Statistics by subject – Marriage and common-law unions

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  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017024
    Description:

    Based on 2016 Census data, the following infographic provides a portrait of Canadian households, including those consisting of couple families and of young adults living with their parents.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201300111788
    Description:

    This article analyses patterns related to marital status and nuptiality in Canada. Data on marital and conjugal status come primarily from the 2011 Census of Population, with comparisons to historical data where appropriate, particularly 1981. In addition, data from the Canadian Vital Statistics Database on marriage and divorce are also analysed, with an emphasis on recent trends.

    Release date: 2013-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
    Description:

    Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

    Release date: 2013-03-05

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211335
    Description:

    Women have made substantial gains in education over the last few decades and are now more likely to have a university degree than men. At the same time, the conjugal situation of female university graduates has changed considerably. Using data from the 1981 to 2006 Censuses, this article examines how the propensity to form unions (marriage or common-law) has changed for women with university degrees compared to those without a university education. It also compares the incidence of female university graduates forming unions with similarly educated males over time.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110659
    Description:

    About 40 years ago, marriage was very popular: most children were born to, and grew up with, married parents. That has changed. Divorce has risen sharply, common-law unions have become more and more popular, and many children are born outside of marriage. Others, at a young age, see their parents divorce.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410311
    Description:

    The transition to adulthood is often viewed as a period where young people move by stages into adult roles: completing their schooling, leaving their parents' home, acquiring permanent work, finding a partner or spouse and becoming a parent. In recent years, social scientists have found that the transition to adulthood is taking longer to complete. Using census data to compare young adults in 1971 to those in 2001, it assesses just how lengthy the delay has become.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 82-618-M2007006
    Description:

    This analysis examines the relationship between the dissolution of a marital or cohabitating relationship and subsequent depression among Canadians aged 20 to 64.

    The article is based on data from the household component of the National Population Health Survey (NPHS). This longitudinal survey is conducted by Statistics Canada and has followed the same group of people every two years since 1994/1995.

    Release date: 2007-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20060059636
    Description:

    This article looks at the prevalence of depression among people who experienced a marital breakdown. It also examines other factors that might be associated with the risk of depression such as a change in income or in the level of social support. The data are from the 1994/1995 through 2004/2005 National Population Health Survey.

    Release date: 2007-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007299
    Description:

    Whether or not relative rates of assortative marriage have been rising in the affluent democracies has been subject to considerable dispute. First, we show how the conflicting empirical findings that have fueled the debate are frequently an artifact of alternative methodological strategies for answering the question. Then, drawing on comparable census data for Canada and the United States, we examine trends in educational homogamy and intermarriage with log-linear models for all marriages among young adults under 35 over three decades. Our results show that educational homogamy, the tendency of like to marry like, has unambiguously risen in both countries since the 1970s, with no sign of the U-turn in levels of intermarriage reported in some earlier comparative studies. Rising levels of marital homogamy were the result of declining intermarriage at both ends of the educational distribution. However, while trends for men and women were quite similar in Canada, they differed significantly in the United States. The overall rise in marital homogamy In the United States was partially offset by an increased tendency of women with some college education to marry 'down' the educational hierarchy. In Canada, the only sign of abatement in the trend toward greater educational homogamy was a slight increase in intermarriage among university-educated men and women during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2007-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060039478
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Census of Population and the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey to examine the prevalence of interreligious unions and social and demographic factors associated with their occurrence.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017961
    Description:

    Research consistently shows that delaying marriage tends to increase the likelihood that a person will never marry. After age 30, a single person may not wish to marry; it may seem less feasible or less desirable than it did when they were younger.

    This article looks at "mature singles," that is, men and women older than the average age at which people first marry (28 for women, 30 for men) but not yet past prime working-age (under 55). These men and women numbered over 1.1 million in 2001; they had never legally married and were not living common-law at the time of the survey. More than half a million of them did not think they would ever get married. The article examines some of the differences between those mature singles who do not expect to marry and those who do.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016882
    Description:

    This article examines the prevalence of culturally mixed marriages and common-law relationships in Canada, using data from the 2001 and 1991 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026634
    Description:

    This article compares the demographic, social and economic situation of couples who are far apart, and those who are close together, in age.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003002
    Description:

    This study explores how the recent transition to a conjugal union affects time use, the division of labour, perceptions of time and well-being differently for women and men.

    Release date: 2003-07-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-576-X
    Description:

    The increasing popularity of common-law unions is transforming family life in Canada, according to new data from the 2001 General Social Survey. Over the past 30 years, common-law unions have become more and more popular, especially in Quebec and among younger women in other provinces.

    Although younger women are more likely to start their conjugal life by living common law, most will eventually marry. First common-law unions are twice as likely to end in separation as first marriages. What is more, a growing proportion of women have experienced at least two unions, and the likelihood of choosing a common-law relationship over marriage for the second union is also increasing. The analysis shows that the trends observed in the formation and break-up of unions apply equally to men and women. Since men are on average older than women when they start their conjugal life, they tend to experience the events at an older age.

    Release date: 2002-07-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980023922
    Description:

    This article examines the relationship between attendance at religious services and overall well-being, health and marital behaviour, and the attitudes of Canadians toward children, marriage and family relationships.

    Release date: 1998-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19960004869
    Description:

    This report, using data on common-law unions from the censuses and the most recent General Social Surveys, presents an update of our knowledge on the number and characteristics of people who choose to live in common-law unions. As a report, it remains incomplete, and represents but a few more pages in a continuing story.

    Release date: 1997-03-25

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