Statistics by subject – Families, households and housing

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All (19)

All (19) (19 of 19 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-627-M
    Description:

    Every year, Statistics Canada collects data from hundreds of surveys. As the amount of data gathered increases, Statistics Canada has introduced infographics to help people, business owners, academics, and management at all levels, understand key information derived from the data. Infographics can be used to quickly communicate a message, to simplify the presentation of large amounts of data, to see data patterns and relationships, and to monitor changes in variables over time.

    These infographics will provide a quick overview of Statistics Canada survey data.

    Release date: 2018-01-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2017-12-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-652-X
    Description:

    This publication presents key highlights and results from the General Social Survey on the topics of caregiving and care receiving; social identity; giving, volunteering and participating; victimization; time use; and family.

    Release date: 2017-06-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 99-137-X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada has produced a hierarchical PUMF that relies on perturbation instead of suppression to protect data confidentiality. This paper describes the creation of this new type of PUMF for the Agency. The creation of this PUMF using data perturbation techniques, a first for Statistics Canada, was in many ways a research development project. In the process, ways were devised to avoid overlap with other PUMFs, to adapt and apply risk measures for a multitude of personal and household characteristics, and to carry out perturbations for related characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-599-M
    Description:

    This research paper series addresses many topics related to children and youth in Canada, including: cognitive, physical and emotional development; health; behaviour; relationships with others; experiences in the home, at school and at work; family change; and transitions to adulthood. The main data source for the papers in this series is the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-630-X
    Description:

    Matter of Fact is an analytic series highlighting what the General Social Survey (GSS) has contributed to understanding Canadian society over the last 20 years.

    The 20 years of GSS data is an opportunity to look back over our years of data and ask: What have we learned about Canadian society over those 20 years?

    This series will include short, focused, single-theme analysis documents. Over the course of the series analysis will include topics on: How satisfied are Canadians with their life in general? What is the relationship between education, work and retirement? What motivates people to retire or to continue working? How do people prepare for retirement? How is the Internet changing the way Canadians live? How are Canadians using their time? What do Canadian families look like? How have they changed in recent years? How are Canadians engaged with their families, neighbours, communities and coworkers? Which Canadians are caring for others? What is the impact of care-giving on people's work, families, leisure time and health? What are the victimization rates for Canadians, and who is most at risk of victimization? How have housing trends changed over the past 20 years? And how have religious practices changed over the past 20 years?

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-001-X
    Description:

    Update on family and labour studies is the newsletter of the Family and Labour Studies Division, a research arm of Statistics Canada devoted to analysis of the well-being of children and families and to how they interact with the labour market and social programs.

    Release date: 2007-05-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-613-M
    Description:

    This series of reports provides key background information on the trends and conditions in Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) across a number of dimensions. Subjects covered include demographics, housing, immigration, Aboriginal persons, low-income and stressed neighbourhoods, economic conditions, health, location of work and commuting mode, and culture. Most reports cover the 1981-to-2001 period.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-585-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    Using the PALS data, this article describes the lives of children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.

    Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to formal and informal help;-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and-household income.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 96F0030X
    Description:

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Daily in the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-576-X
    Description:

    The increasing popularity of common-law unions is transforming family life in Canada, according to new data from the 2001 General Social Survey. Over the past 30 years, common-law unions have become more and more popular, especially in Quebec and among younger women in other provinces.

    Although younger women are more likely to start their conjugal life by living common law, most will eventually marry. First common-law unions are twice as likely to end in separation as first marriages. What is more, a growing proportion of women have experienced at least two unions, and the likelihood of choosing a common-law relationship over marriage for the second union is also increasing. The analysis shows that the trends observed in the formation and break-up of unions apply equally to men and women. Since men are on average older than women when they start their conjugal life, they tend to experience the events at an older age.

    Release date: 2002-07-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-566-X
    Description:

    This report, based on results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), focuses on changes in the family environment, specifically, common-law unions, custody arrangements and financial issues. The NLSCY is a comprehensive survey which will follow the development of children in Canada and paint a picture of their lives.

    Release date: 1998-08-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-530-X
    Description:

    This document focuses on parents' perceptions of the availability of family-supportive workplace arrangements; their experiences in balancing paid work and family commitments; and their preferences for changes in the workplace that could help them harmonize work and family life.

    Release date: 1993-12-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-527-X
    Description:

    The report provides in-depth information about child care arrangements; it is based on a nationally representative sample of families with children less than 13 years of age.

    Release date: 1993-03-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-529-X
    Description:

    This document focuses on the relationship between parents' work lives and child care. It has two major objectives. The first is to describe parental work patterns including parents' employment status, the prevalence of full-time and part-time work, occupational characteristics, and work schedules. The second major objective is to use the data on parental work patterns and work schedules to accurately estimate child care needs.

    Release date: 1992-07-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-526-X
    Description:

    This publication is the first in a series of reports being published by Statistics Canada in collaboration with Health and Welfare Canada and the National Day Care Research Network. This report provides a history of the study, its goals and objectives, and detailed information about the 1988 National Child Care Survey.

    Release date: 1992-02-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 12M0005X
    Description:

    Cycle 5 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on the respondent's family and friends and interactions with them. Topics covered include marital history, common law unions, natural, adopted and step children, potential support networks, division of household work and support given and received.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1991-06-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-514-X
    Description:

    This publication is a collection of papers (some including tables and charts) presented by their authors at the 1989 Symposium on Social Supports. Some of the major issues addressed in the publication are: effects of AIDS on social-service workloads, impacts on women's health of having to work outside the home and care for a family, effects of family support upon seniors' usage of services from agencies and firms, ethnic differences in caring for the elderly, and various kinds of help given by the elderly to their families and to voluntary agencies. Also included are commentaries on the studies by senior professionals in fields of social service. The book contains a total of 15 papers that present research findings or review the state of knowledge in a given field of research.

    Release date: 1991-01-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-508-X
    Description:

    This national study looks at the kinds of family and friendship links upon which seniors rely for support. With an analysis of data collected in the 1985 General Social Survey, the publication shows how the network of family and friendship ties which one can expect to have, varies systematically over the course of one's life. The study demonstrates the substantial levels of help given to others by seniors, as well as the help they receive.

    Release date: 1989-04-01

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Analysis (19)

Analysis (19) (19 of 19 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-627-M
    Description:

    Every year, Statistics Canada collects data from hundreds of surveys. As the amount of data gathered increases, Statistics Canada has introduced infographics to help people, business owners, academics, and management at all levels, understand key information derived from the data. Infographics can be used to quickly communicate a message, to simplify the presentation of large amounts of data, to see data patterns and relationships, and to monitor changes in variables over time.

    These infographics will provide a quick overview of Statistics Canada survey data.

    Release date: 2018-01-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-006-X
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of data sources in order to provide information on various aspects of Canadian society, including labour, income, education, social, and demographic issues, that affect the lives of Canadians.

    Release date: 2017-12-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-652-X
    Description:

    This publication presents key highlights and results from the General Social Survey on the topics of caregiving and care receiving; social identity; giving, volunteering and participating; victimization; time use; and family.

    Release date: 2017-06-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 99-137-X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada has produced a hierarchical PUMF that relies on perturbation instead of suppression to protect data confidentiality. This paper describes the creation of this new type of PUMF for the Agency. The creation of this PUMF using data perturbation techniques, a first for Statistics Canada, was in many ways a research development project. In the process, ways were devised to avoid overlap with other PUMFs, to adapt and apply risk measures for a multitude of personal and household characteristics, and to carry out perturbations for related characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-599-M
    Description:

    This research paper series addresses many topics related to children and youth in Canada, including: cognitive, physical and emotional development; health; behaviour; relationships with others; experiences in the home, at school and at work; family change; and transitions to adulthood. The main data source for the papers in this series is the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-630-X
    Description:

    Matter of Fact is an analytic series highlighting what the General Social Survey (GSS) has contributed to understanding Canadian society over the last 20 years.

    The 20 years of GSS data is an opportunity to look back over our years of data and ask: What have we learned about Canadian society over those 20 years?

    This series will include short, focused, single-theme analysis documents. Over the course of the series analysis will include topics on: How satisfied are Canadians with their life in general? What is the relationship between education, work and retirement? What motivates people to retire or to continue working? How do people prepare for retirement? How is the Internet changing the way Canadians live? How are Canadians using their time? What do Canadian families look like? How have they changed in recent years? How are Canadians engaged with their families, neighbours, communities and coworkers? Which Canadians are caring for others? What is the impact of care-giving on people's work, families, leisure time and health? What are the victimization rates for Canadians, and who is most at risk of victimization? How have housing trends changed over the past 20 years? And how have religious practices changed over the past 20 years?

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-001-X
    Description:

    Update on family and labour studies is the newsletter of the Family and Labour Studies Division, a research arm of Statistics Canada devoted to analysis of the well-being of children and families and to how they interact with the labour market and social programs.

    Release date: 2007-05-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-613-M
    Description:

    This series of reports provides key background information on the trends and conditions in Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) across a number of dimensions. Subjects covered include demographics, housing, immigration, Aboriginal persons, low-income and stressed neighbourhoods, economic conditions, health, location of work and commuting mode, and culture. Most reports cover the 1981-to-2001 period.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-585-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    Using the PALS data, this article describes the lives of children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.

    Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to formal and informal help;-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and-household income.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 96F0030X
    Description:

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Daily in the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-576-X
    Description:

    The increasing popularity of common-law unions is transforming family life in Canada, according to new data from the 2001 General Social Survey. Over the past 30 years, common-law unions have become more and more popular, especially in Quebec and among younger women in other provinces.

    Although younger women are more likely to start their conjugal life by living common law, most will eventually marry. First common-law unions are twice as likely to end in separation as first marriages. What is more, a growing proportion of women have experienced at least two unions, and the likelihood of choosing a common-law relationship over marriage for the second union is also increasing. The analysis shows that the trends observed in the formation and break-up of unions apply equally to men and women. Since men are on average older than women when they start their conjugal life, they tend to experience the events at an older age.

    Release date: 2002-07-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-566-X
    Description:

    This report, based on results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), focuses on changes in the family environment, specifically, common-law unions, custody arrangements and financial issues. The NLSCY is a comprehensive survey which will follow the development of children in Canada and paint a picture of their lives.

    Release date: 1998-08-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-530-X
    Description:

    This document focuses on parents' perceptions of the availability of family-supportive workplace arrangements; their experiences in balancing paid work and family commitments; and their preferences for changes in the workplace that could help them harmonize work and family life.

    Release date: 1993-12-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-527-X
    Description:

    The report provides in-depth information about child care arrangements; it is based on a nationally representative sample of families with children less than 13 years of age.

    Release date: 1993-03-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-529-X
    Description:

    This document focuses on the relationship between parents' work lives and child care. It has two major objectives. The first is to describe parental work patterns including parents' employment status, the prevalence of full-time and part-time work, occupational characteristics, and work schedules. The second major objective is to use the data on parental work patterns and work schedules to accurately estimate child care needs.

    Release date: 1992-07-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-526-X
    Description:

    This publication is the first in a series of reports being published by Statistics Canada in collaboration with Health and Welfare Canada and the National Day Care Research Network. This report provides a history of the study, its goals and objectives, and detailed information about the 1988 National Child Care Survey.

    Release date: 1992-02-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 12M0005X
    Description:

    Cycle 5 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on the respondent's family and friends and interactions with them. Topics covered include marital history, common law unions, natural, adopted and step children, potential support networks, division of household work and support given and received.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1991-06-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-514-X
    Description:

    This publication is a collection of papers (some including tables and charts) presented by their authors at the 1989 Symposium on Social Supports. Some of the major issues addressed in the publication are: effects of AIDS on social-service workloads, impacts on women's health of having to work outside the home and care for a family, effects of family support upon seniors' usage of services from agencies and firms, ethnic differences in caring for the elderly, and various kinds of help given by the elderly to their families and to voluntary agencies. Also included are commentaries on the studies by senior professionals in fields of social service. The book contains a total of 15 papers that present research findings or review the state of knowledge in a given field of research.

    Release date: 1991-01-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-508-X
    Description:

    This national study looks at the kinds of family and friendship links upon which seniors rely for support. With an analysis of data collected in the 1985 General Social Survey, the publication shows how the network of family and friendship ties which one can expect to have, varies systematically over the course of one's life. The study demonstrates the substantial levels of help given to others by seniors, as well as the help they receive.

    Release date: 1989-04-01

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