Statistics by subject – Household characteristics

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  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017078
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series highlights new data on the ownership of residential properties in Toronto and Vancouver by non-residents of Canada. It reports on the prevalence of non-resident ownership for different types of housing, including single-detached houses, semi-detached houses, row houses and condominium-apartments, and compares the property values of non-resident and resident-owned assets. Information on the location, age and size of condominium-apartments is used to assess differences in the value of non-resident owned properties.

    Release date: 2017-12-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-13

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-18

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-07-26

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 16-508-X2017001
    Description:

    This fact sheet looks at the treatment of drinking water by Canadian households. This publication covers some water treatment techniques, the reasons provided by households to explain their behavior, and various characteristics of households that have a link with their tendency to treat water.

    Release date: 2017-05-01

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2015008
    Description:

    In this edition of Canadian Megatrends, we look at at changes in household size from 1941 to 2011.

    Release date: 2015-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-629-X2015020
    Description:

    Jerry Situ, Senior analyst presents a brief overview of housing in Canada, 2011 National Household Survey.

    Release date: 2013-09-11

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-01-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013083
    Description:

    This paper examines why rates of homeownership have been increasing amongst young higher-income households, but declining among young lower-income households. For the period from 1981 to 2006, household data from the Census of Population, supplemented with information from the Survey of Financial Security, are employed to model the decision to own across the income distribution. The model assesses whether housing market conditions (e.g., the cost of renting versus owning), the financial condition of households (e.g., whether the household has sufficient wealth to make a standard down payment), and demographic factors (e.g., changing family composition) account for these diverging trends in housing demand.

    Release date: 2013-01-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010066
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Household Spending and from its predecessor, the Survey of Family Expenditures, this paper investigates the relative incomes of retirement-age and working-age Canadians from 1969 to 2006, taking into account both explicit household income and the implicit income generated by owner-occupied housing. Over this 37-year period, the explicit incomes of retirement-age households increased at a more rapid pace than those of working-age households. Implicit income from owner-occupied housing also increased rapidly during this time, matching the rate at which the explicit income of retirement-age households increased. On average, this implicit source of earnings raised the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over) by 16%. Taking both forms of income into account, the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over), relative to the incomes of working-age households (aged 40 to 49), increased from 45% in 1969 to 59% in 2006. During this period, Canadians invested in housing assets that provided additional income upon retirement.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007299
    Description:

    Whether or not relative rates of assortative marriage have been rising in the affluent democracies has been subject to considerable dispute. First, we show how the conflicting empirical findings that have fueled the debate are frequently an artifact of alternative methodological strategies for answering the question. Then, drawing on comparable census data for Canada and the United States, we examine trends in educational homogamy and intermarriage with log-linear models for all marriages among young adults under 35 over three decades. Our results show that educational homogamy, the tendency of like to marry like, has unambiguously risen in both countries since the 1970s, with no sign of the U-turn in levels of intermarriage reported in some earlier comparative studies. Rising levels of marital homogamy were the result of declining intermarriage at both ends of the educational distribution. However, while trends for men and women were quite similar in Canada, they differed significantly in the United States. The overall rise in marital homogamy In the United States was partially offset by an increased tendency of women with some college education to marry 'down' the educational hierarchy. In Canada, the only sign of abatement in the trend toward greater educational homogamy was a slight increase in intermarriage among university-educated men and women during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2007-05-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 96F0030X
    Description:

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Daily in the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001003
    Description:

    This topic provides information on families and households in Canada. The 2001 Census data show that the diversification of family and household settings continues, and that the trends have an impact on all Canadians, including children, young adults and seniors. Several indicators are used to highlight provincial and territorial differences.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2002-10-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016196
    Description:

    This profile presents some of the characteristics of Canadian households that own a vacation home.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998115
    Description:

    Older immigrants arriving in Canada are not eligible for government transfer payments or welfare benefits for up to 10 years. Consequently, many of them choose to live with their relatives or sponsors in crowded three or more generation households. Cultural preferences also influence this tendency. The propensity for immigrant groups from developing regions to live in three or more generation households ranges up to 18 times those of their Canadian-born and the immigrant counterparts from the developed regions. The average income, percent receiving Old Age Security payments, percent widowed and duration of residence in Canada are significantly associated with proportions of immigrants living in such arrangements, and explain about 84% of birthplace variation for males and 81% for females.

    Release date: 1998-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M1996002
    Description:

    This paper attempts to rescue a small but nonetheless important segment of the Canadian population from neglect, those classified by the census as long-term residents in collective dwellings. In 1991, 440,000 Canadians belonged to this population, living in nursing homes, correctional institutions, rooming houses and the like. The changing age-sex structure of the Canadian population caused their number to increase between 1971 and 1991, despite the fact that Canadian men and women were less likely at most ages to live in collective dwellings in the latter year.

    Non-census data on several segments of this population are reviewed, especially for people in health-related institutions and in correctional facilities, and reveal that long-term residents are in each case a small fraction of a much larger population with a relatively brief contact with the institution on average. This review concludes that non-census data can provide a useful context for the study of the population in collective dwellings, but that the census is at present the only data source providing a comprehensive overview, despite the limited data collected and the even more limited data published.

    Special tabulations from the 1971, 1981 and 1991 censuses are used to explore its changing size and age-sex structure with particular attention to three of its components, people in health-related institutions, in service collective dwellings and in religious institutions. A significant difference between people in collective dwellings and those in private dwellings is that the former have, whether willingly or unwillingly, left the family circle. Hence, marital status is a key variable, and is used to show the close relationship between the changing marital status of the population, in particular the declining numbers of the never married and the growing numbers of separated, widowed or divorced older women, and structural changes.

    Release date: 1996-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 12M0005X
    Description:

    Cycle 5 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on the respondent's family and friends and interactions with them. Topics covered include marital history, common law unions, natural, adopted and step children, potential support networks, division of household work and support given and received.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1991-06-30

Reference (28)

Reference (28) (25 of 28 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3508
    Release date: 2017-12-13

  • Index and guides: 98-200-X2016006
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series describes the family situations of children living in a lone-parent family, in a stepfamily or without their biological or adoptive parents. This document also highlights a few differences by the age of the children and by province and territory.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2010002
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2005 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2010-04-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2010003
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2006 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2010-04-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2010001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2004 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2010-04-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2009002
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians).

    Release date: 2009-12-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2009001
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians)

    Release date: 2008-12-22

  • Index and guides: 97-554-G
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following demographic variable: Housing and dwelling characteristics.

    Release date: 2008-05-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2008001
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians).

    Release date: 2008-02-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2006001
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians).

    Release date: 2006-12-12

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2006007
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the data available from SLID on housing characteristics and shelter costs, with a special focus on the imputation methods used for this data. From 1994 to 2001, the survey covered only a few housing characteristics, primarily ownership status and dwelling type. In 2002, with the start of sponsorship from Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), several other characteristics and detailed shelter costs were added to the survey. Several imputation methods were also introduced at that time, in order to replace missing values due to survey non-response and to provide utility costs, which contribute to total shelter costs. These methods take advantage of SLID's longitudinal design and also use data from other sources such as the Labour Force Survey and the Census. In June 2006, further improvements in the imputation methods were introduced for 2004 and applied to past years in a historical revision. This report also documents that revision.

    Release date: 2006-07-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005007
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians).

    Release date: 2005-12-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005006
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2003 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2005-10-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2004003
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households.

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2004-12-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2004001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2002 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2004-09-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2003002
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Conducted in January, February and March after the reference year, data are collected via personal interview using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2000 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret the data, such as coefficients of variation, non-response rates, slippage rates and imputation rates.

    Release date: 2002-06-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001004
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces. (The three territories are surveyed every second year starting in 2001.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1998 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001002
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1999 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001003
    Description:

    This document provides a detailed description of the methodology of the Survey of Household Spending. Topics covered include: target population; sample design; data collection; data processing; weighting and estimation; estimation of sampling error; and data suppression and confidentiality.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2000005
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces and three territories. (The three territories are surveyed every second year.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables and descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2000-12-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2000001
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interviews conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces and three territories. (The three territories are surveyed every second year.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables and descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2000-07-19

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2000002
    Description:

    Starting with the 1997 survey year, the Family Expenditure Survey was replaced by the Survey of Household Spending (SHS). This note provides information to users and prospective users of data from the SHS about the differences between the SHS and the former Family Expenditure Survey. Topics covered include sample size, number of questions, coverage, and concepts.

    Release date: 2000-07-19

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2000003
    Description:

    Starting with the 1997 survey year, the Household Facilities and Equipment Survey was replaced by the Survey of Household Spending (SHS). This note provides information to users and prospective users of data from the SHS about the differences between the SHS and the former Household Facilities and Equipment Survey. Topics covered include sample size, weighting, collection method, reference period, and concepts.

    Release date: 2000-07-19

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