Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (13)

All (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913257
    Description:

    Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, this study sheds light on a specific aspect of newcomers' settlement-recognition of their foreign credentials and work experience in relation to their individual characteristics. These characteristics range from class of immigrant (skilled-worker principal applicants, family class, refugees, etc.), education and field of study to country where the highest credential was earned, and knowledge of English or French. The study also examines foreign credential and work experience recognition at three time points over a four-year period-six months, two years and four years after landing.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000411339
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey, this article examines trends in high school dropout rates over the 1990/1991 to 2009/2010 period. The high school dropout rate is defined as the share of 20 to 24 year-olds who are not attending school and who have not graduated from high school. In addition, national data for both Aboriginal people and immigrants are now available from the Labour Force Survey, allowing researchers to assess how dropout rates differ between these groups and the rest of the population. Finally, the article also examines trends in labour market outcomes of dropouts in terms of unemployment rates and median weekly earnings.

    Release date: 2010-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010084
    Description:

    The successful integration of immigrants into the Canadian labour market is of interest to Canadian public policy and to current and potential immigrants, alike. Using data from the 2006 Census of Population, this report aims to develop a better understanding of the integration of internationally-trained educated immigrants into the Canadian labour market compared to those (Canadian-born or other immigrants) who completed their education in Canada i.e., Are they working in an occupation related to their field of study or in an equivalent occupation? What are their working conditions and earnings? In doing so, this report presents a socio-demographic profile of internationally-educated immigrants upon their arrival in Canada and examines their labour market outcomes by time elapsed since landing.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211166
    Description:

    This study examines the growing number of non-permanent residents who work temporarily in Canada. They are compared with permanent residents in terms of demographic characteristics, location, occupations and earnings. Census data show that while the numbers destined to skilled work has been increasing, most non-permanent residents are found in relatively unskilled occupations. Reflecting the occupations in which they work, foreign nationals working temporarily in Canada tend to be paid less than are comparable Canadian born and established immigrant workers

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010081
    Description:

    International comparisons show that the percentage of both college- and university-educated workers who earn less than half of the median employment income is higher than in Canada than in most, if not all, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) show that 18% of university-educated adults and 23% of college-educated adults aged 25 to 64 in Canada earned less than half the national median employment income in 2006.

    This study uses descriptive statistics and logistic regression techniques in order to shed light on the type of highly educated worker who is likely to fall into lower employment earnings, taking into account a range of characteristics, including age, sex, field of study, occupation and industry. While all of the workers in the study population had non-zero employment earnings, many of them reported an activity other than working as their main activity for the year, a key factor in explaining their low-earnings situation. Other factors associated with having a college or university education while also having low employment earnings include being self-employed, working in certain occupations or industries and being female.

    Release date: 2010-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201000111102
    Description:

    For many Canadians, the first point of contact for medical care is their doctor. Not having a regular medical doctor is associated with fewer visits with general practitioners or specialists, who can play a role in screening and treating medical conditions early. Over the past decade, the percentage of Canadians who report having a regular medical doctor has declined.

    Release date: 2010-04-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-641-X
    Description:

    This report concerns French-language immigration outside Quebec and its recent evolution, focusing on its numbers, its geographic distribution and its demographic and social characteristics. This statistical portrait will mainly use the concept of first official language spoken (FOLS), which is now widely used as a criterion for a person's linguistic identity in studies on official language minorities. The Francophone immigrant population outside Quebec is comprised of two groups: those who have only French as their first official language spoken (French FOLS immigrants) and those who have both French and English (French-English FOLS immigrants).

    The Francophone immigrant population living outside Quebec is fairly small, both in absolute numbers and in relation to either the French-speaking population or the immigrant population as a whole. However, the relative weight of Francophone immigrants within the French-speaking population has increased, going from 6.2% to 10% between 1991 and 2006, while their weight within the overall immigrant population has varied more moderately, and in 2006 it was, at most, less than 2%.

    The majority of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec 70% are concentrated in Ontario. Furthermore, two-thirds of French-speaking immigrants live in three metropolitan areas: Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In Canada outside Quebec, French-English FOLS immigrants, numbering 76,100 in the 2006 Census, are slightly more numerous than French FOLS immigrants, who number 60,900. In some cities, especially Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary, this characteristic is more prevalent, with French-English FOLS immigrants outnumbering their French FOLS counterparts by almost two to one. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these two FOLS groups are sometimes quite different.

    International immigration to Canada has undergone a rapid transformation in recent decades. Immigrants of European origin have tended to give way to immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this regard, French FOLS immigrants stand out from other immigrants in that a large proportion of them come from Africa. One of the consequences of this trend has been to change the composition of the French FOLS immigrant population; in 2006, Blacks made up 26% of that population, compared to 5% of the other two immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010213244
    Description:

    This study focuses on university graduates whose studies would normally lead to employment in a regulated occupation such as medicine, law or education. It uses the 2006 Census to compute the proportion or match rates'of such graduates working in the occupations for which they studied. The match rates for immigrants are then compared to similar groups of the Canadian-born. The study also compares the types of jobs held by immigrants and the Canadian-born not working in occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2010-03-23

  • Public use microdata: 95M0028X
    Description:

    This individuals file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2006 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2006 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    With 123 variables, this comprehensive tool is excellent for policy analysts, pollsters, social researchers and anyone interested in modelling and performing statistical regression analysis using census data.

    Note: Users will require knowledge of data manipulation packages such as SAS or SPSS to be able to use the data contained in these files.

    Release date: 2010-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010322
    Description:

    In this paper, the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) is used to examine how immigrants in the 2000-2001 landing cohort subjectively assess their life in Canada. The paper provides a useful complement to other studies of immigrant outcomes that often focus on employment, income or health. Four years after landing, about three-quarters of LSIC respondents said they were satisfied or very satisfied with their life in Canada, and a comparable proportion said their expectations of life in Canada had been met or exceeded. Nearly 9 out of 10 said that, if given the chance, they would make the same decision again to come to Canada. A broad range of demographic, social and economic characteristics are associated with subjective assessments. Positive assessments of life in Canada are less prevalent among individuals in their thirties and forties, and university graduates and principal applicants in the skilled worker admission category, than they are among other groups. While assessments of life in Canada are correlated with economic factors such as personal income, they are also correlated with social factors such as relationships with neighbours and perceptions of discrimination.

    Release date: 2010-02-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-229-X
    Description:

    This report examines the health of Canadians by focusing on demography, health status, health behaviours, and the environment. The aging of the population provides a context for the report. Measures that reflect physical, mental and social well-being are presented, followed by indicators of positive and negative behaviours that are known to influence health status. Finally, indicators of the social and physical environments in which we live and work are examined. Together, these Health Indicators highlight the health of Canadians at a national and provincial/territorial level. They provide benchmarks for comparisons over time and place, from regional to international levels.

    This report celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Health Indicators project. Since 1999, Statistics Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information have collaborated on developing and providing a broad range of indicators for health regions across Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-11

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Public use microdata: 95M0028X
    Description:

    This individuals file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2006 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2006 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    With 123 variables, this comprehensive tool is excellent for policy analysts, pollsters, social researchers and anyone interested in modelling and performing statistical regression analysis using census data.

    Note: Users will require knowledge of data manipulation packages such as SAS or SPSS to be able to use the data contained in these files.

    Release date: 2010-03-04

Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913257
    Description:

    Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, this study sheds light on a specific aspect of newcomers' settlement-recognition of their foreign credentials and work experience in relation to their individual characteristics. These characteristics range from class of immigrant (skilled-worker principal applicants, family class, refugees, etc.), education and field of study to country where the highest credential was earned, and knowledge of English or French. The study also examines foreign credential and work experience recognition at three time points over a four-year period-six months, two years and four years after landing.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000411339
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey, this article examines trends in high school dropout rates over the 1990/1991 to 2009/2010 period. The high school dropout rate is defined as the share of 20 to 24 year-olds who are not attending school and who have not graduated from high school. In addition, national data for both Aboriginal people and immigrants are now available from the Labour Force Survey, allowing researchers to assess how dropout rates differ between these groups and the rest of the population. Finally, the article also examines trends in labour market outcomes of dropouts in terms of unemployment rates and median weekly earnings.

    Release date: 2010-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010084
    Description:

    The successful integration of immigrants into the Canadian labour market is of interest to Canadian public policy and to current and potential immigrants, alike. Using data from the 2006 Census of Population, this report aims to develop a better understanding of the integration of internationally-trained educated immigrants into the Canadian labour market compared to those (Canadian-born or other immigrants) who completed their education in Canada i.e., Are they working in an occupation related to their field of study or in an equivalent occupation? What are their working conditions and earnings? In doing so, this report presents a socio-demographic profile of internationally-educated immigrants upon their arrival in Canada and examines their labour market outcomes by time elapsed since landing.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211166
    Description:

    This study examines the growing number of non-permanent residents who work temporarily in Canada. They are compared with permanent residents in terms of demographic characteristics, location, occupations and earnings. Census data show that while the numbers destined to skilled work has been increasing, most non-permanent residents are found in relatively unskilled occupations. Reflecting the occupations in which they work, foreign nationals working temporarily in Canada tend to be paid less than are comparable Canadian born and established immigrant workers

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010081
    Description:

    International comparisons show that the percentage of both college- and university-educated workers who earn less than half of the median employment income is higher than in Canada than in most, if not all, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) show that 18% of university-educated adults and 23% of college-educated adults aged 25 to 64 in Canada earned less than half the national median employment income in 2006.

    This study uses descriptive statistics and logistic regression techniques in order to shed light on the type of highly educated worker who is likely to fall into lower employment earnings, taking into account a range of characteristics, including age, sex, field of study, occupation and industry. While all of the workers in the study population had non-zero employment earnings, many of them reported an activity other than working as their main activity for the year, a key factor in explaining their low-earnings situation. Other factors associated with having a college or university education while also having low employment earnings include being self-employed, working in certain occupations or industries and being female.

    Release date: 2010-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201000111102
    Description:

    For many Canadians, the first point of contact for medical care is their doctor. Not having a regular medical doctor is associated with fewer visits with general practitioners or specialists, who can play a role in screening and treating medical conditions early. Over the past decade, the percentage of Canadians who report having a regular medical doctor has declined.

    Release date: 2010-04-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-641-X
    Description:

    This report concerns French-language immigration outside Quebec and its recent evolution, focusing on its numbers, its geographic distribution and its demographic and social characteristics. This statistical portrait will mainly use the concept of first official language spoken (FOLS), which is now widely used as a criterion for a person's linguistic identity in studies on official language minorities. The Francophone immigrant population outside Quebec is comprised of two groups: those who have only French as their first official language spoken (French FOLS immigrants) and those who have both French and English (French-English FOLS immigrants).

    The Francophone immigrant population living outside Quebec is fairly small, both in absolute numbers and in relation to either the French-speaking population or the immigrant population as a whole. However, the relative weight of Francophone immigrants within the French-speaking population has increased, going from 6.2% to 10% between 1991 and 2006, while their weight within the overall immigrant population has varied more moderately, and in 2006 it was, at most, less than 2%.

    The majority of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec 70% are concentrated in Ontario. Furthermore, two-thirds of French-speaking immigrants live in three metropolitan areas: Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In Canada outside Quebec, French-English FOLS immigrants, numbering 76,100 in the 2006 Census, are slightly more numerous than French FOLS immigrants, who number 60,900. In some cities, especially Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary, this characteristic is more prevalent, with French-English FOLS immigrants outnumbering their French FOLS counterparts by almost two to one. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these two FOLS groups are sometimes quite different.

    International immigration to Canada has undergone a rapid transformation in recent decades. Immigrants of European origin have tended to give way to immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this regard, French FOLS immigrants stand out from other immigrants in that a large proportion of them come from Africa. One of the consequences of this trend has been to change the composition of the French FOLS immigrant population; in 2006, Blacks made up 26% of that population, compared to 5% of the other two immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010213244
    Description:

    This study focuses on university graduates whose studies would normally lead to employment in a regulated occupation such as medicine, law or education. It uses the 2006 Census to compute the proportion or match rates'of such graduates working in the occupations for which they studied. The match rates for immigrants are then compared to similar groups of the Canadian-born. The study also compares the types of jobs held by immigrants and the Canadian-born not working in occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2010-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010322
    Description:

    In this paper, the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) is used to examine how immigrants in the 2000-2001 landing cohort subjectively assess their life in Canada. The paper provides a useful complement to other studies of immigrant outcomes that often focus on employment, income or health. Four years after landing, about three-quarters of LSIC respondents said they were satisfied or very satisfied with their life in Canada, and a comparable proportion said their expectations of life in Canada had been met or exceeded. Nearly 9 out of 10 said that, if given the chance, they would make the same decision again to come to Canada. A broad range of demographic, social and economic characteristics are associated with subjective assessments. Positive assessments of life in Canada are less prevalent among individuals in their thirties and forties, and university graduates and principal applicants in the skilled worker admission category, than they are among other groups. While assessments of life in Canada are correlated with economic factors such as personal income, they are also correlated with social factors such as relationships with neighbours and perceptions of discrimination.

    Release date: 2010-02-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-229-X
    Description:

    This report examines the health of Canadians by focusing on demography, health status, health behaviours, and the environment. The aging of the population provides a context for the report. Measures that reflect physical, mental and social well-being are presented, followed by indicators of positive and negative behaviours that are known to influence health status. Finally, indicators of the social and physical environments in which we live and work are examined. Together, these Health Indicators highlight the health of Canadians at a national and provincial/territorial level. They provide benchmarks for comparisons over time and place, from regional to international levels.

    This report celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Health Indicators project. Since 1999, Statistics Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information have collaborated on developing and providing a broad range of indicators for health regions across Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-11

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

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