Statistics by subject – Family history

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All (90) (25 of 90 results)

  • Table: Summary table
    Release date: 2017-07-12

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211536
    Description:

    Young adults with one or two parents who are university-educated are much more likely to have a degree themselves than those whose parents are less well-educated. This article determines whether intergenerational mobility in university education is increasing. Specifically, whether people whose parents did not complete university are themselves more likely to have finished university than nearly 25 years ago is examined, as is whether the gap between them and people whose parents completed university has narrowed over time.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211060
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211062
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211061
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-599-M
    Description:

    This research paper series addresses many topics related to children and youth in Canada, including: cognitive, physical and emotional development; health; behaviour; relationships with others; experiences in the home, at school and at work; family change; and transitions to adulthood. The main data source for the papers in this series is the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Public use microdata: 12M0021X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for the 21st cycle (2007) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey. Cycle 21 of the GSS collected data from persons aged 45 years and over living in private households in the 10 provinces of Canada. The survey covered a wide range of topics such as well-being, family composition, retirement decisions and plans, care giving and care receiving experiences, social networks and housing.

    Release date: 2009-05-04

  • Table: 89-633-X
    Description:

    Cycle 21 of the 2007 General Social Survey (GSS) was on "Family, Social Support and Retirement". Data were collected over a 9 month period from March to December 2007 with a sample of approximately 25,000 respondents representing the non-institutionalized population in the 10 provinces. These tables contain data on the prevalence of care given and received by seniors because of long-term health problems, selected employment consequences of providing care to seniors and self-rated stress experienced by caregivers. All tables are available by sex and age groups, and for Canada and the provinces or regions.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

  • Table: 94-581-X2006006
    Description:

    Using 2006 Census data, this profile provides a statistical overview of the income and earnings, and housing and shelter costs variables, as well as all other variables that have already been released, for census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and census subdivisions.

    In the census product line, groups of variables, such as this one, are referred to as release components of profiles. These are made available with the major releases of variables of the census cycle, starting with age and sex. Together, they will form a complete cumulative profile of all the variables for each level of geography, plus one cumulative profile for the dissolved census subdivisions.

    Starting with the age and sex major day of release, and on major days of release thereafter, profile component data will be available for particular topics at the Canada, province and territory, census division and census subdivision levels, at the census metropolitan area, census agglomeration and census tract levels, and at the federal electoral district (based on the 2003 Representation Order) level. Profile component data for all other standard areas, including dissemination areas, urban areas, designated places and forward sortation areas, will be available approximately four weeks after the major days of release.

    Release date: 2008-05-29

  • Public use microdata: 12M0020X
    Description:

    Cycle 20 of the General Social Survey (GSS) is the fourth cycle to collect detailed information on family life in Canada. The previous GSS cycles that collected family data were Cycles 5, 10 and 15. Topics include demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and marital status; family origin of parents; departure from the parental home; marriages of respondent; common-law unions of respondent; fertility and family intentions; birth and adoption; child custody; financial support agreement or arrangement for children and ex-spouse/partner; social networks; work-family balance and family functioning; work history and maternity and paternity leave. The GSS also gathered data on the respondent's main activity and other socio-demographic characteristics. The target population for Cycle 20 of the GSS is all persons 15 years of age and older in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and full-time residents of institutions.

    Release date: 2008-03-27

  • Table: 94-579-X2006005
    Description:

    Using 2006 Census data, this profile provides a statistical overview of the labour market activity, industry, occupation, education, language of work, place of work and mode of transportation variables for census metropolitan areas, tracted census agglomerations and census tracts.

    In the census product line, groups of variables, such as this one, are referred to as release components of profiles. These are made available with the major releases of variables of the census cycle, starting with age and sex. Together, they will form a complete cumulative profile of all the variables for each level of geography, plus one cumulative profile for the dissolved census subdivisions.

    Starting with the age and sex major day of release, and on major days of release thereafter, profile component data will be available for particular topics at the Canada, province and territory, census division and census subdivision levels, at the census metropolitan area, census agglomeration and census tract levels, and at the federal electoral district (based on the 2003 Representation Order) level. Profile component data for all other standard areas, including dissemination areas, urban areas, designated places and forward sortation areas, will be available approximately four weeks after the major days of release.

    Release date: 2008-03-04

  • Table: 97-553-X2006006
    Description:

    Data for census metropolitan areas, tracted census agglomerations and census tracts are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Families and households,' which presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone.

    Family structure refers to the classification of census families into families of married couples, common-law couples (including same-sex couples), and lone-parent families.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2008-02-19

  • Table: 97-553-X2006008
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories and forward sortation areas are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Families and households,' which presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone.

    Family structure refers to the classification of census families into families of married couples, common-law couples (including same-sex couples), and lone-parent families.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2008-02-19

  • Index and guides: 97-553-G2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topic: Family variables.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts, data quality and historical comparability. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2007-10-31

  • Table: 97-553-X2006007
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Families and households,' which presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone.

    Family structure refers to the classification of census families into families of married couples, common-law couples (including same-sex couples), and lone-parent families.

    This table can be found in topic bundle: Families and Households, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-553-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-553-XWE2006007.

    Release date: 2007-09-12

  • Table: 97-553-X2006009
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Families and households,' which presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone.

    Family structure refers to the classification of census families into families of married couples, common-law couples (including same-sex couples), and lone-parent families.

    This table can be found in topic bundle: Families and Households, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-553-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-553-XWE2006009.

    Release date: 2007-09-12

  • Table: 97-553-X2006025
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces and territories are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Families and households,' which presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone.

    Family structure refers to the classification of census families into families of married couples, common-law couples (including same-sex couples), and lone-parent families.

    This table can be found in topic bundle: Families and Households, 2006 Census, Catalogue no. 97-553-XCB2006004.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    This table is available free on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97-553-XWE2006025.

    Release date: 2007-09-12

  • Table: 89-625-X
    Description:

    Cycle 20 of the General Social Survey (GSS) is the fourth cycle to collect detailed information on family life in Canada. The previous GSS cycles that collected family data were Cycles 5, 10 and 15. Topics include demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and marital status; family origin of parents; departure from the parental home; marriages of respondent; common-law unions of respondent; fertility and family intentions; birth and adoption; child custody; financial support agreement or arrangement for children and ex-spouse/partner; social networks; work-family balance and family functioning; work history and maternity and paternity leave. The GSS also gathered data on the respondent's main activity and other socio-demographic characteristics. The target population for Cycle 20 of the GSS is all persons 15 years of age and older in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and full-time residents of institutions.

    Release date: 2007-08-23

  • Table: 89-625-X2007001
    Description:

    Cycle 20 of the General Social Survey (GSS) conducted from June to October 2006, collected detailed information from 23,608 persons aged 15 and older and living in a private household in one of 10 Canadian provinces. The survey focused on information about the respondent's family. This publication presents data on the number of families by family structure by Regions.

    Release date: 2007-08-23

Data (33)

Data (33) (25 of 33 results)

Analysis (49)

Analysis (49) (25 of 49 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211536
    Description:

    Young adults with one or two parents who are university-educated are much more likely to have a degree themselves than those whose parents are less well-educated. This article determines whether intergenerational mobility in university education is increasing. Specifically, whether people whose parents did not complete university are themselves more likely to have finished university than nearly 25 years ago is examined, as is whether the gap between them and people whose parents completed university has narrowed over time.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211060
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211062
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211061
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-599-M
    Description:

    This research paper series addresses many topics related to children and youth in Canada, including: cognitive, physical and emotional development; health; behaviour; relationships with others; experiences in the home, at school and at work; family change; and transitions to adulthood. The main data source for the papers in this series is the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-001-X
    Description:

    Update on family and labour studies is the newsletter of the Family and Labour Studies Division, a research arm of Statistics Canada devoted to analysis of the well-being of children and families and to how they interact with the labour market and social programs.

    Release date: 2007-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060039480
    Description:

    This paper examine patterns in adult children returning to the family home across the last few decades, the reasons for coming back, and the socio-demographic and economic factors that influence this process.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005272
    Description:

    This paper makes use of matched tax-return data for daughters, their parents, their partners and their partners' parents to investigate the interactions between intergenerational mobility and marital matching for young couples in Canada. We show how assortative mating contributes to intergenerational household income persistence. The strength of the association between sons-in-law's income and women's parental income means that the intergenerational link between household incomes is stronger than that found for daughters' own incomes alone. This is also the case when viewed from the other side, so that daughters' and their partners' earnings are related to partners' parental income. These results indicate that assortative matching magnifies individual-level intergenerational persistence.

    In the second part of the paper we consider assortative mating by parental income. We find that daughter's parental income has an elasticity of almost 0.2 with respect to her partner's parental income. This association is of approximately the same magnitude as the intergenerational link between parents' and children's incomes. We investigate variations in the correlation between the parental incomes across several measured dimensions; cohabiting couples have lower correlations, as do those who form partnerships early, those who live in rural areas and most interestingly, those who later divorce. We interpret this last result as evidence that, on average, couples with parental incomes that are more similar enjoy a more stable match.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005267
    Description:

    We analyze the intergenerational income mobility of Canadians born to immigrants using the 2001 Census. A detailed portrait of the Canadian population is offered as are estimates of the degree of generational mobility among the children of immigrants from 70 countries. The degree of persistence as estimated in regression to the mean models is about the same for immigrants as for the entire population, and there is more generational mobility among immigrants in Canada than in the United States. We also use quantile regressions to distinguish between the role of social capital from other constraints limiting mobility and find that these are present and associated with father's education.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005261
    Description:

    The upbringing of children is modeled as a modified principal agent problem in which children attempt to maximize their own well-being when faced with a parenting strategy chosen by the parent, to maximize parent's perception of family well-being. Thus, children as well as parents are players, but children have higher discount rates than parents. The simultaneity of parenting and child behaviour is confirmed using the 1994 Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children.

    Release date: 2005-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005247
    Description:

    This study undertakes three comparisons using Cycle 2 (1996-97) data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) in Canada. First, the study compares the health outcomes of children of the Native-born Canadian (NBC) group with those of the immigrant group in general. Differences are also investigated within the three immigrant sub-groups: the American immigrant group, the European immigrant group and Asian immigrant group. Second, this study tests the hypothesis that the children of any immigrant group in Canada would have a higher level of health outcomes for the same level of resources. Third, the study examines the association of time of residency of immigrants in different groups and the health outcomes of their children. An immigrant family is defined as one in which at least one of the parents is foreign-born. Health outcomes are measured by the PMK's (person most knowledgeable about the child) assessment of the child's health. Ordered logit models are employed for estimation. The children selected for analysis are 4 to 13 years of age.

    The NLSCY data suggest that the health outcomes of children in the immigrant families in general are similar to that in the NBC group. However, the health outcomes of the Asian immigrant group are slightly lower and those of the American immigrant group are markedly better. Except for the American immigrant group, there is evidence that the children of any other immigrant group would have lower health status for the same level of resources. Decomposition results indicate that a higher level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for markedly better outcomes for the American immigrant group; while a lower level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for the lower level of outcomes for the Asian immigrant group. On the other hand, health outcomes are higher for the European immigrant group than for the NBC group when variation in resources is considered, while lower when variation in productivity coefficients is examined. Finally, there is statistical evidence that the health status of children of immigrant families would improve with the time of residency of immigrant parents, if it were lower initially. The findings of the study indicate that present health outcomes of children in the immigrant families, on average, are not a great concern. However, those of the Asian immigrant group may be a concern.

    Release date: 2005-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005244
    Description:

    This comparative study investigates the role of family background characteristics in postsecondary access in Canada and the United States. Given that postsecondary schooling is funded very differently in the two countries, family background may play substantively different roles. The findings suggest that university-going is less common among lower-income students and members of a visible minority group in the U.S. than among their Canadian counterparts. Some possible reasons are discussed.

    Release date: 2005-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2005002
    Description:

    This study examines links between changes in relationships with parents and peers during adolescence and adolescent depressive symptoms. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this study provides insight into: the relationships between youth and their mothers, fathers and friends; how these relationships changed over a two-year period; and how these changes related to depressive symptoms experienced by youth at ages 16 and 17.

    Release date: 2005-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005237
    Description:

    This research finds that family background (parental education level, family type, ethnicity, location) has important direct and indirect effects on post-secondary participation. The indirect effects of background operate through a set of intermediate variables representing high school outcomes and related attitudes and behaviours. Overall, the large fraction of the family background effect that operates through indirect channels indicates that the period of life before post-secondary financing and related issues become important is crucial for equitable and efficient post-secondary access. These results are based on two sex-specific measures of access (Any Post-secondary, and University) obtained from Statistics Canada's School Leavers and Follow-Up Surveys.

    Release date: 2005-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2004001
    Description:

    This study examines links between harsh, punitive parenting and aggressive child behaviour, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. Children were studied of both sexes aged 2 to 3 years and 8 to 9 years, from various regions of Canada and from a range of income groups.

    Release date: 2004-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004226
    Description:

    This paper presents new evidence on the relationships between access to postsecondary education and family background. It uses the School Leavers Survey (SLS) and the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to analyse participation rates in 1991 and 2000.

    Release date: 2004-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004221
    Description:

    This study examines the expansion of visible minority neighbourhoods in Canada's three largest metropolitan areas from 1981 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-07-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004223
    Description:

    This study examines retirement issues for older working Canadians: income, pension coverage, home ownership status, immigration status, marital status and self-assessed health. It uses data from the 2002 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2004-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410213113
    Description:

    Why are so many seniors still at work? Some enjoy their job and intend on working indefinitely, while others feel forced to work for economic reasons. The 2001 Census is used to update an earlier study focussing on the occupations of seniors who continue to work beyond the age of 65, the traditional age of retirement.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036619
    Description:

    This article examines the characteristics of grandparents in Canada, with a focus on those who share homes with their grandchildren.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311013102
    Description:

    This article examines the changes to family wealth during the economic boom of 1984 to 1999. In the absence of longitudinal data, changes in family wealth can be estimated using cohorts of 'similar' families from two points in time.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003207
    Description:

    The estimation of intergenerational earnings mobility is rife with measurement problems since the research does not observe permanent, lifetime earnings. Nearly all studies make corrections for mean variation in earnings because of the age differences among respondents. Recent works employ average earnings or instrumental variable methods to address the effects of measurement error as a result of transitory earnings shocks and mis-reporting. However, empirical studies of intergenerational mobility have paid no attention to the changes in earnings variance across the life cycle suggested by economic models of human capital investment.

    Using information from the Intergenerational Income Data from Canada and the National Longitudinal Survey and Panel Study of Income Dynamics from the United States, this study finds a strong association between age at observation and estimated earnings persistence. Part of this age-dependence is related to a general increase in transitory earnings variance during the collection of data. An independent effect of life cycle investment is also identified. These findings are then applied to the variation among intergenerational earnings persistence studies. Among studies with similar methodologies, one-third of the variance in published estimates of earnings persistence is attributable to cross-study differences in the age of responding fathers. Finally, these results call into question tests for the importance of credit constraints based on measures of earnings at different points in the life cycle.

    Release date: 2003-08-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-585-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    Using the PALS data, this article describes the lives of children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.

    Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to formal and informal help;-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and-household income.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010046117
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors that contribute to frequent contact between adult children aged 25 to 54 and their parents.

    Release date: 2002-03-11

Reference (8)

Reference (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Index and guides: 97-553-G2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topic: Family variables.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts, data quality and historical comparability. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2007-10-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0078X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is the first Canada-wide survey of children. Starting in 1994, it will gather information on a sample of children and their life experiences. It will follow these children over time. The survey will collect information on children and their families, education, health, development, behaviour, friends, activities, etc. This document describes the survey instruments of cycle 4.

    Release date: 2004-07-02

  • Index and guides: 92-381-X
    Description:

    This report presents the concepts relating to census families and economic families. It discusses the changes made to the definition of the census family for 2001, and how historical comparability is affected. The report also describes aspects of data collection and processing that could have an impact on the quality of the variable Relationship to Person 1, and how this variable, along with the related demographic variables - sex, age, marital status and common-law status - is processed to ensure consistency and to produce derived variables at the family level.

    Release date: 2003-11-25

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015844
    Description:

    The at-risk child is defined by the author as a "child whose personal characteristics or environmental characteristics" indicate "at a very early age, a strong probability of psychopathologic development." Therefore, in the second section of the paper, the author focussed on intervention strategies for vulnerable children. The third section of the paper summarized resilience and its construct. The fourth section of the paper focussed on risk factors and protection factors. The author concluded his presentation and his paper by asserting that resiliency studies are very complex owing to the multiple interaction between the various environmental factors.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015837
    Description:

    Allen Zeesman shared findings from the National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth (NLSCY) and the Understanding the Early Years survey (UEY).

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015848
    Description:

    The authors began by noting that the concept of the "adolescent mother" encompasses a multitude of factors and indicators, which include the rates of fertility (birth rates) and pregnancy.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1996011
    Description:

    This paper looks at the family data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). It also provides an explanation of the approach used in the SLID to convey changes in the family as well as examples to indicate how family data can be analysed longitudinally.

    Release date: 1997-12-31

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1995013
    Description:

    This paper describes the empirical data that will be available from Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) to help explain the choices women make in balancing home, family and work aspects of their lives.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

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