Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (10)

All (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2006010
    Description:

    This report paints a statistical portrait of socio-economic conditions in the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) of Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. It highlights trends in population growth, suburban growth, commuting, employment, unemployment, immigration, income and low-income and socio-economic conditions among immigrants, Aboriginal People, and others. It uses data from the 1981 to 2001 Censuses of Canada, the 2005 Labour Force Historical Review, and Income in Canada, 2004.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Technical products: 12-002-X20060019253
    Description:

    Before any analytical results are released from the Research Data Centres (RDCs), RDC analysts must conduct disclosure risk analysis (or vetting). RDC analysts apply Statistics Canada's disclosure control guidelines, when reviewing all analytical output, as a means of ensuring the protection of survey respondents' confidentiality. For some data sets, such as the Aboriginal People's Survey (APS), Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS), the Participation, Activity and Limitation Survey (PALS) and the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), Statistics Canada has developed an additional set of guidelines that involve rounding analytical results, in order to ensure further confidentiality protection. This article will discuss the rationale for the additional rounding procedures used for these data sets, and describe the specifics of the rounding guidelines. More importantly, this paper will suggest several approaches to assist researchers in following these protocols more effectively and efficiently.

    Release date: 2006-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019181
    Description:

    This article uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) and the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) to track the religious views and practices of Canadians and identify those groups most likely to be religious. An index of religiosity is developed based on the presence of religious affiliation, frequency of attendance at religious services, frequency of private religious practices and the importance of religion to the respondent.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Public use microdata: 95M0016X
    Description:

    This file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2001 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2001 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. Three files are available: the Individuals File, the Families File, and the Households and Housing File.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    Note: Please be advised that errors have been detected in the data for two variables contained on the revised version of this CD-ROM. As well, we have added a unique record identifier called PPSORT, built/included in the file for administrative purposes only.The affected variables are:Income status (2000 low income cut-offs) (INCSTP)Ethnic origin (ETHNICRA)Further details can be found in the "Errata" file offered in several formats on the new, re-issued CD-ROM.Original release date - February 8, 20051rst Correction - released August 24, 20052nd Correction - released April 26, 2006

    Release date: 2006-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049127
    Description:

    Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS), this article examines the preservation of ancestral languages by looking at the extent to which allophone immigrants (i.e. those whose mother tongue is neither English nor French) have transmitted their mother tongue to their Canadian-born children. The analysis focuses on the factors associated with the probability of the ancestral language being the respondent's mother tongue, the respondent's ability to speak the ancestral language, and his or her regular use of this language in the home.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050059112
    Description:

    This article draws on the results of the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to examine the skill profiles of Canadians in four domains: prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving. Skill levels are compared for three groups: the Canadian-born, recent immigrants (those who have been in Canada for 10 years or less) and established immigrants (those who have been in Canada for more than 10 years). Other dimensions considered are age, education and mother tongue.

    Release date: 2006-02-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-581-X
    Description:

    This report briefly describes over 100 long-term medical follow-up studies covering topics over the complete life cycle including most age groups and diseases. The research projects examine delayed health outcomes in relation to occupational, environmental, lifestyle, medical and socio-economic factors.

    This inventory of projects carried out since 1978, searchable by themes, will aid in determining earlier research completed using record linkage plus national birth, cancer and death databases for Canada. It outlines the agencies involved, the main investigators at the time of the work, the size of the study population, and provides citations to published findings. This report will be useful for those who make or influence policies, regulations and medical guidelines, and carry out research that affects the health of the population at the industry, community, regional, national or international level.

    Release date: 2006-02-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Public use microdata: 95M0016X
    Description:

    This file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2001 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2001 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. Three files are available: the Individuals File, the Families File, and the Households and Housing File.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    Note: Please be advised that errors have been detected in the data for two variables contained on the revised version of this CD-ROM. As well, we have added a unique record identifier called PPSORT, built/included in the file for administrative purposes only.The affected variables are:Income status (2000 low income cut-offs) (INCSTP)Ethnic origin (ETHNICRA)Further details can be found in the "Errata" file offered in several formats on the new, re-issued CD-ROM.Original release date - February 8, 20051rst Correction - released August 24, 20052nd Correction - released April 26, 2006

    Release date: 2006-04-26

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2006010
    Description:

    This report paints a statistical portrait of socio-economic conditions in the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) of Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. It highlights trends in population growth, suburban growth, commuting, employment, unemployment, immigration, income and low-income and socio-economic conditions among immigrants, Aboriginal People, and others. It uses data from the 1981 to 2001 Censuses of Canada, the 2005 Labour Force Historical Review, and Income in Canada, 2004.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019181
    Description:

    This article uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) and the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) to track the religious views and practices of Canadians and identify those groups most likely to be religious. An index of religiosity is developed based on the presence of religious affiliation, frequency of attendance at religious services, frequency of private religious practices and the importance of religion to the respondent.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049127
    Description:

    Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS), this article examines the preservation of ancestral languages by looking at the extent to which allophone immigrants (i.e. those whose mother tongue is neither English nor French) have transmitted their mother tongue to their Canadian-born children. The analysis focuses on the factors associated with the probability of the ancestral language being the respondent's mother tongue, the respondent's ability to speak the ancestral language, and his or her regular use of this language in the home.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050059112
    Description:

    This article draws on the results of the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to examine the skill profiles of Canadians in four domains: prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving. Skill levels are compared for three groups: the Canadian-born, recent immigrants (those who have been in Canada for 10 years or less) and established immigrants (those who have been in Canada for more than 10 years). Other dimensions considered are age, education and mother tongue.

    Release date: 2006-02-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-581-X
    Description:

    This report briefly describes over 100 long-term medical follow-up studies covering topics over the complete life cycle including most age groups and diseases. The research projects examine delayed health outcomes in relation to occupational, environmental, lifestyle, medical and socio-economic factors.

    This inventory of projects carried out since 1978, searchable by themes, will aid in determining earlier research completed using record linkage plus national birth, cancer and death databases for Canada. It outlines the agencies involved, the main investigators at the time of the work, the size of the study population, and provides citations to published findings. This report will be useful for those who make or influence policies, regulations and medical guidelines, and carry out research that affects the health of the population at the industry, community, regional, national or international level.

    Release date: 2006-02-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 12-002-X20060019253
    Description:

    Before any analytical results are released from the Research Data Centres (RDCs), RDC analysts must conduct disclosure risk analysis (or vetting). RDC analysts apply Statistics Canada's disclosure control guidelines, when reviewing all analytical output, as a means of ensuring the protection of survey respondents' confidentiality. For some data sets, such as the Aboriginal People's Survey (APS), Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS), the Participation, Activity and Limitation Survey (PALS) and the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), Statistics Canada has developed an additional set of guidelines that involve rounding analytical results, in order to ensure further confidentiality protection. This article will discuss the rationale for the additional rounding procedures used for these data sets, and describe the specifics of the rounding guidelines. More importantly, this paper will suggest several approaches to assist researchers in following these protocols more effectively and efficiently.

    Release date: 2006-07-18

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