Statistics by subject – Divorce and separation

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  • Journals and periodicals: 89-652-X
    Description:

    This publication presents key highlights and results from the General Social Survey on the topics of caregiving and care receiving; social identity; giving, volunteering and participating; victimization; time use; and family.

    Release date: 2017-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400114031
    Description:

    This Juristat article profiles cases enrolled with a Maintenance Enforcement Program (MEP) and examines the characteristics of the cases with regard to the age group of the child beneficiaries. Using data from the Survey of Maintenance Enforcement Programs, it focuses on differences between child support cases involving younger children and those involving older children, the support amounts due and received and the proportion of cases sent out of province. The article also analyzes a cohort of enrolled cases involving children aged 17 and 18 over a five-year period.

    Release date: 2014-06-23

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014001
    Description:

    The article examines parenting and child support after separation or divorce, looking at those who have separated or divorced within the last 20 years. Included is a national and regional overview of separated or divorced parents, as well as an examination of parenting decisions in the wake of a marital or common-law breakup (child residency, time-sharing, and decision-making) and financial support arrangements for the child.

    Release date: 2014-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201300111788
    Description:

    This article analyses patterns related to marital status and nuptiality in Canada. Data on marital and conjugal status come primarily from the 2011 Census of Population, with comparisons to historical data where appropriate, particularly 1981. In addition, data from the Canadian Vital Statistics Database on marriage and divorce are also analysed, with an emphasis on recent trends.

    Release date: 2013-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111634
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines some of the key aspects associated with divorce cases in civil court, including the caseload and types of court activity associated with divorce cases, as well as the length of time taken to process and reach a divorce judgment in these cases. The article presents information from the Civil Court Survey for seven provinces and territories: Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

    Release date: 2012-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111423
    Description:

    Using information from the Civil Court Survey, the article focuses on family law cases involving child custody, access and support arrangements in seven provinces and territories: Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. It examines some of the key aspects associated with these cases, including the types of court activity as well as the length of time taken to process and reach decisions in such cases.

    Release date: 2011-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111158
    Description:

    This article explores the processing of divorce cases in civil courts in seven provinces and territories: Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Using information from the Civil Court Survey, the article examines some of the key aspects associated with divorce cases, including the volume of cases, the types of court activity associated with the cases, and the length of time taken to process and reach decisions in these cases. Issues identified in these divorce cases, such as access, custody, property and support, are also examined.

    Release date: 2010-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110659
    Description:

    About 40 years ago, marriage was very popular: most children were born to, and grew up with, married parents. That has changed. Divorce has risen sharply, common-law unions have become more and more popular, and many children are born outside of marriage. Others, at a young age, see their parents divorce.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019198
    Description:

    This article uses the General Social Survey on family history to briefly examine the basic characteristics of Canadians who have legally married once, twice or more than twice. It then uses a proportional hazard model to identify some of the factors that are associated with ending a first and a second marriage by divorce or separation.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025819
    Description:

    This article examines whether adults who experienced change in their parental structure regard their childhood as happy and if they were less close to their parents than children whose families remained intact.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999135
    Description:

    Two quasi-experiments are used to estimate the impact of parental divorce on the adult incomes and labour market behaviour of adolescents, as well as on their use of social programs, and their marital/fertility behaviour. These involve the use of individuals experiencing the death of a parent, and legislative changes to the Canadian divorce law in 1986. Parental loss by death is assumed to be exogenous; the experiences of children with a bereaved background offering a benchmark to assess the endogeneity of parental loss through divorce. Differences between individuals with divorced parents and those from intact and bereaved families significantly overstate the impact of divorce across a broad range of outcomes. When background characteristics are controlled for-most notably the income and labour market activity of parents in the years leading up to the divorce-parental divorce seems to influence the marital and fertility decisions of children, but not their labour market outcomes. Adolescents whose parents divorced tend to put off marriage, and once married suffer a greater likelihood of marital instability, but their earnings and incomes are not on average much different from others.

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999132
    Description:

    Child poverty is high on the government's agenda. In order to reduce the rate of low-income among children, one has to either reduce the number of children flowing into low-income, or increase the number flowing out. But what is behind such movement? Most analysts would immediately think of job loss among the parents, but obviously divorce and remarriage can also play a role. In order to favourably alter the flows, one has to have some understanding of what is driving them. This paper asks to what extent this movement of children is determined by (1) changes in family status of the parents of children, or (2) changes in the parent's labour market conditions (i.e. job loss and gain, changes in hours of work or wages). We find that for an individual child, a divorce or marriage can have a tremendous influence on the likelihood of entering or exiting low-income. At the level of the individual, changes in family composition (when they occur) are more important than changes in jobs held by parents. However, changes in family status are relatively infrequent compared to labour market changes. Parents are much more likely to lose or find jobs, and experience changes in hours worked or wages, than they are to marry or divorce. When this is accounted for we find that, in the aggregate, flows of children into and out of low income are associated roughly equally with family compositional changes and changes in wages and hours worked.

    Release date: 1999-04-21

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