Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (24)

All (24) (24 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911211055
    Description:

    The decline in earnings among immigrants over the past quarter century is well-documented, but its impact on various segments of the immigrant population is less well-known. This study examines long-term trends in the incidence of low income among working-age immigrants, immigrant seniors and the children of immigrants. The study looks at two main factors that contribute to the incidence of low income: market income and government transfers.

    Release date: 2009-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211058
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2009001
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    The first two reports analyzed the 2006 labour market experiences of immigrants. The third report updates many of these characteristics for 2007, including analysis by province, sex, educational attainment and selected age groups. The fourth report analyzed 2007 employment rates for immigrants based on where they obtained their highest postsecondary education. This fifth report analyzed employment quality characteristics of immigrants using 2008 data.

    Release date: 2009-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008002
    Description:

    Using 2006 Census of Population data, this bulletin profiles rural immigrants by five themes: immigrants as a percent of the total population, immigrant period of arrival, immigrant region of birth, migration of recent immigrants and finally a ranking of rural regions in terms of the number of immigrants as a percent of the total population in each rural region.

    Release date: 2009-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008315
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this paper asks (1) whether the changing characteristics of immigrants, notably the rise in the share with university education and in the "skilled economic" immigrant class, contributed positively to immigrant entry earnings during the 1990s, and (2) whether the entry earnings of immigrants improved after 2000, and if not, why not.

    We find that, through the 1990s, the rising number of entering immigrants with university degrees and in the skilled economic class did little to improve earnings at the bottom of the earnings distribution (and reduce poverty rates among entering immigrants), but the changes did increase earnings among immigrants at the middle and top of the earnings distribution. The increasing numbers of highly educated at the bottom of the earnings distribution were unable to convert their education and "skilled class" designation to higher earnings: they found themselves with low incomes. These outcomes may be related to language, credentialism, education quality, or supply issues, as discussed in the paper.

    We find that from 2000 to 2004, the entry earnings of immigrants renewed their slide, but for reasons that differed from the standard explanations of the earlier decline. Much of the fall after 2000 was concentrated among immigrants intending to practice in the information technology (IT) or engineering occupations. This coincided with the IT downturn, which appears to have significantly affected outcomes for these immigrants, particularly the men. Following the significant increase in supply in response to the call for more high-tech workers in the late 1990s, the large numbers of entering immigrants were faced with the IT downturn.

    Release date: 2009-04-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-639-X
    Description:

    Beginning in late 2006, the Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division of Statistics Canada embarked on the process of review of questions used in the Census and in surveys to produce data about Aboriginal peoples (North American Indian, Métis and Inuit). This process is essential to ensure that Aboriginal identification questions are valid measures of contemporary Aboriginal identification, in all its complexity. Questions reviewed included the following (from the Census 2B questionnaire):- the Ethnic origin / Aboriginal ancestry question;- the Aboriginal identity question;- the Treaty / Registered Indian question; and- the Indian band / First Nation Membership question.

    Additional testing was conducted on Census questions with potential Aboriginal response options: the population group question (also known as visible minorities), and the Religion question. The review process to date has involved two major steps: regional discussions with data users and stakeholders, and qualitative testing. The regional discussions with over 350 users of Aboriginal data across Canada were held in early 2007 to examine the four questions used on the Census and other surveys of Statistics Canada. Data users included National Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Provincial and Territorial Organizations, Federal, Provincial and local governments, researchers and Aboriginal service organizations. User feedback showed that main areas of concern were data quality, undercoverage, the wording of questions, and the importance of comparability over time.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811210766
    Description:

    During the 1991 to 2006 period, the proportion of immigrants with a university degree in jobs with low educational requirements increased, not only among recent immigrants but also among established ones. The increases for established immigrants suggest that the difficulties, which have long plagued recent immigrants, are not necessarily temporary. Changes in the profile of established immigrants - particularly language and country of origin - accounted for only a quarter of the deterioration for established immigrants.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800510798
    Description:

    In a recent Statistics Canada study, Aneta Bonikowska, David Green and Craig Riddell (2008) use data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to measure the literacy skills of immigrants and the Canadian-born and relate these to earnings outcomes. The analysis takes into account standard demographic information, along with information on where education was obtained and age of migration to further refine their analysis of immigrant/Canadian-born earnings differentials. This article summarizes the results of their research.

    Release date: 2009-03-04

  • Table: 89-628-X2009012
    Description:

    The following fact sheet is a profile of Canadians 15 years of age and older, who reported having a hearing limitation. It is important to note that this includes people who are completely deaf, deafened , hard of hearing or have some hearing loss. This fact sheet examines the areas of education, employment, computer usage, and aids and assistive devices.

    Release date: 2009-02-26

  • Table: 89-628-X2009013
    Description:

    The following fact sheet is a profile of Canadians 15 years of age and older, who reported having a seeing limitation. It is important to note that this includes people who are legally blind, have low vision or have milder seeing conditions. This fact sheet examines the areas of education, employment, computer usage, aids and assistive devices, and transportation.

    Release date: 2009-02-26

  • Table: 89-628-X2009014
    Description:

    The following fact sheet is a profile of Canadians 15 years of age and older, who reported having a learning limitation. The respondents' answers to the limitation questions represent their perception of the situation and are therefore subjective. This fact sheet examines education, employment, help received, aids and assistive devices, and Internet usage. While the information provided in this fact sheet pertains to adults, a brief overview of children with learning limitations is also provided.

    Release date: 2009-02-26

  • Table: 97-555-X2006057
    Description:

    Language data for Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Language,' which presents data on the language composition of Canada, by mother tongue and other variables, as well as on languages spoken at home and knowledge of English, French and non-official languages. This topic also presents data on the language used most often at work, as well as on any other languages used at work on a regular basis, by mother tongue and other sociocultural characteristics.

    These data were collected for a 20% sample of the Canadian population. Only the data for mother tongue were collected for the entire population.

    This table can be found in the DVD-ROM: Portrait of Official-language Communities in Canada, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 92-592-XVB.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-555-XWE2006057.

    Release date: 2009-01-22

  • Table: 97-555-X2006058
    Description:

    Language data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Language,' which presents data on the language composition of Canada, by mother tongue and other variables, as well as on languages spoken at home and knowledge of English, French and non-official languages. This topic also presents data on the language used most often at work, as well as on any other languages used at work on a regular basis, by mother tongue and other sociocultural characteristics.

    These data were collected for a 20% sample of the Canadian population. Only the data for mother tongue were collected for the entire population.

    This table can be found in the DVD-ROM: Portrait of Official-language Communities in Canada, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 92-592-XVB.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-555-XWE2006058.

    Release date: 2009-01-22

  • Table: 97-555-X2006059
    Description:

    Language data for Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Language,' which presents data on the language composition of Canada, by mother tongue and other variables, as well as on languages spoken at home and knowledge of English, French and non-official languages. This topic also presents data on the language used most often at work, as well as on any other languages used at work on a regular basis, by mother tongue and other sociocultural characteristics.

    These data were collected for a 20% sample of the Canadian population. Only the data for mother tongue were collected for the entire population.

    This table can be found in the DVD-ROM: Portrait of Official-language Communities in Canada, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 92-592-XVB.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-555-XWE2006059.

    Release date: 2009-01-22

  • Table: 97-555-X2006060
    Description:

    Language data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Language,' which presents data on the language composition of Canada, by mother tongue and other variables, as well as on languages spoken at home and knowledge of English, French and non-official languages. This topic also presents data on the language used most often at work, as well as on any other languages used at work on a regular basis, by mother tongue and other sociocultural characteristics.

    These data were collected for a 20% sample of the Canadian population. Only the data for mother tongue were collected for the entire population.

    This table can be found in the DVD-ROM: Portrait of Official-language Communities in Canada, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 92-592-XVB.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-555-XWE2006060.

    Release date: 2009-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110770
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 2006 Census of Canada to look at the use of non-official languages at work among immigrants. Owing to the growing contribution that immigrants are making to Canada's labour force, languages other than English and French are being used more often in Canadian work places. The article examines which languages are used most often. It also looks at the impact of age, gender, year of immigration, education, official language ability and the presence of others who speak the mother tongue in the community where they work, on the likelihood that immigrants will use a non-official language on the job.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110771
    Description:

    This article explores the implications of working in a language other than English or French for immigrants in Canada. It looks at the occupations and industries in which immigrants who use non-official languages on the job are found. Holding other factors constant, it also looks at the impact on employment earnings and the financial returns to education for immigrants who work in languages other than English or French.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

Data (14)

Data (14) (14 of 14 results)

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911211055
    Description:

    The decline in earnings among immigrants over the past quarter century is well-documented, but its impact on various segments of the immigrant population is less well-known. This study examines long-term trends in the incidence of low income among working-age immigrants, immigrant seniors and the children of immigrants. The study looks at two main factors that contribute to the incidence of low income: market income and government transfers.

    Release date: 2009-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211058
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2009001
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    The first two reports analyzed the 2006 labour market experiences of immigrants. The third report updates many of these characteristics for 2007, including analysis by province, sex, educational attainment and selected age groups. The fourth report analyzed 2007 employment rates for immigrants based on where they obtained their highest postsecondary education. This fifth report analyzed employment quality characteristics of immigrants using 2008 data.

    Release date: 2009-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008002
    Description:

    Using 2006 Census of Population data, this bulletin profiles rural immigrants by five themes: immigrants as a percent of the total population, immigrant period of arrival, immigrant region of birth, migration of recent immigrants and finally a ranking of rural regions in terms of the number of immigrants as a percent of the total population in each rural region.

    Release date: 2009-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008315
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this paper asks (1) whether the changing characteristics of immigrants, notably the rise in the share with university education and in the "skilled economic" immigrant class, contributed positively to immigrant entry earnings during the 1990s, and (2) whether the entry earnings of immigrants improved after 2000, and if not, why not.

    We find that, through the 1990s, the rising number of entering immigrants with university degrees and in the skilled economic class did little to improve earnings at the bottom of the earnings distribution (and reduce poverty rates among entering immigrants), but the changes did increase earnings among immigrants at the middle and top of the earnings distribution. The increasing numbers of highly educated at the bottom of the earnings distribution were unable to convert their education and "skilled class" designation to higher earnings: they found themselves with low incomes. These outcomes may be related to language, credentialism, education quality, or supply issues, as discussed in the paper.

    We find that from 2000 to 2004, the entry earnings of immigrants renewed their slide, but for reasons that differed from the standard explanations of the earlier decline. Much of the fall after 2000 was concentrated among immigrants intending to practice in the information technology (IT) or engineering occupations. This coincided with the IT downturn, which appears to have significantly affected outcomes for these immigrants, particularly the men. Following the significant increase in supply in response to the call for more high-tech workers in the late 1990s, the large numbers of entering immigrants were faced with the IT downturn.

    Release date: 2009-04-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-639-X
    Description:

    Beginning in late 2006, the Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division of Statistics Canada embarked on the process of review of questions used in the Census and in surveys to produce data about Aboriginal peoples (North American Indian, Métis and Inuit). This process is essential to ensure that Aboriginal identification questions are valid measures of contemporary Aboriginal identification, in all its complexity. Questions reviewed included the following (from the Census 2B questionnaire):- the Ethnic origin / Aboriginal ancestry question;- the Aboriginal identity question;- the Treaty / Registered Indian question; and- the Indian band / First Nation Membership question.

    Additional testing was conducted on Census questions with potential Aboriginal response options: the population group question (also known as visible minorities), and the Religion question. The review process to date has involved two major steps: regional discussions with data users and stakeholders, and qualitative testing. The regional discussions with over 350 users of Aboriginal data across Canada were held in early 2007 to examine the four questions used on the Census and other surveys of Statistics Canada. Data users included National Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Provincial and Territorial Organizations, Federal, Provincial and local governments, researchers and Aboriginal service organizations. User feedback showed that main areas of concern were data quality, undercoverage, the wording of questions, and the importance of comparability over time.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811210766
    Description:

    During the 1991 to 2006 period, the proportion of immigrants with a university degree in jobs with low educational requirements increased, not only among recent immigrants but also among established ones. The increases for established immigrants suggest that the difficulties, which have long plagued recent immigrants, are not necessarily temporary. Changes in the profile of established immigrants - particularly language and country of origin - accounted for only a quarter of the deterioration for established immigrants.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800510798
    Description:

    In a recent Statistics Canada study, Aneta Bonikowska, David Green and Craig Riddell (2008) use data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to measure the literacy skills of immigrants and the Canadian-born and relate these to earnings outcomes. The analysis takes into account standard demographic information, along with information on where education was obtained and age of migration to further refine their analysis of immigrant/Canadian-born earnings differentials. This article summarizes the results of their research.

    Release date: 2009-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110770
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 2006 Census of Canada to look at the use of non-official languages at work among immigrants. Owing to the growing contribution that immigrants are making to Canada's labour force, languages other than English and French are being used more often in Canadian work places. The article examines which languages are used most often. It also looks at the impact of age, gender, year of immigration, education, official language ability and the presence of others who speak the mother tongue in the community where they work, on the likelihood that immigrants will use a non-official language on the job.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110771
    Description:

    This article explores the implications of working in a language other than English or French for immigrants in Canada. It looks at the occupations and industries in which immigrants who use non-official languages on the job are found. Holding other factors constant, it also looks at the impact on employment earnings and the financial returns to education for immigrants who work in languages other than English or French.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

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