permanent income factors, or family size (or lone-parent status), suggesting that low-wealth immigrant families may behave differently than low-wealth Canadian-born families in their wealth accumulation process.

    The wealth gap is also studied from a cohort perspective. Not surprisingly, recent immigrants have lower wealth than comparable Canadian-born families, and immigrants who arrived before 1976 have higher wealth. While immigrants who arrived in Canada between 1976 and 1985 are widely believed to initially have had more of an earnings disadvantage than their predecessors with respect to the Canadian-born, this study finds that, over the upper segment of the distribution, the wealth of this cohort is not significantly different from that of comparable Canadian-born families. But over the lower portion of the distribution, the cohort has lower wealth.

    Release date: 2003-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020036672
    Description:

    This report examines incidence and duration of training for immigrants and compares their circumstances with Canadians in general. It uses data from the Adult Education and Training Survey.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003215
    Description:

    Using census data covering the 1980 to 2000 period, we examine what outcomes would be necessary for cohorts of recent immigrants to achieve earnings parity with Canadian-born workers. Our results show that today's recent immigrants would have to experience a drastic rise of their relative age-earnings profile in the near future for their earnings to converge with their Canadian-born counterparts. The reason is simple: the greater relative earnings growth experienced by cohorts of recent immigrants has only partially offset the drastic deterioration in their relative earnings at entry.

    Release date: 2003-10-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-593-X
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) was developed by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Department of Canadian Heritage in order to provide new and important information on the ethnic and cultural background of people in Canada and how it relates to their lives in Canada today.

    The survey followed the 2001 Census with the census providing the frame for the sample. The target population for the survey was persons aged 15 years or older living in private households in the 10 provinces. The population did not include persons living in collective dwellings, persons living on Indian reserves, persons of Aboriginal origins living off-reserve, or persons living in Northern and remote areas. There was a separate post-censal survey designed for Aboriginal peoples, the Aboriginal Peoples Survey, which was conducted in 2001 and 2002.

    Using the EDS data, this article examines Canada's ethno-cultural mosaic in 2002, providing a portrait of the different generations of Canadians who today make up this country. It also analyses the level of attachment that people in the different generations and ethnic groups have to their own ethno-cultural backgrounds and to the broader Canadian society.

    Release date: 2003-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026633
    Description:

    This article looks at the early employment experiences of three groups of working age immigrants: those who arrived in 1981, in 1991 and in 1996.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026623
    Description:

    Canada has become increasingly multiethnic and multicultural. Immigration over the past 100 years has shaped the country, and each new wave of immigrants has added to the nation's ethnic and cultural diversity. At the time of the 2001 Census, immigrants represented the highest proportion of the population in 70 years, and immigration accounted for more than two-thirds of the population growth in that year. This article explores the changing composition of Canada's immigrants and visible minority groups over the past number of decades.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003203
    Description:

    This study addresses the effects of macroeconomic conditions on the labour market outcomes of immigrants. It simultaneously identifies both the effects of macroeconomic conditions at the time of entry into the labour market and at the time of the survey was taken, while allowing for cohort effects. Also, for the first time in the literature, the impacts on labour force participation along with employment outcomes are explored. The study uses 19 annual cross-sections of the Survey of Consumer Finances, covering the period from 1979 to 1997. The results suggest that the deterioration in the assimilation of recent immigrants is partly due to the adverse economic conditions they face in the year they enter the labour market and the subsequent years following. Macroeconomic conditions at the time of labour market entry have adverse impacts on both labour force participation (LFP) and employment. With the inclusion of controls for macroeconomic conditions, the significance and magnitude of the assimilation-measuring co-efficient increases. Therefore, not only are the estimated cohort effects sensitive to the inclusion of controls for business cycles, but so too are the assimilation profiles.

    Release date: 2003-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003206
    Description:

    Since the 1960s, the social complexion of Toronto's urban landscape has been irreversibly altered as new waves of migrants from Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and Central and South America have replaced traditional white European migrant flows. This product examines the very different residential settlement patterns of Toronto's three largest racial minorities - Blacks, Chinese and South Asians.

    Unlike previous studies based on aggregate level data and 'ecological' correlations, this product assesses the capacity of conventional spatial assimilation theory to account for these differences, using 'locational attainment' models estimated with micro-data from the 1996 Census of Canada. Conclusions show that the residential settlement patterns of South Asians and, strikingly, Blacks fit the expectations of the conventional spatial assimilation model rather well. Initial settlement is in disadvantaged immigrant enclaves from which longer-term, more successful migrants subsequently exit as they purchase homes in more affluent neighbourhoods. Although Toronto's 'Black neighbourhoods' are decidedly poorer than other minority neighbourhoods, most Blacks do not live in these neighbourhoods. In contrast, Chinese immigrants move quickly to purchase homes in somewhat more affluent and enduring ethnic communities. This product shows that, rather than being historically novel, however, the Chinese are replicating the settlement pattern of earlier southern European (particularly Italian) immigrants and for much the same reasons (i.e., relative advantage in the housing market and low levels of language assimilation).

    Release date: 2003-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003204
    Description:

    Using Census data from 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1996, this study examined the association between living in a visible minority enclave and immigrants' labour market outcomes in Canada's three largest cities. The results showed that the number of such enclaves, defined as census tracts with at least 30% of the population from a single visible minority group (Chinese, South Asian or Black), increased from 6 in 1981 to 142 in 1996, mostly in Toronto and Vancouver. The association between exposure to own-group neighbours and employment was at times negative, but generally not significant. Exposure to own-group neighbours and working in a segregated occupation was positively, but not significantly, associated. Little association existed between exposure and employment earnings. However, there were some important group differences. The associations between exposure to own-group neighbours and labour market outcomes were usually very weak among Chinese immigrants, but often negative and strong among Black immigrants.

    Release date: 2003-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003198
    Description:

    This study uses census data to focus on low-income among immigrants, and asks a number of questions: (1) have low-income rates increased among successive cohorts of entering immigrants, both in absolute terms and relative to the Canadian born (they have), (2) is this increase due to changes in their characteristics (e.g. education, age, source country, language etc.), (3) do low-income rates fall as new immigrants acquire Canadian experience, and are there signs that low-income rates fall faster among the more recent entering cohorts with the higher entry level rates, resulting in some "catch-up", and (4) in the major Canadian cities, to what extent was the deterioration in the city level low-income rates during the 1990s concentrated among immigrants? The analysis covers the period from 1980 to 2000, and focuses on change between 1980 to 1990, and 1990 to 2000, years that are roughly at business cycle peaks.

    Basically, low-income rates have been falling over the past two decades among the Canadian born, and rising among immigrants. A discussion of the possible determinants of the trends mentioned above is included in the literature review and the conclusion.

    Release date: 2003-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001009
    Description:

    This topic presents the Canadian labour force trends over the past decade in light of the three key factors that have shaped the nation's workforce: a demand for skills in the face of globalization and the 'knowledge economy'; a working-age population increasingly made up of older persons; and a growing reliance on immigration as a source of skills and labour force growth. Numerous colour maps, charts and tables illustrate the latest provincial, territorial and metropolitan labour force trends observed from the 2001 Census of Population and Housing.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003196
    Description:

    This paper uses the Statistics Canada Survey of Literacy Skills Used in Daily Activities (LSUDA) to investigate minority-white income differences and the role cognitive skills play in those patterns. Some minority groups have substantially lower (tested) levels of literacy and numeracy skills than whites and other more economically successful minorities and, in the case of certain male groups, these differences play a significant role in explaining the observed income patterns. The ethnic-white income gaps are, however, much smaller for women, and the literacy and numeracy variables do not have much of a role to play in explaining those differences. Various policy implications are discussed.

    Release date: 2003-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001007
    Description:

    This topic presents data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. These data show the growth of the Aboriginal population, the age characteristics, Aboriginal languages, the living arrangements of Aboriginal children, the geographic mobility of Aboriginal people and where they live. Data are also provided on the North American Indians, Métis and Inuit.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001008
    Description:

    This analytic document presents new information from the 2001 Census on the ethnocultural portrait of Canada. The analysis is divided into three themes: historical and recent immigration trends; growth and composition of the visible minority population; and ethnic origins of the population. The immigration theme also focusses on the characteristics and settlement patterns of immigrants who came to Canada in the past 10 years, that is, the 1990 immigrants. These three themes are examined at the national and provincial/territorial geographical levels and for census metropolitan areas.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-01-21

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-611-X
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), conducted jointly by Statistics Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada under the Policy Research Initiative, is a comprehensive survey designed to study the process by which new immigrants adapt to Canadian society. About 12,000 immigrants aged 15 and older who arrived in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001 were interviewed. By late 2005, when all three waves of interviews will have been completed, the survey will provide a better understanding of how the settlement process unfolds for new immigrants.

    The results of this survey will provide valuable information on how immigrants are meeting various challenges associated with integration and what resources are most helpful to their settlement in Canada. The main topics being investigated include housing, education, foreign credentials recognition, employment, income, the development and use of social networks, language skills, health, values and attitudes, and satisfaction with the settlement experience.

    Release date: 2003-09-04

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