Statistics by subject – Families, households and housing

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All (26)

All (26) (25 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114639
    Description:

    This study examines the extent to which young adults aged 20 to 29 live with their parents across various ethnocultural and socioeconomic characteristics. The results are based on data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) as well as data from previous censuses.

    Release date: 2016-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114154
    Description:

    Even though most grandparents live in separate households from their adult children and grandchildren, sometimes the grandparent and grandchild generations live together. This paper provides information on the number of grandparents who are in this particular situation, along with their living arrangements and their ethnocultural and sociodemographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111919
    Description:

    Over the last century, Canada experienced many social, economic, legislative, and cultural changes. As a result, the family circumstances and living arrangements of Canadians have evolved substantially. What can the census reveal about the changing diversity of children's living arrangements over time?

    Release date: 2014-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Table: 98-312-X201100311703
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Table: 98-312-X201100311704
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Table: 98-312-X201100311705
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Table: 98-312-X201100311702
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211345
    Description:

    This article uses the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey to examine how many people with disabilities receive help with activities of daily living; the type of daily activities with which they get help; and the care receiver's relationship to the person or persons who provide help with specific tasks. Then it explores how these relationships change as the severity of the care receiver's disability increases.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211335
    Description:

    Women have made substantial gains in education over the last few decades and are now more likely to have a university degree than men. At the same time, the conjugal situation of female university graduates has changed considerably. Using data from the 1981 to 2006 Censuses, this article examines how the propensity to form unions (marriage or common-law) has changed for women with university degrees compared to those without a university education. It also compares the incidence of female university graduates forming unions with similarly educated males over time.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211062
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211061
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710913194
    Description:

    No agreed-upon definition exists of what constitutes high income, either in dollar cut-offs or as a percentage of the population. Researchers have used widely varying methods, producing widely varying outcomes. This paper presents various criteria for defining high income and looks at some of the characteristics and behaviours of high-income taxfilers under these definitions. Income taxes paid and effective tax rates are also examined.

    Release date: 2007-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060039480
    Description:

    This paper examine patterns in adult children returning to the family home across the last few decades, the reasons for coming back, and the socio-demographic and economic factors that influence this process.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016882
    Description:

    This article examines the prevalence of culturally mixed marriages and common-law relationships in Canada, using data from the 2001 and 1991 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036619
    Description:

    This article examines the characteristics of grandparents in Canada, with a focus on those who share homes with their grandchildren.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026620
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which never-married and previously married people who have never lived common-law in the past would be willing to do so in the future.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016552
    Description:

    This article looks at 'living apart together' (LAT) relationships where unmarried couples who live in separate residences maintain an intimate relationship.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036395
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which Canadian families are financially vulnerable to adverse events, such as a sudden loss of income or unexpected bills.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005750
    Description:

    In the present research, our aims are to trace the emergence of the "blended family" (the term generally employed to describe stepfamilies with a common child), exploring which features of stepfamilies make them most susceptible to become blended families, and to assess how being born into a stepfamily affects the family experience and subsequent life course of the growing number of children involved.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035375
    Description:

    For some time, concerns have been raised about the movement of young people away from rural areas, mainly to find work. This article provides information on the extent to which youths stay, leave or return to rural communities. (Adapted from a recently published analytical report.)

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990044909
    Description:

    This article looks at Canadian families during the 20th century, and identifies some of the social, legal and economic conditions that affected them.

    Release date: 2000-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014026
    Description:

    To some important degree young people establish their living arrangements in response to the constraints and opportunities created for them by previous generations. In fact, the very definition of what it means to be a youth is at the core of this intergenerational relationship since it determines the appropriate way for people to live when they are of a particular age. The nature of the family, the structure of the school system, and the opportunities for work are the central institutions determining the transition to adulthood, and the associated living arrangements.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

Data (4)

Data (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Table: 98-312-X201100311703
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Table: 98-312-X201100311704
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Table: 98-312-X201100311705
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Table: 98-312-X201100311702
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

Analysis (22)

Analysis (22) (22 of 22 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114639
    Description:

    This study examines the extent to which young adults aged 20 to 29 live with their parents across various ethnocultural and socioeconomic characteristics. The results are based on data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) as well as data from previous censuses.

    Release date: 2016-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114154
    Description:

    Even though most grandparents live in separate households from their adult children and grandchildren, sometimes the grandparent and grandchild generations live together. This paper provides information on the number of grandparents who are in this particular situation, along with their living arrangements and their ethnocultural and sociodemographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111919
    Description:

    Over the last century, Canada experienced many social, economic, legislative, and cultural changes. As a result, the family circumstances and living arrangements of Canadians have evolved substantially. What can the census reveal about the changing diversity of children's living arrangements over time?

    Release date: 2014-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211345
    Description:

    This article uses the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey to examine how many people with disabilities receive help with activities of daily living; the type of daily activities with which they get help; and the care receiver's relationship to the person or persons who provide help with specific tasks. Then it explores how these relationships change as the severity of the care receiver's disability increases.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211335
    Description:

    Women have made substantial gains in education over the last few decades and are now more likely to have a university degree than men. At the same time, the conjugal situation of female university graduates has changed considerably. Using data from the 1981 to 2006 Censuses, this article examines how the propensity to form unions (marriage or common-law) has changed for women with university degrees compared to those without a university education. It also compares the incidence of female university graduates forming unions with similarly educated males over time.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211062
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211061
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710913194
    Description:

    No agreed-upon definition exists of what constitutes high income, either in dollar cut-offs or as a percentage of the population. Researchers have used widely varying methods, producing widely varying outcomes. This paper presents various criteria for defining high income and looks at some of the characteristics and behaviours of high-income taxfilers under these definitions. Income taxes paid and effective tax rates are also examined.

    Release date: 2007-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060039480
    Description:

    This paper examine patterns in adult children returning to the family home across the last few decades, the reasons for coming back, and the socio-demographic and economic factors that influence this process.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016882
    Description:

    This article examines the prevalence of culturally mixed marriages and common-law relationships in Canada, using data from the 2001 and 1991 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036619
    Description:

    This article examines the characteristics of grandparents in Canada, with a focus on those who share homes with their grandchildren.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026620
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which never-married and previously married people who have never lived common-law in the past would be willing to do so in the future.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016552
    Description:

    This article looks at 'living apart together' (LAT) relationships where unmarried couples who live in separate residences maintain an intimate relationship.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036395
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which Canadian families are financially vulnerable to adverse events, such as a sudden loss of income or unexpected bills.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005750
    Description:

    In the present research, our aims are to trace the emergence of the "blended family" (the term generally employed to describe stepfamilies with a common child), exploring which features of stepfamilies make them most susceptible to become blended families, and to assess how being born into a stepfamily affects the family experience and subsequent life course of the growing number of children involved.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035375
    Description:

    For some time, concerns have been raised about the movement of young people away from rural areas, mainly to find work. This article provides information on the extent to which youths stay, leave or return to rural communities. (Adapted from a recently published analytical report.)

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990044909
    Description:

    This article looks at Canadian families during the 20th century, and identifies some of the social, legal and economic conditions that affected them.

    Release date: 2000-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014026
    Description:

    To some important degree young people establish their living arrangements in response to the constraints and opportunities created for them by previous generations. In fact, the very definition of what it means to be a youth is at the core of this intergenerational relationship since it determines the appropriate way for people to live when they are of a particular age. The nature of the family, the structure of the school system, and the opportunities for work are the central institutions determining the transition to adulthood, and the associated living arrangements.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014022
    Description:

    The reproduction of poverty may very well result from the social behaviour of children as they attain adulthood and become parents. Consequently, we focus in this chapter on the impact that family life disruption has on the transition to family life in adulthood for the first generations of Canadian children experiencing parental divorce in significant proportions.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

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