Statistics by subject – Ethnic diversity and immigration

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All (16)

All (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014364
    Description:

    During the 1980s and 1990s, immigration was associated with the rise in low-income rates and family-income inequality in Canada. Over the 2000s, there were significant changes in the labour market and in immigrant selection. This paper focuses on the direct effect of immigration on the change in low income and family-income inequality over the 1995-to-2010 period. The paper outlines recent trends in low-income rates and income inequality for both the Canadian-born and immigrants. The low-income rate in Canada fell during the 2000s. Was this driven in part by changes in economic outcomes among immigrants? Inequality increased considerably in the late 1990s. Did immigration contribute to this increase?

    Release date: 2014-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014363
    Description:

    Studies of immigrant well-being primarily focus on economic outcomes. However, immigrants often cite a desire to improve their general quality of life as their main motivation for migrating. This study compares life satisfaction among recent immigrants in Canada with life satisfaction in their country of origin and with the Canadian-born population, and provides an evaluation of the role that national-level economic and social factors play in immigrants’ life satisfaction.

    Release date: 2014-12-10

  • Public use microdata: 99M0002X
    Description:

    This hierarchical PUMF product provides access to non-aggregated data covering a sample of 1% of the Canadian households. It is a comprehensive social, demographic and economic database about Canada and its people, and contains a wealth of characteristics on the population. The file enables the study of individuals in relation to their census families, economic families and households. The geographic identifiers have been restricted to the provinces, the three territories grouped into a region called Northern Canada and selected metropolitan areas (Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver, Edmonton and Calgary) to ensure respondents’ anonymity. This comprehensive tool is excellent for policy analysts, pollsters, social researchers and anyone interested in modeling and performing statistical regression analysis using 2011 National Household Survey data.

    The Individuals File was released on July 29, 2014 and the Hierarchical File is available as of today, December 9, 2014.

    This product, available in DVD-ROM format, contains a data file in American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format as well as user documentation. It contains SAS, SPSS and Stata program source codes to enable users to read the set of records. Note: Users will require knowledge of data manipulation and retrieval software such as SAS, SPSS or Stata to be able to use this product.

    Release date: 2014-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401014099
    Description:

    This study uses the linked 2006 Census-Hospital Discharge Abstract Database to examine hospitalization during the 2004-to-2006 period, by immigrant status of Ontario seniors.

    Release date: 2014-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2014001
    Description:

    Migratory and natural increase to population growth in Canada from 1851 to 2061 have a changing contribution.Migratory increase plays an increasing role in Canada’s population growth.

    Release date: 2014-10-09

  • Public use microdata: 99M0001X
    Description:

    The Individuals File, 2011 National Household Survey (Public Use Microdata Files) provides data on the characteristics of the Canadian population. The file contains a 2.7% sample of anonymous responses to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses and geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and metropolitan areas. With 133 variables, this comprehensive tool is excellent for policy analysts, pollsters, social researchers and anyone interested in modelling and performing statistical regression analysis using National Household Survey data.

    Microdata files uniquely provide users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other NHS products can be created or relationships between variables can be analyzed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    This product, offered on DVD-ROM, contains the data file (in ASCII format); user documentation and supporting information; all licence agreements; and SAS, SPSS and Stata program source codes to enable users to read the set of records. It is important to note that users will require knowledge of data manipulation packages (or software) such as SAS, SPSS or Stata to use this product.

    Release date: 2014-07-29

  • Table: 99-010-X
    Description:

    This topic presents data on immigration, citizenship and place of birth, ethnic ancestry and the visible minority population, religion, and languages spoken in Canada. Information is provided on Canada's immigrant or foreign-born population: its size, its geographic distribution, its origins and its demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for the Canadian-born population and for non-permanent residents. Data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) are available for various levels of geography.

    Analytical products

    The analytical document provides analysis on the key findings and trends in the data, and is complimented with the short articles found in NHS in Brief and the NHS Focus on Geography Series.

    Data products

    The NHS Profile is one data product that provides a statistical overview of user selected geographic areas based on several detailed variables and/or groups of variables. Other data products include data tables which represent a series of cross tabulations ranging in complexity and are available for various levels of geography.

    Release date: 2014-06-17

  • Table: 99-010-X2011003
    Description:

    These three short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Generation status: Canadian-born children of immigrants, the second, Obtaining Canadian citizenship and the third, Mixed unions in Canada.

    Release date: 2014-06-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-06-17

  • Table: 99-010-X201100314034
    Description:

    These three short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Generation status: Canadian-born children of immigrants, the second, Obtaining Canadian citizenship and the third, Mixed unions in Canada.

    Release date: 2014-06-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014361
    Description:

    In Canada, the selection of economic immigrants throughout the 1990s and 2000s was based largely on the human capital model of immigration. This model posits that selecting immigrants with high levels of human capital is particularly advantageous in the long run. It is argued that higher educational levels allow immigrants to both bring the skills needed in a "knowledge-based economy" and, perhaps more importantly, better adjust to both cyclical and structural changes in the labour market than immigrants with lower educational levels.

    This paper examines the trends in the earnings advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over less educated immigrants by immigration class. The focus is on three questions. First, did the well-documented decline in entry earnings observed over the last quarter-century vary by immigrant educational level and by admission class? Second, have there been significant shifts across recent cohorts in the economic advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over their less educated counterparts, both at entry and in the longer run? Third, and most importantly, does the relative earnings advantage of more highly educated immigrants change with time spent in Canada, that is, in the longer run?

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Table: 99-014-X2011020
    Description:

    Using 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) data, this profile provides a statistical overview of variables describing immigration and ethnocultural diversity, Aboriginal peoples, education, labour, mobility and migration, income and earnings, and housing and shelter costs.

    In the National Household Survey product line, groups of related variables are referred to as 'release components of profiles.' These are made available with the major releases of variables of the NHS cycle, starting with the Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity, and Aboriginal Peoples releases. Together, they will form a complete NHS Profile of all the variables for each level of geography. Profile-component data are available at the Canada, province and territory, census division and census subdivision levels, at the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration levels, census tract level, and at the federal electoral district (based on the 2013 Representation Order) level.

    Release date: 2014-05-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014356
    Description:

    The annual level of immigration is one of the most critical components of a country's immigration policy. It is difficult to directly compare the costs and benefits of changing immigration levels because immigration can serve multiple goals. However, some narrowly-defined effects can be empirically assessed. This study considers solely the potential influence of immigration levels on immigrant entry earnings.

    This study focuses on the effect of immigration levels on one aspect of immigrants' labour market outcomes their entry earnings, i.e., earnings during the first two full years in Canada. An increase in labour supply - that is, a larger immigrant entering cohort - could increase competition for the types of jobs sought by entering immigrants and place downward pressure on wages for immigrants arriving in that cohort.

    Release date: 2014-02-13

Data (6)

Data (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Public use microdata: 99M0002X
    Description:

    This hierarchical PUMF product provides access to non-aggregated data covering a sample of 1% of the Canadian households. It is a comprehensive social, demographic and economic database about Canada and its people, and contains a wealth of characteristics on the population. The file enables the study of individuals in relation to their census families, economic families and households. The geographic identifiers have been restricted to the provinces, the three territories grouped into a region called Northern Canada and selected metropolitan areas (Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver, Edmonton and Calgary) to ensure respondents’ anonymity. This comprehensive tool is excellent for policy analysts, pollsters, social researchers and anyone interested in modeling and performing statistical regression analysis using 2011 National Household Survey data.

    The Individuals File was released on July 29, 2014 and the Hierarchical File is available as of today, December 9, 2014.

    This product, available in DVD-ROM format, contains a data file in American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format as well as user documentation. It contains SAS, SPSS and Stata program source codes to enable users to read the set of records. Note: Users will require knowledge of data manipulation and retrieval software such as SAS, SPSS or Stata to be able to use this product.

    Release date: 2014-12-09

  • Public use microdata: 99M0001X
    Description:

    The Individuals File, 2011 National Household Survey (Public Use Microdata Files) provides data on the characteristics of the Canadian population. The file contains a 2.7% sample of anonymous responses to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses and geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and metropolitan areas. With 133 variables, this comprehensive tool is excellent for policy analysts, pollsters, social researchers and anyone interested in modelling and performing statistical regression analysis using National Household Survey data.

    Microdata files uniquely provide users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other NHS products can be created or relationships between variables can be analyzed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    This product, offered on DVD-ROM, contains the data file (in ASCII format); user documentation and supporting information; all licence agreements; and SAS, SPSS and Stata program source codes to enable users to read the set of records. It is important to note that users will require knowledge of data manipulation packages (or software) such as SAS, SPSS or Stata to use this product.

    Release date: 2014-07-29

  • Table: 99-010-X
    Description:

    This topic presents data on immigration, citizenship and place of birth, ethnic ancestry and the visible minority population, religion, and languages spoken in Canada. Information is provided on Canada's immigrant or foreign-born population: its size, its geographic distribution, its origins and its demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for the Canadian-born population and for non-permanent residents. Data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) are available for various levels of geography.

    Analytical products

    The analytical document provides analysis on the key findings and trends in the data, and is complimented with the short articles found in NHS in Brief and the NHS Focus on Geography Series.

    Data products

    The NHS Profile is one data product that provides a statistical overview of user selected geographic areas based on several detailed variables and/or groups of variables. Other data products include data tables which represent a series of cross tabulations ranging in complexity and are available for various levels of geography.

    Release date: 2014-06-17

  • Table: 99-010-X2011003
    Description:

    These three short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Generation status: Canadian-born children of immigrants, the second, Obtaining Canadian citizenship and the third, Mixed unions in Canada.

    Release date: 2014-06-17

  • Table: 99-010-X201100314034
    Description:

    These three short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Generation status: Canadian-born children of immigrants, the second, Obtaining Canadian citizenship and the third, Mixed unions in Canada.

    Release date: 2014-06-17

  • Table: 99-014-X2011020
    Description:

    Using 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) data, this profile provides a statistical overview of variables describing immigration and ethnocultural diversity, Aboriginal peoples, education, labour, mobility and migration, income and earnings, and housing and shelter costs.

    In the National Household Survey product line, groups of related variables are referred to as 'release components of profiles.' These are made available with the major releases of variables of the NHS cycle, starting with the Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity, and Aboriginal Peoples releases. Together, they will form a complete NHS Profile of all the variables for each level of geography. Profile-component data are available at the Canada, province and territory, census division and census subdivision levels, at the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration levels, census tract level, and at the federal electoral district (based on the 2013 Representation Order) level.

    Release date: 2014-05-21

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014364
    Description:

    During the 1980s and 1990s, immigration was associated with the rise in low-income rates and family-income inequality in Canada. Over the 2000s, there were significant changes in the labour market and in immigrant selection. This paper focuses on the direct effect of immigration on the change in low income and family-income inequality over the 1995-to-2010 period. The paper outlines recent trends in low-income rates and income inequality for both the Canadian-born and immigrants. The low-income rate in Canada fell during the 2000s. Was this driven in part by changes in economic outcomes among immigrants? Inequality increased considerably in the late 1990s. Did immigration contribute to this increase?

    Release date: 2014-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014363
    Description:

    Studies of immigrant well-being primarily focus on economic outcomes. However, immigrants often cite a desire to improve their general quality of life as their main motivation for migrating. This study compares life satisfaction among recent immigrants in Canada with life satisfaction in their country of origin and with the Canadian-born population, and provides an evaluation of the role that national-level economic and social factors play in immigrants’ life satisfaction.

    Release date: 2014-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401014099
    Description:

    This study uses the linked 2006 Census-Hospital Discharge Abstract Database to examine hospitalization during the 2004-to-2006 period, by immigrant status of Ontario seniors.

    Release date: 2014-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2014001
    Description:

    Migratory and natural increase to population growth in Canada from 1851 to 2061 have a changing contribution.Migratory increase plays an increasing role in Canada’s population growth.

    Release date: 2014-10-09

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-06-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014361
    Description:

    In Canada, the selection of economic immigrants throughout the 1990s and 2000s was based largely on the human capital model of immigration. This model posits that selecting immigrants with high levels of human capital is particularly advantageous in the long run. It is argued that higher educational levels allow immigrants to both bring the skills needed in a "knowledge-based economy" and, perhaps more importantly, better adjust to both cyclical and structural changes in the labour market than immigrants with lower educational levels.

    This paper examines the trends in the earnings advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over less educated immigrants by immigration class. The focus is on three questions. First, did the well-documented decline in entry earnings observed over the last quarter-century vary by immigrant educational level and by admission class? Second, have there been significant shifts across recent cohorts in the economic advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over their less educated counterparts, both at entry and in the longer run? Third, and most importantly, does the relative earnings advantage of more highly educated immigrants change with time spent in Canada, that is, in the longer run?

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014356
    Description:

    The annual level of immigration is one of the most critical components of a country's immigration policy. It is difficult to directly compare the costs and benefits of changing immigration levels because immigration can serve multiple goals. However, some narrowly-defined effects can be empirically assessed. This study considers solely the potential influence of immigration levels on immigrant entry earnings.

    This study focuses on the effect of immigration levels on one aspect of immigrants' labour market outcomes their entry earnings, i.e., earnings during the first two full years in Canada. An increase in labour supply - that is, a larger immigrant entering cohort - could increase competition for the types of jobs sought by entering immigrants and place downward pressure on wages for immigrants arriving in that cohort.

    Release date: 2014-02-13

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